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Frozen Wegetables Recalled Over Listeria

Inventure Foods, Inc. has issued a voluntary recall of certain varieties of its Fresh Frozen™ line of frozen vegetables as well as select varieties of its Jamba “At Home” line of smoothie kits due to finding of Listeria monocytogenes, in its Jefferson, GA facility. Listeria is an organism that can cause infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

These recalled products did not test positive for Listeria monocytogenes, and there are no known illnesses linked to consumption of Fresh Frozen IQF frozen vegetables or Jamba “At Home” smoothies to date. However, Inventure Foods has decided to err on the side of utmost caution and issue a voluntary recall because Listeria monocytogenes was detected in the facility during routine testing.

The Fresh Frozen products being recalled are distributed to retail outlets, including food service accounts, mass merchandise stores and supermarkets in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

The Jamba “At Home” smoothies’ products being recalled are distributed to retail outlets, including mass merchandise stores and supermarkets east of the Mississippi River. Only specific Jamba “At Home” branded products are involved in this recall. No other Jamba® branded products are affected.

Salmonella Warning: Pennsylvania Agriculture Department Warns Consumers to Discard Raw Milk Purchased at Lancaster County Dairy

Consumers who purchased raw milk from Ben K. Stoltzfus, Breezy Meadows Dairy, 2457 Stumptown Road, Bird-In-Hand, PA 17505 should discard it immediately due to Salmonella contamination.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today said raw milk collected during required routine sampling by a commercial laboratory on April 7, 2015 tested positive for the bacteria.

Breezy Meadows, owned by Ben K. Stoltzfus, sells directly to consumers at an on-farm retail store. The packaged raw milk is sold in one-gallon and ½-gallon plastic containers. Approximately 80 gallons of raw milk were sold between April 7 and April 15, 2015. The plastic containers are not labeled.

Agriculture officials have ordered the owner to stop sale of all raw milk until further notice. Two samples taken at least 24 hours apart must test negative for pathogens before the farm can resume raw milk sales.

Raw milk is milk that has not been pasteurized.

Pennsylvania law allows farms to sell raw milk, but requires the farms to be permitted and inspected by the Department of Agriculture to reduce health risks associated with unpasteurized products.

When an incident of contamination is discovered, the department’s milk sanitarian works with the raw milk permit holder to educate them on where the issue occurred and how to find a solution.

Symptoms of Salmonellosis usually appear within 12 to 72 hours after consumption and include diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps and vomiting that can last anywhere from four to seven days.

For more information about salmonella, visit www.about-salmonella.com

To date, the Pennsylvania Health Department is not aware of any illnesses related to these products. Any person who consumed raw milk from Breezy Meadows Dairy and has symptoms should consult their physician, visit their local health center or call 877-PA HEALTH (714-3258).

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

Salmonella Prompts Nuts to be Recalled

recall-signWhole Foods Market is voluntarily recalling packaged raw macadamia nuts due to possible Salmonella contamination. Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The product was labeled as “Whole Foods Market Raw Macadamia Nuts” and was packaged in 11 oz. plastic tubs. The recalled product has a best-by date of Feb. 4, 2016 and a UPC code of 7695862059-1.

Recalled items were sold in AR, AZ, CA, CO, HI, KS, LA, NM, NV, OK, TX, and UT Whole Foods Market Stores.

Hines Nut Company, Dallas, TX, today announced a voluntary recall of WALNUT HALVES & PIECES, Lot Number 6989.  The product was supplied by GOLD STATE NUT COMPANY of Biggs, CA, and packaged by Hines Nut Company. There is a possibility these nuts may be contaminated with Salmonella.

Salmonella is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and those with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The product was packaged and distributed as follows:

HINES NUT BRAND

  • 128 cases, 25 trays per carton, in black foam trays with a Green and Gold Label
  • Tray weight of 16 ounces
  • Packaged  March 3, 2015
  • Lot Number 6989 printed on label
  • Best Buy Date of 12.28.15
  • UPC 07826406516-5

Distributed in Texas via Randalls Food Stores

Taylor Farms Spinach Recalled Over Salmonella Concerns

Screen-Shot-2015-04-17-at-10.17.44-AM-186x300Schnuck Markets, Inc. of St. Louis, Mo. is recalling its Chef’s Express California Pasta Salad sold in its Deli/Chef’s Express departments April 2 – April 14, 2015 because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella , an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting in the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms, endocarditis and arthritis.

The product was distributed to 99 Schnucks stores in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and Iowa.

The product would have been labeled “Chef’s Express California Pasta Salad” and sold by weight through the company’s Deli/Chef’s Express departments.

