According to SA Health the investigation into a Salmonella outbreak linked to three Angkor Bakery stores has found the likely source of contamination was related to handling of raw egg products.

SA Health’s Acting Director of Public Health Services, Dr. Fay Jenkins, said a number of food and environmental samples collected from all stores last week returned positive results for Salmonella.

“Given the sample results and the strain of the Salmonella outbreak, it is most likely that the cause of contamination was related to handling raw egg products,” Dr. Jenkins said.

“The owners of the Angkor Bakery stores continue to work closely with the local councils and SA Health to improve their practices, and all three bakeries closed voluntarily during the investigation.

“Following the remediation work, subsequent tests returned negative results for Salmonella, and all three of the businesses are able to reopen. They will be closely monitored by the local council.”

The number of cases of Salmonella linked to this outbreak has risen to 51, including 19 people who required hospitalization.

Raw egg products can be risky ingredients if they are not appropriately handled, and safe handling practices should be followed by businesses and in the home.

“Many food poisoning outbreaks have been associated with foods containing raw or partially cooked eggs such as aioli, mayonnaise, hollandaise or tartare sauce and mousse,” Dr. Jenkins said.

“The external shell of eggs may contain harmful bacteria such as Salmonella, and while eggs may not necessarily look or smell ‘off’ they may be contaminated.

“It’s important to check that eggs are clean and not cracked or dirty – and those that are should be thrown out.

“Preparation surfaces and utensils should be thoroughly washed, sanitized and dried after handling eggs, and remember to think of raw eggs like raw meat, and wash your hands thoroughly after handling them.”

People can experience symptoms of Salmonella infection between six and 72 hours after exposure and symptoms usually last for three to seven days.

These include fever, diarrhea, vomiting, headaches, stomach cramps and loss of appetite.

More severe symptoms may occur in young children, older people, pregnant women and people who are immunocompromised.

Anyone who develops these symptoms and is concerned should see their doctor and get tested for Salmonella.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

According to the CDC, since the last update on December 21, 2018, 63 ill people from 24 states, and the District of Columbia, have been added to this investigation.

As of February 13, 2019, 279 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 41 states and the District of Columbia. 107 people have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from California.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that raw turkey products from a variety of sources are contaminated with Salmonella Reading and are making people sick. In interviews, ill people report eating different types and brands of turkey products purchased from many different locations. Four ill people lived in households where raw turkey pet food was fed to pets. The outbreak strain has been identified in samples taken from raw turkey pet food, raw turkey products, and live turkeys.

Several turkey products have been recalled because they might have been contaminated with Salmonella. Please see the list of recalled items below. A single, common supplier of raw turkey products or of live turkeys has not been identified that could account for the whole outbreak.

The Public Health Agency of CanadaExternalhas identified ill people in Canada infected with Salmonella Reading bacteria with the same DNA fingerprint.  As of January 31, 2019, there have been 72 confirmed cases of Salmonella Reading illness investigated in the following provinces and territories: British Columbia (20), Alberta (24), Saskatchewan (6), Manitoba (13), Ontario (6), New Brunswick (1), Northwest Territories (1), and Nunavut (1). Individuals became sick between April 2017 and early January 2019. Eighteen individuals have been hospitalized. One individual has died. Individuals who became ill are between 0 and 96 years of age. The majority of cases (55%) are female.

The outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading is present in live turkeys and in many types of raw turkey products, indicating it might be widespread in the turkey industry. CDC and USDA-FSIS have shared this information with representatives from the turkey industry and requested that they take steps to reduce Salmonella contamination.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonellainfection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

In response to a recall by Satur Farms, Whole Foods Market is voluntarily recalling various prepared foods items in eight states containing baby spinach because of a potential contamination of Salmonella.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The affected products, including salads, pizza, sandwiches and wraps, were sold at stores in Connecticut, Florida, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. No illnesses have been reported at this time.

