SEATTLE, WA – Marler Clark, the Nation’s Food Safety Law Firm, has hired two new attorneys over the past year. Jenny Schell and Josh Fensterbush both graduated from Seattle University School of Law, the alma mater of managing partner, Bill Marler. Unfortunately, 2018 has been one of the busiest years for Marler Clark representing victims of foodborne illness. The firm has 100 clients from the romaine E. colioutbreak alone as well as clients from:

  • Cyclosporaoutbreak linked to Fresh Express salads
  • Cyclosporaoutbreak linked to Del Monte vegetable trays
  • Salmonellaoutbreak linked to Jimmy John’s sprouts
  • Salmonellaoutbreak linked to Fareway chicken salad
  • Salmonella outbreak linked to Rose Acre Farms
  • Salmonellaoutbreak linked to Caito cut melons
  • Salmonella outbreak linked to Kellog’s Honey Smacks
  • Salmonellaoutbreak linked to Hy-Vee pasta salad

Jenny joined Marler Clark in August 2018. Before joining us, she served as a judicial clerk for Associate Chief Justice Charles W. Johnson of the Washington State Supreme Court. While in law school, Jenny was a legal extern for Judge Beth Andrus in King County Superior Court and worked with organizations such as the ACLU of Washington and the Washington Appellate Project. She speaks fluent Spanish and worked in immigration defense before law school.

Jenny graduated from Seattle University School of Law, magna cum laude, in 2017. She also has a B.A. with honors in history from Lewis & Clark College. Outside of work, she enjoys playing music and doing anything outdoors, especially if she can take her dog with her.

Josh joined Marler Clark in March 2017, after graduating from Seattle University School of Law, Cum Laude. During law school, Josh served as a legal extern to Commissioner Kanazawa at Division 1 of the Washington State Court of Appeals, as a local Casework Coordinator for the International Refugee Assistance Project and was also appointed Research & Technical Editor of the Seattle University Law Review.

At Marler Clark, Josh serves in multiple capacities to bring about effective results for claimants of foodborne injuries. He has worked on a variety of cases involving E. coli, hepatitis A, Salmonella, and Listeriaoutbreaks, and his work regularly involves conducting discovery matters, researching critical litigatory issues, drafting pleadings and motions, and participating in mediations and trial preparation.

Josh is also proud alumnus of Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in International Relations and Philosophy. His activities during that time not only influenced him to pursue a legal education, but also fostered in him a deep love for the outdoors, biking, rugby, and beer.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, has represented thousands of individuals in claims against food companies whose contaminated products have caused life altering injury and even death. Marler Clark formed after managing partner, Bill Marler, began litigating foodborne illness cases in 1993, when he represented Brianne Kiner, the most seriously injured survivor of the historic Jack in the Box E. coliO157:H7 outbreak, in her landmark $15.6 million settlement with the company.  The 2011 book, Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. coli Outbreak that Changed the Way Americans Eat, by best-selling author Jeff Benedict, chronicles the Jack in the Box outbreak and the rise of Bill Marler as a food safety attorney.  A new edition of the book is coming out later this year.

SEATTLE, Washington – Marler Blog has been selected by the ABA Journal as one of the 100 best digital media for a legal audience. Additionally, Marler Blog along with Food Poison Journal were recognized as two of the Top 30 Food Safety Blogs, Websites & Newsletters to Follow in 2018 by Feedspot.com. Both websites are run by Bill Marler, the managing partner at Marler Clark, the food safety law firm. Mr. Marler uses the sites to raise awareness about foodborne illness outbreaks and recalls and to call for food safety policy reform.

An accomplished attorney and national expert in food safety, William (Bill) Marler has become the most prominent foodborne illness lawyer in America and a major force in food policy in the U.S. and around the world.  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, has represented thousands of individuals in claims against food companies whose contaminated products have caused life altering injury and even death.

Bill began litigating foodborne illness cases in 1993, when he represented Brianne Kiner, the most seriously injured survivor of the historic Jack in the Box E. coli O157:H7 outbreak, in her landmark $15.6 million settlement with the company.  The 2011 book, Poisoned: The True Story of the Deadly E. coli Outbreak that Changed the Way Americans Eat, by best-selling author Jeff Benedict, chronicles the Jack in the Box outbreak and the rise of Bill Marler as a food safety attorney.

For the last 25 years, Bill has represented victims of nearly every large foodborne illness outbreak in the United States, filing lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, Chili’s, Chi-Chi’s, Chipotle, ConAgra, Dole, Excel, Golden Corral, KFC, McDonald’s, Odwalla, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Sizzler, Supervalu, Taco Bell and Wendy’s. Through his work, he has secured over $650,000,000 for victims of E. coli, Salmonella, and other foodborne illnesses.

Among the most notable cases he has litigated, Bill counts those of nineteen-year-old dancer Stephanie Smith, who was sickened by an E. coli-contaminated hamburger that left her brain damaged and paralyzed, and Linda Rivera, a fifty-seven-year-old mother of six from Nevada, who was hospitalized for over 2 years after she was stricken with what her doctor described as “the most severe multi-organ [bowel, kidney, brain, lung, gall bladder, and pancreas] case of E. coli mediated HUS I have seen in my extensive experience.”

Fast Facts of CDC: Surveillance for Foodborne Disease Outbreaks — United States, 2009–2015 Surveillance Summaries / July 27, 2018 / 67(10);1–11:

2009–2015: 5,760 outbreaks that resulted in 100,939 illnesses, 5,699 hospitalizations, and 145 deaths.