No illnesses have been reported to date related to the consumption of this product.

This recall is a result of Taylor Farms (Salina, Calif.) recall of fresh, flat leaf spinach due to the possible contamination of Salmonella . This spinach is an ingredient in Schnucks California Pasta Salad. Schnucks has ceased sale of the California Pasta Salad at this time.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

Bad Week for Raw Milk – Two Listeria and a Salmonella

Raw Milk WarningAccording to The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture a warning that milk from the Breezy Meadows Dairy, which is located at 2457 Stumptown Road, has tested positive for Salmonella. A commercial laboratory collected the sample that tested positive during required routine sampling on April 7, according to the department. The dairy packages raw milk in unlabeled plastic one- and half-gallon containers, and sold approximately 80 gallons between April 7 and April 15.

The Vancouver Columbian report that the Spanish Sonrise Dairy in Yacolt Washington is recalling raw milk and cream products after routine testing revealed listeria monocytogenes contamination. After learning of the contamination, the owners have decided to close the dairy. Routine sampling by the Washington State Department of Agriculture found the dairy’s raw cream was contaminated with listeria monocytogenes. As a result, the dairy is voluntarily recalling all raw cow milk, goat milk and cream with expiration dates between April 16 and 21.

New York State Agriculture Commissioner Richard A. Ball today warned consumers in Sullivan County and the surrounding area not to consume unpasteurized raw farm milk from the Richard Dirie Farm due to possible Listeria contamination.  The Dirie Farm is located at 1345 Shandelee Road, Livingston Manor, New York, 12758. A sample of the milk, collected by an inspector from the department’s Division of Milk Control and Dairy Services on April 7, 2015 was subsequently tested by the Department’s Food Laboratory and discovered to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

A few weeks ago were even worse – for customers.  California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith today warned consumers that the consumption of unpasteurized (raw) dairy products may cause serious illness. Six Northern California residents have recently been diagnosed with campylobacteriosis, a bacterial infection that can come from consuming contaminated raw milk.  A recent investigation conducted by CDPH identified multiple bottles of Claravale Farm raw milk that tested positive for Campylobacter. Under the direction of the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), Claravale Farm has initiated a recall of the affected product. (See CDFA Announces Recall of Raw Milk Products at Claravale Farm of San Benito County news release.)

In 2012 Claravale Farms was linked to 22 Campylobacter illnesses by CDPH.

E. coli Outbreak in Canada Caused by Lettuce

Why you should take note

The Public Health Agency of Canada is collaborating with federal and provincial public health partners to investigate an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7, commonly called E.coli, with a possible link to leafy greens.  A specific product has not been identified yet, and the investigation is ongoing.

At this time, the risk to Canadians is low.  However, Canadians are reminded to follow safe food handling practices to avoid illness.

E. coli are bacteria that live naturally in the intestines of cattle, poultry and other animals. Most E. coli are harmless to humans, but some varieties carry genes that allow them to cause illness.

While most people made ill by E. coli experience a few days of upset stomach and then recover fully, infections can sometimes be life threatening.

Ongoing Investigation

There have been 12 cases of E.coli with a matching genetic fingerprint reported in Alberta (9), Saskatchewan (1), Ontario (1), and Newfoundland and Labrador (1). The illness onset dates range from March 13 to March 31, 2015.

Based on the investigation findings to date, exposure to leafy greens has emerged as a possible source of illness. Leafy greens can include all varieties of lettuces and other green leaf vegetables such as kale, spinach, arugula, or chard. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s investigation into the food source is ongoing. If products are identified, the Agency will inform the public and ensure that they are promptly removed from the marketplace.

The Public Health Agency routinely investigates multi-provincial gastro-intestinal illness outbreaks, including E.coli, in an effort to determine if illnesses are linked to the same source. The Agency will update Canadians when new information becomes available.

Who is most at risk?

Although anyone can get an E.coli infection, pregnant women, those with compromised immune systems, young children and older adults are most at risk for developing serious complications.

What you should do

The following tips will help you reduce your risk of infection with E. coli or other food-borne illnesses:

  • Wash fresh fruits and vegetables before eating them, clean counters and cutting boards and wash your hands regularly.
  • Bacteria can grow in the danger zone between 4 °C and 60 °C (40 °F to 140 °F). Keep cold foods cold at or below 4 °C (40 °F) and keep hot foods hot at or above 60 °C (140 °F).
  • Keep refrigerators clean and at a temperature below 4 °C (40 °F). Install a thermometer in your fridge to be sure.
  • Place raw meat, poultry and seafood in containers on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator. Use containers that are large enough to prevent raw juices from dripping onto other food or touching other food.
  • Keep raw food away from other food while shopping, storing, preparing and serving foods.
  • Read labels and follow cooking and storage instructions for all food. When buying food, make sure to check the “best before” date, and if the product has expired, let the store know.
  • Use warm soapy water to clean knives, cutting boards, utensils, your hands and any surfaces that have come in contact with food, especially meat and fish.
  • Refrigerate or freeze perishable food within two hours of cooking.
  • Freeze or consume leftovers within four days of cooking. Always reheat leftovers until steaming hot before eating.

