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Food Poison Journal Food Poisoning Outbreaks and Litigation: Surveillance and Analysis

Texas Salmonella Outbreak: Iguana Joe’s Should Pay Out-of-Pocket Medical Costs and Lost Wages

William Marler, attorney for victims of the recent Salmonella outbreak traced to the Iguana Joe’s restaurant in Humble, Texas, called on the restaurant today to pay all outbreak victims’ out-of-pocket medical costs and lost wages for missed time off work to care for themselves or family members suffering from Salmonella infections linked to the restaurant’s food.  According to a KHOU news report on June 21, at least a dozen people fell ill with Salmonella infections after eating at the Iguana Joe’s restaurant in Humble over Father’s Day weekend.

Marler noted that his clients had sought medical treatment for Salmonella.  “We’ve seen other responsible companies step up to the plate and pay Salmonella outbreak victims’ medical bills up front in the past.  It’s the right thing to do,” he said.

Salmonella infections can have a broad range of illness, from no symptoms to severe illness. The most common clinical presentation is acute gastroenteritis. Symptoms include diarrhea and abdominal cramps, often accompanied by fever of 100°F to 102°F (38°C to 39°C). Other symptoms may include bloody diarrhea, vomiting, headache and body aches.

“Even for people with health insurance, medical bills can cause a financial strain.  That’s especially true if a person misses time from work and does not receive paid time off.  Iguana Joe’s apparent failure to produce a safe product impacts not only my clients’ physical health but potentially also their financial health,” Marler continued.  “The company should make an effort to restore its customers’ financial health as soon as possible.”

BACKGROUND:  William Marler and the attorneys at Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks.  The law firm has recovered over $600 million in verdicts and settlements on behalf of victims of foodborne illness.