Affected products are labeled with a Whole Foods Market scale label and can be identified by the following information. Additionally, consumers who purchased items containing baby spinach from the salad bars or hot bars at Whole Foods Market locations in these states should discard items purchased through January 23, 2019.

Product Product Code (begins with) Sell by Date Affected States
Chicken Florentine Panini 0265249 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Golden Beet & Tangerine Salad 0276651 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Locavore Cheese Steak Wrap 0288833 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Mediterranean Stuffed Salmon 0276640 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Quinoa with Dark Leafy Greens 0276652 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Roasted Vegetables Panini 0286668 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Salad Spring Berry Power 0261702 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Smoked Turkey with Apple & Cheddar Sandwich 0289436 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Spinach and Vegetable Quinoa Salad 0287410 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Spinach Ravioli Salad with Lemon, Tomato, and Parmesan CC 0262216 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Strawberry Balsamic Quinoa CC 0226215 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Tofu Shawarma Wrap 0225938 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Turkey Avocado Sandwich (Turkado Sandwich) 0268506 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Turkey with Spinach & Feta Sandwich 0278131 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Vegan Spinach Almond Ricotta Pizza 0289927 1/26/2019 CT, MA, ME, NH, RI
Chicken Cordon Blue Panini 0236489 1/24/2019 CT, NJ, NY
New England Cranberry Turkey Sandwich 0236543 1/24/2019 CT, NJ, NY
Paleo Mediterranean Tuna Salad 0278786 1/27/2019 CT, NJ, NY
Spinach, Sauteed with Garlic CC 0262208 1/27/2019 CT, NJ, NY
Avocado Dragon Ball Bowl 0239999 1/27/2019 FL
Bistro Pasta Salad 0270265 1/26/2019 FL
Breakfast Sandwich Platter 0289062 1/26/2019 FL
Chicken Enchiladas Dinner 0268015 1/28/2019 FL
Cilantro & Lime Chicken Burrito 0270878 1/26/2019 FL
Coconut Kiwi Butter Bowl 0251413 1/27/2019 FL
Egg White & Spinach Breakfast 0276983 1/27/2019 FL
Egg White Burrito 0276829 1/27/2019 FL
Eggplant Rolantini 0270871 1/26/2019 FL
Focaccia Vegetable Pesto Sandwich 0260646 1/27/2019 FL
Goat Cheese Salad With Mandarin Orange & Candied Cashews 0272681 1/27/2019 FL
I Yam What I Yam Bowl 0251986 1/27/2019 FL
Large Brasserie Cheese Goat Salad 0272680 1/27/2019 FL
Large Goat Cheese Green Salad 0289143 1/28/2019 FL
Large Spinach & Mushroom Salad 0272061 1/27/2019 FL
Maple Glazed Acorn Squash 0284071 1/26/2019 FL
Mesclun Mix With Candied Pecans & Sun Dried Cranberries 0272093 1/27/2019 FL
Mesclun Mix With Candied Pecans & SunDried Cranberries 0272788 1/27/2019 FL
Mustard Crusted Salmon 0271328 1/28/2019 FL
My Big Fat Greek Pizza 0270663 1/26/2019 FL
Orange Lentil Vegetable Egg Bowl 0251625 1/27/2019 FL
Pizza Il Mediterraneo 0229250 1/24/2019 FL
Salad Golden Beets Tangerine 0271078 1/26/2019 FL
Sandwich Baguette Chicken Saltimbocca 0237929 1/26/2019 FL
Sandwich Baguette Turkey Brie 0237933 1/26/2019 FL
Sandwich Ham Olive Sliced 0236398 1/27/2019 FL
Serbian Ajvar Vegetable Club 0220041 1/28/2019 FL
Small Spinach & Mushroom Salad 0272793 1/27/2019 FL
Smoked Mozzarella Pasta 0225081 1/28/2019 FL
Spinach Artichoke Bleus Pizza 0271388 1/26/2019 FL
Spinach Gorgonzola Salad 0267982 1/26/2019 FL
Spinach Strawberry Goat Cheese Salad 0260136 1/28/2019 FL
Spinach Walnut Bleus Pizza 0271331 1/26/2019 FL
Vegetable Pesto Focaccia 0244952 1/27/2019 FL
Vegetable Pesto Focaccia Sandwich 0244953 1/27/2019 FL
Watermelon Garbanzo Vegetable Bowl 0251968 1/27/2019 FL