Symptoms

People infected with E.coli can have a wide range of symptoms. Some do not get sick at all, though they can still spread the infection to others. Others feel as though they have a bad case of upset stomach. Still others become seriously ill and must be hospitalized.

The following symptoms can appear within one to ten days after contact with the bacteria:

  • severe stomach cramps
  • watery or bloody diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • nausea
  • headache
  • slight fever

Most symptoms clear up within five to ten days. However, some people who are infected with E.coli develop life-threatening symptoms, including kidney failure, seizures and stroke. While most will recover completely, others may suffer permanent health effects, like kidney damage, and some may die.

There is no real treatment for E.coli infections, other than monitoring the illness, providing comfort, and preventing dehydration through proper hydration and nutrition. People who develop complications may need further treatment, like dialysis for kidney failure. You should contact your health care provider if symptoms persist.

Salmonella Recall: Macadamia Nuts

Texas-Pecan-Company-label-287x300Texas Pecan Company Inc. of Dallas, Texas, is voluntarily recalling the items stated below; (refer to Table in Paragraph 3), because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The recalled packaged Macadamia Nuts and Gift Tins: The Executive, Junior Executive, Sweet-N-Salty and Mini Sweet-N-Salty were distributed nationwide in our retail store and through mail orders.

The product comes in an 8 ounce and 16 ounce, clear plastic bags and in our gift tins identified by the name of The Executive, Junior Executive, Sweet-N-Salty and Mini Sweet-n-Salty, sold in the months of November and December 2014, with a pack date of 14320 through 14365, located on the bottom left hand corner of the label.

TABLE:

UPC PRODUCT NAME PACK SIZE PACK DATE
031 MACADAMIA, RAW WHOLE 16 OUNCE 14320 THRU 14365
032 MACADAMIA, RAW WHOLE 8 OUNCE 14320 THRU 14365
033 MACADAMIA, WHOLE *(R/S) 16 OUNCE 14320 THRU 14365
034 MACADAMIA, WHOLE *(R/S) 8 OUNCE 14320 THRU 14365
321-54 THE EXECUTIVE GIFT TIN 1 SECTION OF 5 POUND TIN 14320 THRU 14365
320-34 JUNIOR EXECUTIVE TIN 1 SECTION OF 3 POUND TIN 14320 THRU 14365
337-56 SWEET-N-SALTY TIN 1 SECTION OF 5 POUND TIN 14320 THRU 14365
14320 THRU 14365 MINI SWEET-N-SALTY TIN 1 SECTION OF 2 POUND TIN 14320 THRU 14365

*NOTE: R/S means ROASTED AND SALTED

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem, but we voluntarily ask that you discontinue use of the product, stated above, per date of this notification.

The potential for contamination was noted after some routine sampling tests by the FDA revealed the presence of Salmonellain the Macadamia Nuts received from our supplier in November and December 2014.

Production of the product has been suspended while the FDA and our supplier continue their investigation as to the source of the problem.

More Food With Listeria Recalled

CCHV6KwVEAIr5qU.jpg-largeSabra Dipping Company has voluntarily recalled about 30,000 cases of its Classic Hummus due to possible Listeria contamination, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday.

The products being recalled are sold nationwide across all stores and supermarkets, and consumers can find the affected codes below on the top of the packages:

  • 040822011143/300067 — Sabra Classic Hummus, 10 oz — 3.059 Best before May 11, 2015.
  • 040822011143/300067 — Sabra Classic Hummus, 10 oz — 3.060 Best before May 15, 2015.
  • 040822014687/300074 — Sabra Classic Hummus, 20 oz — 3.059 Best before May 11, 2015.
  • 040822342049/301216 — Sabra Classic Hummus without Garnish, 32 oz – 3.059 Best before May 11, 2015
  • 040822017497/301290 — Sabra Classic Hummus, 17 oz Six Pack — 3.058 Best before May 11, 2015
  • 040822017497/301290 — Sabra Classic Hummus, 17 oz Six Pack — 3.059 Best before May 11, 2015
  • 040822342209/301283 — Hummus Dual Pack Classic/Garlic, 23.5 oz — 3.058 Best before May 11, 2015

So far there have been no reported illnesses associated with the product.

