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Listeria Risk in Cheese causes Chicken Wrap Recall

Screen Shot 2017-02-24 at 1.16.43 PMThe U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that meat and poultry wraps  produced by JLM Manufacturing, a Shelby Township, Mich. establishment, may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. A recall was not requested because it is believed that all products have been consumed and are past their “Best by” dates.

The PREMO Brand wraps were produced on Jan. 23, 2017 and Jan. 25, 2017 and have “Best by” dates of Feb. 12, 2017 and Feb. 14, 2017. The following products subject to the public health alert are:

  • 5-oz plastic packages containing one “Ham & Cheddar Wrap.”
  • 5-oz plastic packages containing one “Italian Wrap.”
  • 5-oz plastic packages containing one “Tuscan Chicken Wrap.”

The products bear establishment number “EST. 45360” or “P-45360” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Wisconsin and West Virginia.

The problem was discovered when the firm received notification from the cheese supplier that the cheese ingredient utilized in the meat and poultry wraps was included in an expanded cheese recall due to potential contamination with L. monocytogenes. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

Cozy Vale (Valley) Creamery Linked to Raw Milk E. coli Recall

Cozy Vale (Valley) Creamery has announced another recall of its raw milk. The Washington State Department of Agriculture inspectors discovered the E. coli contamination in a sample of the dairy’s raw milk, according to the recall notice. Although the implicated raw milk is being removed from retail stores, there is concern consumers may have the milk in their homes because it is not yet out of date.

The recall covers all Cozy Vale (Valley) Creamery raw milk in quart, half-gallon and gallon plastic jugs with best-by dates of February 27 through March 4. It was sold at the on-farm store, one drop off location, and several retail stores throughout Western Washington.

“Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections may cause severe diarrhea, stomach cramps and bloody stool,” according to the recall notice. “Symptoms generally appear three to four days after exposure, but can take as long as nine days to appear. “The infection sometimes causes hemolytic uremic syndrome, (HUS) a serious disease in which red blood cells are destroyed and the kidneys fail. Infants, children, pregnant women, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems are especially at risk.”

Over Thanksgiving week 2011, Cozy Vale Creamery’s raw milk products were recalled because they were linked to three E. coli O157:H7 illnesses and after environmental swabbing at the facility discovered that locations in the milking parlor and processing areas were contaminated with the E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.  At least two of those cases were children who developed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.  Cozy Vale Creamery’s whole and skim milk and cream were distributed through seven retail outlets in Pierce, Thurston and King counties. They products were sold retail at the farm store and at Marlene’s Market in Tacoma, two Olympia Food Co-Op locations in Olympia, Olympia Local Foods in Tumwater, Yelm Co-op in Yelm, Mt. Community Co-op in Eatonville and Marlene’s Market in Federal Way.

E. coli: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Morrisons recalls Peppered Beef Slices because of the presence of Listeria

1820_trhp5hw12j.jpegMorrisons is recalling a batch of Peppered Beef Slices because Listeria monocytogenes has been found in the product.

  • Product: Ready to Eat Peppered Beef Slices
  • Pack size: 150g
  • 
‘Use By’ date: 21 February 2017

The presence of Listeria monocytogenes in the product(s) listed. Symptoms caused by this organism can be similar to flu and include high temperature, muscle ache or pain, chills, feeling or being sick and diarrhoea. However, in rare cases, the infection can be more severe, causing serious complications, such as meningitis.

Some people are more vulnerable to listeria infections, including those over 65 years of age, pregnant women and their unborn babies, babies less than one month old and people with weakened immune systems.

If you have bought the above product do not eat it.

Listeria Risk in Noodles

UCM541999Veggie Noodle Co. of Austin, Texas is voluntarily recalling a limited quantity of Butternut Spirals due to possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.  Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled product was distributed to Whole Foods Markets and other retailers in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio and Wisconsin.  The recalled product is packaged in a 10.7oz clear plastic container, has the UPC Code 852287006059 and has an “Enjoy By” date of February 23, 2017 (located on the side of the packaging). Products with other “Enjoy By” dates are not affected. Sold in refrigerated sections of the grocery store. The potential contamination of the Butternut Spirals was found as a result of routine product testing and the recall was initiated by Veggie Noodle Co. out of an abundance of caution.

There are no reported illnesses associated with this recall to date.

Consumers who have purchased the recalled Veggie Noodle Co. Butternut Spirals are urged not to consume it.

Sargento Cheese causes Taylor Farms Salad Recall

Screen Shot 2017-02-11 at 4.49.02 PMTwo Taylor Farms establishments, located in Dallas, Texas and in Tracy, California, and headquartered in Salinas, California, are recalling approximately 6,630 pounds of chicken and pork salad products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The firms produced and packaged the products from Feb. 6-9, 2017. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 10.5 oz. plastic trays of “Signature Cafe Southwest Chicken Premade Salad” with the following “USE BY” dates: “2/13/17, 2/14/17 or 2/15/17.”
  • 10.5 oz. plastic trays of “Signature Café Southwest Style Salad with Chicken” with the following “USE BY” dates: “2/14/17, 2/15/17 or 2/16/17.”
  • 10.5 oz. plastic trays of “H-E-B Shake Rattle & Bowl Rowdy Ranch Hand (contains pork)” with the following “USE BY” dates: “2/17/17, 2/18/17 or 2/19/17.”