Satur Farms, 3705 Alvah’s Lane, Cutchogue, NY 11935 is voluntarily recalling Baby Spinach and Mesclun with the specific lot numbers listed below because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e. aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis. The following product was distributed in New York and Florida through retail stores.

Retail product is packed in plastic clamshell containers with Satur Farms brand name:

5 oz, 10 oz, 16 oz
Food service product is packed in sealed poly bags:
2-1/2 lbs, 3#, 4#, 4 x 2.5#, 4 x 3#

Spinach Lot #18494
Spinach Lot #18513
Mesclun Lot #18520

There have been no reported illnesses.

The voluntary recall is being initiated following routine sampling by Florida Department of Agriculture and New York State Department of Agriculture and markets. Consumers who have purchase Satur Farms products with these lot numbers are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Satur Farms requests all consignees (wholesalers and retailers) to hold and discontinue selling their existing stock of this product.

General Mills announced today a voluntary national recall of five-pound bags of its Gold Medal Unbleached Flour with a better if used by date of April 20, 2020.

The recall is being issued for the potential presence of Salmonella which was discovered during sampling of the five-pound bag product. This recall is being issued out of an abundance of care as General Mills has not received any direct consumer reports of confirmed illnesses related to this product.

This recall only affects this one date code of Gold Medal Unbleached Flour five-pound bags. All other types of Gold Medal Flour are not affected by this recall.

Consumers are asked to check their pantries and dispose of the product affected by this recall.

Guidance from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) continues to warn that consumers should refrain from consuming any raw products made with flour. Salmonella is killed by heat through baking, frying, sautéing or boiling products made with flour. All surfaces, hands and utensils should be properly cleaned after contact with flour or dough.

This voluntary recall includes the following code date currently in stores or consumers’ pantries:

Gold Medal Unbleached All Purpose 5LB Flour
Package UPC 000-16000-19610-0
Recalled Better if Used by Date 20APR2020KC

Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

Hy-Vee, Inc. is voluntarily recalling its cheesecakes made with Diamond Crystal Brands cheesecake mix due to the potential that they may be contaminated with Salmonella. The potential for contamination was brought to Hy-Vee’s attention today after receiving a letter from the supplier.

The voluntary recall includes 32 varieties of cheesecakes in both 8-ounce and 32-ounce packages with best if used by dates of Dec. 6, 2018, through Jan. 11, 2019. No illnesses have been reported to date.

The mixture was distributed to 117 of Hy-Vee’s 249 grocery stores across its eight-state region of Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin. The product comes in a plastic container with a plastic lid. The expiration date range is between Dec. 6, 2018, and Jan. 11, 2019. The expiration date can be found on the label. Below is a list of products that are being voluntarily recalled:

02-80142-00000 Cherry Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-80141-00000 Cherry Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-80146-00000 Oreo Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-80145-00000 Oreo Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-80148-00000 Pumpkin Fluff Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-80147-00000 Pumpkin Fluff Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-80150-00000 Strawberry Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-80149-00000 Strawberry Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-80224-00000 Mint Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-80223-00000 Mint Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82327-00000 Turtle Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82328-00000 Turtle Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-80153-00000 Flag Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-80151-00000 Flag Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82315-00000 Mint Chip Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82316-00000 Mint Chip Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82317-00000 Strawberry Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82318-00000 Strawberry Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82319-00000 Lemon Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82320-00000 Lemon Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82321-00000 Pumpkin Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82322-00000 Pumpkin Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82323-00000 Chocolate Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82324-00000 Chocolate Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82325-00000 Sea Salted Caramel Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82326-00000 Sea Salted Caramel Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82329-00000 Golden Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82330-00000 Golden Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82331-00000 Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82332-00000 Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

02-82333-00000 Smores Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz

02-82334-00000 Smores Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz

The Public Health Agency of Canada is collaborating with provincial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada to investigate an outbreak of Salmonella infections.