FDA officials say the contamination was discovered by routine random sample of the product collected on March 30 by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development that tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes.

Blue Bell Ice Cream Updates Listeria Product Recall

Blue Bell Creameries is expanding its recall of products that were produced in the Broken Arrow, Okla., plant to include Banana Pudding Ice Cream pints which tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, and additional products manufactured on the same line. These items have the potential to be young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria monocytogenesinfection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The products being recalled are distributed to retail outlets, including food service accounts, convenience stores and supermarkets in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wyoming.

On April 3, 2015, Blue Bell Creameries voluntarily suspended operations at its Broken Arrow, Okla., plant to thoroughly inspect the facility due to a 3oz. institutional/food service chocolate cup that tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes and was immediately withdrawn from all outlets. That product was only available to Blue Bell’s food service and institutional accounts and was recalled along with 3oz. vanilla and strawberry institutional/food service cups.

On April 4, 2015, out of an abundance of caution, Blue Bell began working with retail outlets to remove all products produced in Broken Arrow, Okla., from their service area. These products are identified with a code date ending in O, P, Q, R, S or T located on the bottom of the carton and they are a part of the voluntary market withdrawal.

On April 7, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration notified Blue Bell that the Banana Pudding Ice Cream pint tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes. This pint was produced in the Broken Arrow, Okla., plant on February 12, 2015. Subsequently Blue Bell is recalling all products made on that one particular production line, from February 12, 2015 – March 27, 2015. These products were produced on that same line and have a code date ending in either S or T.

Recalled products produced in Oklahoma are identified by the code date on the bottom of the carton.

Ice Cream Pints: UPC # 071899-05101 5 Code Date
Ice Cream Banana Pudding pint 021217S
Ice Cream Butter Crunch pint 021917S
Ice Cream Mint Chocolate Chip pint 022017S
Ice Cream Cookies ‘n Cream pint 030317S, 030617S
Ice Cream Homemade Vanilla pint 030417S
Ice Cream Dutch Chocolate pint 032317S
Ice Cream Moo-llennium Crunch pint 032417S, 032517S
Sherbet Pint: UPC # 0 71899-19990 8
Rainbow Sherbet pint 021717S, 021817S, 022317S, 030217S
Sherbet Quarts: UPC # 0 71899-18992 3
Orange Sherbet quart 032617S
Mixed Berry Sherbet quart 032717S
3 ounce Tab Lid Cup: Product # 136 *Institutional / food service cup only
Rainbow Sherbet 022417S, 022617S, 022717S
Gold Rim Half Gallon: UPC # 0 71899-03720 0
Ice Cream Homemade Vanilla half gallon 030917T, 031017T, 031117T, 031217T, 031717T, 031717T, 031817T
Brown Rim Half Gallon: UPC # 0 71899-83548 6
Ice Cream Pistachio Almond half gallon 031317T
Light Half Gallon: UPC # 0 71899-73501 4
Ice Cream Homemade Vanilla Light half gallon 031917T

Blue Bell Banana Pudding Ice Cream Added to Listeria Recall

DSC_0019Blue Bell Creameries is expanding its recall of products that were produced in the Broken Arrow, Okla., plant to include Banana Pudding Ice Cream pints, which tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, and additional products manufactured on the same line.

These items have the potential to be harmful to young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The products being recalled are distributed to retail outlets, including food service accounts, convenience stores and supermarkets in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wyoming.

On April 3, 2015, Blue Bell Creameries voluntarily suspended operations at its Broken Arrow, Okla., plant to thoroughly inspect the facility due to a 3oz. institutional/food service chocolate cup that tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes and was immediately withdrawn from all outlets. That product was only available to Blue Bell’s food service and institutional accounts and was recalled along with 3oz. vanilla and strawberry institutional/food service cups.

On April 4, 2015, out of an abundance of caution, Blue Bell began working with retail outlets to remove all products produced in Broken Arrow, Okla., from their service area.  These products are identified with a code date ending in O, P, Q, R, S or T located on the bottom of the carton and they are a part of the voluntary market withdrawal.

On April 7, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration notified Blue Bell that the Banana Pudding Ice Cream pint tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes. This pint was produced in the Broken Arrow, Okla., plant on February 12, 2015. Subsequently Blue Bell is recalling all products made on that one particular production line, from February 12, 2015 – March 27, 2015.  These products were produced on that same line and have a code date ending in either S or T.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as caramel apples, cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.