The products subject to recall bear either establishment number M/P-34013 or M/P-34733 inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to distribution centers in Los Angeles and Tracy, Calif.; Portland, Ore; and Houston, Roanoke and San Antonio, Texas.

The problem was discovered on Feb. 10, 2017, when both establishments were notified by Sargento Foods, Inc., which supplies Bevel Shred Pepperjack cheese products to the Taylor Farms establishments. The cheese products are being recalled by Sargento Foods, Inc. out an abundance of caution due to potential Lm contamination.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

Consumption of food contaminated with Lm can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Listeria Recall: Meijer Brand Colby Cheese and Colby Jack Cheese

Meijer-Application-300x300Meijer is announcing a recall of its Meijer Brand Colby Cheese and Colby Jack Cheese sold exclusively through its deli counters due to a potential contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, a Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The Meijer Brand Colby Cheese and Colby Jack Cheese were sold in Meijer stores from Nov. 10, 2016 to Feb. 9, 2017. There have been no known illnesses reported to Meijer from the product affected by this recall.

Meijer received notice of a possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination from MDS Foods, a Meijer supplier that sources the Meijer branded cheeses from Deutsch Kase Haus, a cheese manufacturer based in Middlebury, Indiana. MDS Foods informed Meijer that evidence of potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination had been identified by the manufacturer.

The recalled product will be in plastic deli packaging with printed labels that have the UPCs 215927xxxxxx or 215938xxxxxx – the last 6 digits will vary, and are determined by weight since the product was purchased at the deli counter.

Pimento Spread Recalled after Positive Listeria Test

16496672-1486075681-220x123Charlotte, NC  Ruth’s Salads is undertaking a recall of Ruth’s Original Pimento Spread in 7oz plastic containers.  The product has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria Monocytogenes.

Consumers who have purchased this 7 oz Ruth’s Original Pimento Spread with the Lot #16, Sell By Date 4/30/2017 are urged to return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund.

The contamination was discovered during random testing by the NC Department of Agriculture.  Consumers with questions may contact the company at 800-532-0409 between the hours of 7AM and 3 PM Monday-Friday.  After hours, consumers may leave a message and your call will be returned as soon as possible.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infections can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The recalled product was distributed in grocery stores  in NC, SC, GA, and parts of Virginia and Tennessee.

Listeria Recall: Ready to Eat Chicken Strips

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that ready to eat chicken strips products produced by House of Raeford, a Mocksville, N.C. establishment, may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. A recall was not requested because it is believed that all products have now been consumed.

The ready to eat, fully cooked, chicken breast strips items were produced and packaged on September 29, 2016 and served to consumers in December, 2016.

These items were shipped to a distributor in Cleveland, Ohio and then shipped to various restaurants in the area as part of fajita or gyro dishes.

The problem was discovered during routine testing by the establishment. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Listeria:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeria infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

E. coli O26 and O45 Tests Prompt Veal Recall

Gold Medal Packing Inc., a Rome, N.Y. establishment, is recalling approximately 4,607 pounds of boneless veal products that may be contaminated with E. coli O26 and O45, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

Screen Shot 2016-12-23 at 4.01.50 PMThe veal trim and top bottom sirloin (TBS) products were produced and packaged on August 16, 2016, and October 25, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 60-lb. boxes containing “BONELESS VEAL”.
  • 2,387-lb. bin containing “TBS”.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 17965” inside the USDA mark of inspection. The “BONELESS VEAL” items were shipped to a warehouse in California and the “TBS” items were shipped to distributor locations in Pennsylvania.

The problem was discovered during routine sample testing. There have been no confirmed reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O26 or O45, because they are harder to identify than STEC O157. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after consuming the organism. Most people infected with STEC O26 or O45 develop diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended.

Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is uncommon with STEC O26 or STEC O45 infections. HUS can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 year’s old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them

Salmonella in Powdered Milk Prompts Pork Skin Recall

Screen Shot 2016-12-22 at 5.59.08 PMPork Rinds & Snacks, LLC, a Spartanburg, S.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 7,629 pounds of pork skin products that may be contaminated with Salmonella, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ready-to-eat pork skin items were produced on various dates between Sept. 27, 2016 and Dec. 13, 2016. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 4022 lbs. of 9/16 oz. plastic packages containing “WALLACE’S OLD FASHIONED FRIED PORK SKINS FLAVORED WITH Salsa & Sour Cream SEASONING CHICHARRONES” with Best By dates ranging from “JAN 05 17” to “MAR 23 17.”
  • 3208-lbs. of 1.5 oz. plastic packages containing “WALLACE’S OLD FASHIONED FRIED PORK SKINS FLAVORED WITH SALSA & SOUR CREAM SEASONING CHICHARRONES” with Best By dates ranging from “JAN 05 17” to “MAR 23 17.”
  • 399-lbs. of 9/16 oz. plastic packages containing “COUNTRY TIME Old Fashioned Fried PORK SKINS CHICHARRONES SALSA & SOUR CREAM FLAVOR” with Best By dates ranging from “JAN 05 17”to “MAR 23 17.”

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. M00888” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia.

The problem was discovered when the company’s seasoning supplier notified the company that the seasoning mix contained milk powder recalled by Valley Milk Products. Valley Milk Products recalled nonfat high heat milk powder and sweet cream buttermilk powder products on December 9, 2016, due to potential Salmonella contamination. For details on that recall please see Valley Milk Products Recalls Milk and Buttermilk Powder Because of Possible Health Risks.

There have been no confirmed reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.  Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.