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Food Poison Journal

Food Poisoning Outbreaks and Litigation: Surveillance and Analysis

Listeria Recall: Ready to Eat Chicken Strips

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that ready to eat chicken strips products produced by House of Raeford, a Mocksville, N.C. establishment, may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. A recall was not requested because it is believed that all products have now been consumed.

The ready to eat, fully cooked, chicken breast strips items were produced and packaged on September 29, 2016 and served to consumers in December, 2016.

These items were shipped to a distributor in Cleveland, Ohio and then shipped to various restaurants in the area as part of fajita or gyro dishes.

The problem was discovered during routine testing by the establishment. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Listeria:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeria infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Deli Meats Recalled Over Listeria Concerns

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns that assorted sliced deli meat products served to customers at Dion’s restaurants may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. The assorted sliced deli meats were produced by Peter DeFries Corporation, an Albuquerque, N.M. establishment.

The sliced roast beef, ham, pastrami, and turkey items were produced between Dec. 14, 2016 and Dec. 29, 2016, however product may have been available in restaurant locations through January 4, 2017.

These items were distributed to Dion’s restaurant locations in Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. The sliced deli meat products are used on pizzas, salads, and open-faced sandwiches for customers at Dion’s restaurants.

The problem was discovered through routine testing conducted as part of the Peter DeFries Corporation’s Listeria testing program. Anyone concerned about an illness should contact a health care provider.

Consumption of food contaminated with L. monocytogenes can cause listeriosis, a serious infection that primarily affects older adults, persons with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women and their newborns. Less commonly, persons outside these risk groups are affected.

Listeriosis can cause fever, muscle aches, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance and convulsions sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. An invasive infection spreads beyond the gastrointestinal tract. In pregnant women, the infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, premature delivery or life-threatening infection of the newborn. In addition, serious and sometimes fatal infections can occur in older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. Listeriosis is treated with antibiotics. Persons in the higher-risk categories who experience flu-like symptoms within two months after eating contaminated food should seek medical care and tell the health care provider about eating the contaminated food.

Consumers who have purchased these products from Dion’s restaurants are urged not to consume them.

Listeria:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeria infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Salmonella cases linked to hazelnuts sold at Schmidt Farm roadside stand

hazelRecent cases of salmonellosis, a foodborne illness caused by exposure to Salmonella bacteria, have been linked to hazelnuts sold at a farm stand in McMinnville, and state agencies are recommending that people who bought the nuts discard them immediately.

Officials at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division and the Oregon Department of Agriculture announced today that laboratory and epidemiologic analyses traced the salmonellosis cases to hazelnuts sold by Schmidt Farm and Nursery along Oregon Route 18.

“People who have hazelnuts from the farm stand at Schmidt Farm and Nursery should toss them out right away,” said Paul Cieslak, MD, medical director of the Public Health Division’s Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention Section.

Five people became ill with a specific strain of Salmonella Typhimurium between Oct. 15 and Dec. 13. When interviewed by public health officials, three of the individuals recalled buying hazelnuts from the Schmidt Farm and Nursery stand in McMinnville. The fourth ate hazelnuts from an unlabeled bag of partially shelled nuts. A fifth case was linked to the other four cases after having tested positive for the same strain of Salmonella. Tests performed on nuts purchased at the farm also identified the same strain of Salmonella. All five cases were in adults. None of the individuals were hospitalized and all have recovered.

According to the Oregon Department of Agriculture, Schmidt Farm and Nursery sells only a small portion of its hazelnuts at the farm stand. Schmidt Farm and Nursery distributes the bulk of its hazelnuts through wholesalers.

“Wholesalers have steps in place that kill any Salmonella on the hazelnuts they handle before the nuts reach consumers,” said Stephanie Page, the agriculture department’s director of food safety and animal services. “To date, we have no indication there were any issues with this part of the process. The concern in this case is with hazelnuts bought at the farm stand.”

Raw or undercooked poultry, meats and eggs are the most common sources of Salmonella, but other foods such as hazelnuts can become contaminated. Contamination of other foods on a farm typically occurs when product is exposed to feces from an animal carrying Salmonella or to its environment. It also can happen when an uncontaminated product has direct or indirect exposure to product containing Salmonella. In homes, foods can be contaminated when raw or undercooked meat, poultry or eggs come into contact with other foods.

Most people who get salmonellosis become sick in one to five days after exposure. Salmonellosis can cause diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps that can last up to seven days. Most people recover without treatment, but in some cases the diarrhea is so severe that hospital care is needed. Though rare, the most severe cases of Salmonella can lead to death if not treated.

People can take steps to prevent Salmonella at home, including washing their hands before cooking and after being around animals; keeping food preparation surfaces clean; washing raw fruits and vegetables before eating; keeping raw vegetables away from raw meat, poultry or eggs; always cooking meat and poultry to the proper temperature; and drinking only pasteurized milk and juices.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.