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Food Poison Journal

Food Poisoning Outbreaks and Litigation: Surveillance and Analysis

Salami Recalled for Misbranding and Without Benefit of Inspection

Bolzano Artisan Meats LLC, a Milwaukee, Wis. establishment is recalling approximately 5,723 pounds of salami products for misbranding and because they were produced without the benefit of federal inspection, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.  Products produced under the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (WDATCP) inspection program are eligible for sale within the state of Wisconsin when they bear the Wisconsin state inspection shield on the immediate package.  The products being recalled, however, incorrectly bear the Cooperative Interstate Shipment (CIS) program version of the USDA Mark of Inspection, which requires federal acceptance into the program.  Because the establishment is not part of the CIS program, products they produced and distributed bearing the CIS program version of the USDA Mark of Inspection cannot be sold through interstate commerce.

The products subject to recall include: [View Label (PDF Only)]

  • 6-oz. or 12-oz. packages of “Bolzano Artisan Meats All Natural Uncured, Old School Salami,” 6/6-oz. or 3/12-oz. packages per case (UPC 7935 7389 6360)
  • 6-oz. or 12-oz. packages of “Bolzano Artisan Meats All Natural Uncured, Pamplona Runner Salami,” 6/6-oz. or 3/12-oz. packages per case (UPC 7935 7389 6353)
  • 6-oz. or 12-oz. packages of “Bolzano Artisan Meats All Natural Uncured, Fin Oh Kee Oh Na Salami,” 6/6-oz. or 3/12-oz. packages per case (UPC 7935 7320 3564)
  • 6-oz. or 12-oz. packages of “Bolzano Artisan Meats All Natural Uncured, Pig Red Salami,” 6/6-oz. or 3/12-oz. packages per case (UPC 7935 7320 3571)
  • 6-oz. or 12-oz. packages of “Bolzano Artisan Meats All Natural Uncured, Pitzotl Salami,” 6/6-oz. or 3/12-oz. packages per case (UPC 7935 7322 1698)
  • 6-oz. or 12-oz. packages of “Bolzano Artisan Meats All Natural Uncured, RauchZwiebel Salami,” 6/6-oz. or 3/12-oz. packages per case (UPC 7395 7320 3588)

The products subject to recall were produced between Sept. 20, 2013 and March 15, 2014, include batch numbers 1208 to 1214, and bear the CIS program version of USDA Mark of Inspection with the establishment number “EST. 692SEWI.” Cases containing the products subject to recall may bear the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (WDATCP) inspection label, but the individual product packages may be misbranded with the CIS program version of the USDA Mark of Inspection.  Products bearing the Wisconsin state inspection shield on the immediate package are not subject to this recall.  The recalled products were distributed for institutional and retail sales nationwide as well as sold over the internet.

The problem was discovered by FSIS personnel after receiving information about the product being in commerce.  The company began using new packaging labels with the CIS program USDA Mark of Inspection before implementing all federal requirements that would authorize use of the USDA Mark of Inspection through the CIS program.  Wisconsin state inspection personnel were not aware of the application of labels, and have been assisting FSIS in the investigation of this issue.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of illness due to consumption of these products.

Campylobacter, Vibrio Up, E. coli, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella, Cryptoporidium, Cyclospora and Yersinia Flat

MMWR reported the 2013 FoodNet data today and it was a bit depressing.

FoodNet conducts active, population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed infections caused by CampylobacterCryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Listeria, Salmonella, Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 and non-O157Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia in 10 sites covering approximately 15% of the U.S. population.  For information on those bugs, see www.foodborneillness.com.

In 2013, FoodNet identified 19,056 cases of infection, 4,200 hospitalizations, and 80 deaths.  The number and incidence per 100,000 population were Salmonella (7,277 [15.19]), Campylobacter (6,621 [13.82]), Shigella (2,309 [4.82]), Cryptosporidium (1,186 [2.48]), STEC non-O157 (561 [1.17]), STEC O157 (552 [1.15]), Vibrio (242 [0.51]), Yersinia (171 [0.36]), Listeria (123 [0.26]), and Cyclospora (14 [0.03]). Incidence was highest among persons aged ≥65 years for Cyclospora, Listeria, and Vibrio and among children aged <5 years for all the other pathogens.

Compared with 2010–2012, the 2013 incidence was significantly lower for Salmonella (9% decrease; CI = 3%–15%), higher for Vibrio (32% increase; CI = 8%–61%) and not significantly changed for other pathogens.  Compared with 2006–2008, the 2013 incidence was significantly higher for Campylobacter and Vibrio.  The overall incidence of infection with six key foodborne pathogens was not significantly different in 2013 compared with 2010–2012 or 2006–2008.

The incidence of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections was lower in 2013 than 2010–2012, whereas the incidence of Vibrio infections increased. No changes were observed for infection with Campylobacter, Listeria, STEC O157, or Yersinia

Attorney Bill Marler to Address Utah Public Health Association in Speech on Foodborne Illness Outbreaks and Investigations

Seattle-based attorney Bill Marler will be in Provo, Utah Wednesday to present the keynote address for the Utah Public Health Association in a speech about current issues related to foodborne illness outbreaks and investigations. Marler’s audience will consist of medical doctors, nurses, health educators, environmental health scientists, epidemiologists, university students and state and local health department employees.

This will mark the 6th food safety-related speech this year for Marler. He has spoken to groups of university students, attorneys, public health and food industry professionals at various venues across the nation this year.

“I like to think our food supply is just a little bit safer because of the work I do,” said Marler. “We’re all in this together.”

Marler is the nation’s leading lawyer representing victims of foodborne illness.  His law firm, Marler Clark, has represented thousands of victims of Salmonella, E. coli and other foodborne illness outbreaks traced to food items such as tomatoes, spinach, ground beef and cantaloupe.  He speaks frequently on issues related to the safety of our food supply.

Marler Clark Retained to File E. coli Lawsuit Against Trader Joe’s

A total of 33 persons infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O157:H7 were reported from four states.

The number of ill persons identified in each state was as follows: Arizona (1), California (28), Texas (1), and Washington (3).

32% of ill persons were hospitalized. Two ill persons developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), and no deaths were reported.

The STEC O157:H7 PFGE pattern combination in this outbreak was new to the PulseNet database.

Epidemiologic and traceback investigations conducted by local, state, and federal officials indicated that consumption of two ready-to-eat salads, Field Fresh Chopped Salad with Grilled Chicken and Mexicali Salad with Chili Lime Chicken, produced by Glass Onion Catering and sold at Trader Joe’s grocery store locations, was the likely source of this outbreak of STEC O157:H7 infections.

On November 10, 2013, Glass Onion Catering voluntarily recalled numerous ready-to-eat salads and sandwich wrap products that may be contaminated with STEC O157:H7.

Read the list of recalled products regulated by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS)

Read the list of recalled products regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

E. coli:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.