Based on the investigation findings to date, exposure to raw turkey and raw chicken products has been identified as the likely source of the outbreak. Many of the individuals who became sick reported eating different types of turkey and chicken products before their illnesses occurred.

Almost half of the illnesses included in this active investigation occurred in October and November 2018. These illnesses are genetically related to illnesses that date back to 2017. The outbreak appears to be ongoing, as illnesses continue to be reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada.
Salmonella bacteria are commonly found in raw or undercooked poultry like turkey or chicken. The bacteria are most-often transmitted to people when they improperly handle, eat or cook contaminated foods.

This outbreak is a reminder of the importance of using safe food handling practices if you are preparing, cooking, cleaning or storing raw turkey and raw chicken food products. These raw products can have bacteria that can easily be spread around food preparation areas and can make you sick if safe food-handling practices are not properly followed.

Canadians across the country are reminded to always handle raw turkey and raw chicken carefully, and to cook it thoroughly to prevent food-related illnesses like Salmonella. The Public Health Agency of Canada is not advising that consumers avoid eating properly cooked turkey or chicken products, nor is it advising retailers to stop selling raw turkey and raw chicken products.

This public health notice is being issued to inform Canadians of the investigation findings to date and to share important safe food-handling practices to help prevent further Salmonella infections. This notice will be updated as the investigation evolves.

As of December 21, 2018, there have been 22 confirmed cases of Salmonella Reading illness investigated in the following provinces: British Columbia (9), Alberta (7), Manitoba (5), and New Brunswick (1). Individuals became sick between April 2017 and mid-November 2018. Five individuals have been hospitalized. One individual has died. Individuals who became ill are between 0 and 93 years of age. The majority of cases (64%) are female.

The collaborative outbreak investigation was initiated due to an increase of Salmonella Reading illnesses that occurred in October and November 2018. Through the use of a laboratory method called whole genome sequencing, some Salmonella illnesses dating back to 2017 were identified to have the same genetic strain as the illnesses that occurred in October and November 2018. Almost half of the illnesses under investigation occurred in October and November 2018.

It is possible that more recent illnesses may be reported in the outbreak because there is a period of time between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported to public health officials. This period of time is called the case reporting delay. In national Salmonella outbreak investigations, the case reporting delay is usually between 5 and 6 weeks.

The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S. CDC) is also investigating similar Salmonella illnesses in several states that have been linked to raw turkey exposure. There have been some turkey products recalled in the U.S. that were associated with this outbreak. These products were not imported or distributed in the Canadian marketplace.

The CFIA is collaborating with the overall outbreak investigation and is liaising with the U.S. Department of Agriculture regarding their investigation into the potential turkey source. The CFIA will issue food recall warnings to inform Canadians if any products recalled in the U.S. were imported in Canada.

Since the last update on November 8, 2018, 52 ill people from 26 states and the District of Columbia have been added to this investigation. As of December 18, 2018, 216 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 38 states and the District of Columbia. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Illnesses started on dates from November 20, 2017, to December 6, 2018. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 99, with a median age of 40. Fifty-five percent of ill people are female. Of 175 people with information available, 84 (48%) have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from California.

Whole genome sequencing analysis (WGS) did not identify predicted antibiotic resistance in 132 isolates from 61 ill people and 71 food and animal samples. However, 80 isolates from ill people and 97 isolates from food, animal, and environmental samples contained genes for resistance or decreased susceptibility to all or some of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, kanamycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, and fosfomycin. Testing of six outbreak isolates using standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory confirmed these results. Most of the infections in this outbreak are susceptible to the antibiotics that are commonly used for treatment, so this resistance likely will not affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people.

State and local health departments continue to interview ill people about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Fifty-eight (54%) of the 108 ill people interviewed reported preparing or eating turkey products that were purchased raw, including ground turkey, turkey pieces, and whole turkey. Ill people reported buying many different brands of raw turkey products from multiple stores. Also, 3 of the 108 ill people interviewed became sick after pets in their home ate raw ground turkey pet food. Four of the 108 ill people interviewed worked in a facility that raises or processes turkeys, or lived with someone who did.

Public health officials in Arizona and Michigan collected unopened Jennie-O brand ground turkey from the homes of two ill people. WGS showed that Salmonella bacteria isolated from the ill persons and from the ground turkey were closely related genetically. This result provides more evidence that people in this outbreak got sick from eating turkey.

On November 15, 2018, Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, LLC, in Barron, Wisconsin recalled approximately 91,388 pounds of raw ground turkey products. On December 21, 2018, Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, LLC, in Faribault, Minnesota recalled approximately 164,210 pounds of raw ground turkey products.

Ill people in this outbreak report buying many different brands of raw turkey products from multiple stores. Available data indicate that this strain of Salmonella Reading may be present in live turkeys and in raw turkey products. A single, common supplier of raw turkey products or of live turkeys has not been identified that could account for the whole outbreak.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Summary

Public Health investigated an outbreak of salmonellosis (caused by Salmonella bacteria) associated with Burien Fresh Smoothies in Burien. The exact food or drink item that caused the illnesses has not been identified.

Illnesses

Since August 15, 2018, eleven people from six separate meal parties reported becoming ill after consuming food and beverage from Burien Fresh Smoothies from August 6–8, 2018. Two of the ill people were hospitalized and have since recovered. There is no indication that any employees of the restaurant have had any symptoms consistent with salmonellosis.

Public Health actions

As part of the Public Health investigation, Environmental Health investigators visited the restaurant on August 15, 2018. Investigators found that the restaurant was serving cooked pork prepared at the restaurant owner’s home, which is not an approved food safety practice. The restaurant was directed to immediately stop serving pork-based food items and to remove them from their menu.

However, on August 16, 2018, we identified a fourth ill person diagnosed with salmonellosis after eating at Burien Fresh Smoothies on August 7, 2018. This person did not eat any pork-based food items. On August 16, 2018, our Environmental Health investigators revisited the establishment and suspended its permit.

On August 17, 2018, an additional three ill people were identified (one person with lab-confirmed salmonellosis, two people with symptoms consistent with salmonellosis).

Burien Fresh Smoothies was allowed to reopen on August 20, after Public Health confirmed the restaurant completed a thorough cleaning and disinfection of their establishment, adopted safe food handling practices to minimize cross contamination risks, and discarded any remaining processed ready-to-eat food products. Additionally, Environmental Health investigators worked closely with Burien Fresh Smoothies owners to educate them about using only approved food sources. The restaurant will be allowed to sell pork-based foods once our food safety team determines the owners have secured an alternative approved source.Laboratory testing

Eight of the eleven people who got sick tested positive for Salmonella Braenderup with the same genetic fingerprint, suggesting that they have a common source of infection.

Food samples collected from the establishment tested negative for salmonella. We were not able to confirm which food or beverage caused these illnesses.

An additional 87 ill people from 16 states were included in this investigation since the last update on November 15, 2018. States with newly reported illnesses include: Michigan, Mississippi, and West Virginia.

As of December 12, 2018, 333 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport have been reported from 28 states.Illnesses started on dates ranging from August 5, 2018 to November 9, 2018.

91 people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that ground beef produced by JBS Tolleson, Inc. is a likely source of this outbreak.

On October 4, 2018, JBS Tolleson, Inc. recalled approximately 6.9 million pounds of beef products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Newport. On December 4, 2018, JBS Tolleson, Inc. recalled an additional 5.2 million pounds of beef products.

Personally, as I said to the Los Angeles Times some time ago, “I think that anything that can poison or kill a person should be listed as an adulterant [in food].”  Ignoring Salmonella in meat makes little, if any, sense. Even after the Court’s twisted opinion in Supreme Beef v. USDA, where it found Salmonella “not an adulterant per se, meaning its presence does not require the USDA to refuse to stamp such meat ‘inspected and passed,” our government’s failure to confront the reality of Salmonella, especially antibiotic-resistant Salmonella, is inexcusable.  The Wisconsin Supreme Court in Kriefall v Excel called it as it saw it:

The E. coli strain that killed Brianna and made the others sick is a “deleterious substance which may render [meat] injurious to health.” There is no dispute about this. Thus, under the first part of 21 U.S.C. § 601(m)(1), meat that either “bears or contains” E. coli O157:H7 (the “deleterious substance”) is “adulterated.” That E. coli O157:H7 contamination can be rendered non-“injurious to health” by cooking thoroughly, as discussed below, does not negate this; Congress used the phrase “may render,” not “in every circumstance renders.” Moreover, if the E. coli bacteria is not considered to be “an added substance,” because it comes from some of the animals themselves and is not either applied or supplied during the slaughtering process (although we do not decide this), it cannot be said that the E. coli strain “does not ordinarily render [the meat on or in which it appears] injurious to health.” Accordingly, meat contaminated by E. coli O157:H7 is also “adulterated” under the second part of § 601(m)(1).

Now, why would Salmonella be different? According to the CDC, it is estimated that 1.4 million cases of salmonellosis occur each year in the U.S. Of those cases, 95 percent are related to foodborne causes.  Approximately 220 of each 1000 cases result in hospitalization, and 8 of every 1000 cases result in death.  About 500 to 1,000 deaths – 31 percent of all food-related deaths – are caused by Salmonella infections each year. So, where do we stand with the existing USDA/FSIS law on adulteration?  Here is the law:

21 U.S.C. § 601(m)(4) – SUBCHAPTER I – INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS; ADULTERATION AND MISBRANDING – CHAPTER 12 – MEAT INSPECTION – TITLE 21—FOOD AND DRUGS

(m) The term “adulterated” shall apply to any carcass, part thereof, meat or meat food product under one or more of the following circumstances:

(1) if it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to health; but in case the substance is not an added substance, such article shall not be considered adulterated under this clause if the quantity of such substance in or on such article does not ordinarily render it injurious to health; …

(3) if it consists in whole or in part of any filthyputrid, or decomposed substance or is for any other reason unsound, unhealthfulunwholesome, or otherwise unfit for human food;

(4) if it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health; …

Hmmm. It is hard to read the above and not think that the words in bold equate to all E. coli and Salmonella (frankly, all pathogens in food).  I know, I am just a lawyer, but don’t ya think that when food with animal feces (and a dash of E. coli O157:H7) in it is considered an adulterant, that other animal feces (with dashes of other pathogens, like Salmonella) in them, should be considered adulterated too?  But, hey, that is just me. Another odd governmental fact is that the FDA does not seem to make a distinction between pathogens it considers adulterants or not.  FDA’s enabling legislation – Sec. 402. [21 USC §342] of the Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act also defines “Adulterated Food” as food that is: 

(a) Poisonous, insanitary, or deleterious ingredients.

(1) If it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to health; but in case the substance is not an added substance such food shall not be considered adulterated under this clause if the quantity of such substance in such food does not ordinarily render it injurious to health;

(2) If it bears or contains any added poisonous or added deleterious substance … that is unsafe within the meaning of section 406;

(3) if it consists in whole or in part of any filthy, putrid, or decomposed substance, or if it is otherwise unfit for food;

(4) if it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health …

It would be interesting, and perhaps entertaining, to have House and Senate hearings focusing on what should and should not be considered adulterants in our food.  I can see panels of scientists from various fields, FDA, USDA and FSIS officials, beef and produce industry representatives and consumers discussing this.  I would pay to watch it.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritisor Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.