Among 2,953 outbreaks with a single confirmed etiology:

  1. Norovirus was the most common cause of outbreaks (1,130 outbreaks [38%]) and outbreak-associated illnesses (27,623 illnesses [41%]).
  2. Salmonella with 896 outbreaks (30%) and 23,662 illnesses (35%).
  3. Outbreaks caused by ListeriaSalmonella, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) were responsible for 82% of all hospitalizations and 82% of deaths reported.

Among 1,281 outbreaks in which the food reported could be classified into a single food category:

  1. Fish were the most commonly implicated category (222 outbreaks [17%]).
  2. Dairy (136 [11%]).
  3. Chicken (123 [10%]).

The food categories responsible for the most outbreak-associated illnesses were:

  1. Chicken (3,114 illnesses [12%]).
  2. Pork (2,670 [10%]).
  3. Seeded vegetables (2,572 [10%]).

Multistate outbreaks comprised only 3% of all outbreaks reported but accounted for 11% of illnesses, 34% of hospitalizations, and 54% of deaths.

Problem/Condition: Known foodborne disease agents are estimated to cause approximately 9.4 million illnesses each year in the United States. Although only a small subset of illnesses are associated with recognized outbreaks, data from outbreak investigations provide insight into the foods and pathogens that cause illnesses and the settings and conditions in which they occur.

Description of System: The Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (FDOSS) collects data on foodborne disease outbreaks, which are defined as the occurrence of two or more cases of a similar illness resulting from the ingestion of a common food. Since the early 1960s, foodborne outbreaks have been reported voluntarily to CDC by state, local, and territorial health departments using a standard form. Beginning in 2009, FDOSS reporting was made through the National Outbreak Reporting System, a web-based platform launched that year.

Results: During 2009–2015, FDOSS received reports of 5,760 outbreaks that resulted in 100,939 illnesses, 5,699 hospitalizations, and 145 deaths. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and CDC reported outbreaks. Among 2,953 outbreaks with a single confirmed etiology, norovirus was the most common cause of outbreaks (1,130 outbreaks [38%]) and outbreak-associated illnesses (27,623 illnesses [41%]), followed by Salmonella with 896 outbreaks (30%) and 23,662 illnesses (35%). Outbreaks caused by ListeriaSalmonella, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) were responsible for 82% of all hospitalizations and 82% of deaths reported. Among 1,281 outbreaks in which the food reported could be classified into a single food category, fish were the most commonly implicated category (222 outbreaks [17%]), followed by dairy (136 [11%]) and chicken (123 [10%]). The food categories responsible for the most outbreak-associated illnesses were chicken (3,114 illnesses [12%]), pork (2,670 [10%]), and seeded vegetables (2,572 [10%]). Multistate outbreaks comprised only 3% of all outbreaks reported but accounted for 11% of illnesses, 34% of hospitalizations, and 54% of deaths.

Location: A location of preparation was provided for 5,022 outbreak reports (87%), with 4,696 (94%) indicating a single location. Among outbreaks reporting a single location of preparation, restaurants were the most common location (2,880 outbreaks [61%]), followed by catering or banquet facilities (636 [14%]) and private homes (561 [12%]). Sit-down dining style restaurants (2,239 [48%]) were the most commonly reported type of restaurant. The locations of food preparation with the most outbreak-associated illnesses were restaurants (33,465 illnesses [43%]), catering or banquet facilities (18,141 [24%]), and institutions, such as schools (9,806 [13%]). The preparation location with the largest average number of illnesses per outbreak was institutions (46.5), whereas restaurants had the smallest (11.6).

Outbreaks: Outbreak investigators identified a food in 2,442 outbreaks (42%). These outbreaks resulted in 51,341 illnesses (51%). The food reported belonged to a single food category in 1,281 outbreaks (22%). The food category most commonly implicated was fish (222 outbreaks [17%]), followed by dairy (136 [11%]) and chicken (123 [10%]). The food categories responsible for the most outbreak-associated illnesses were chicken (3,114 illnesses [12%]), pork (2,670 [10%]), and seeded vegetables (2,572 [10%]). Scombroid toxin in fish was the single confirmed etiology and food category pair responsible for the most outbreaks (85), followed by ciguatoxin in fish (72) and Campylobacter in dairy (60). The pathogen-food category pairs that caused the most outbreak-associated illnesses were Salmonella in eggs (2,422 illnesses), Salmonella in seeded vegetables (2,203), and Salmonella in chicken (1,941). In comparison, scombroid toxin and ciguatoxin outbreaks from fish resulted in 519 outbreak-associated illnesses, an average of three illnesses per outbreak. Outbreaks of Salmonella infections from seeded vegetables resulted in an average of 88 illnesses per outbreak, and outbreaks of Salmonella infections from eggs resulted in an average of 78 illnesses per outbreak.

Food Implicated: Several novel food vehicles caused outbreaks during the study period. In 2011, an outbreak of Salmonella serotype Enteritidis infections linked to pine nuts imported from Turkey resulted in 53 illnesses and two hospitalizations. In 2014, an outbreak of Salmonella serotypes Gaminara, Hartford, and Oranienburg in chia seed powder imported from Canada caused 45 illnesses and seven hospitalizations. An outbreak of STEC serogroups O26 and O121 infections that began in 2015 was linked to raw wheat flour produced in the United States; it resulted in 56 illnesses and 16 hospitalizations in 24 states. An outbreak of Salmonella serotype Virchow infections attributable to moringa leaf powder imported from South Africa began in 2015 and caused 35 illnesses and six hospitalizations in 24 states. It was an ingredient of an organic powdered shake mix branded to be used as a meal replacement.

Multistate Outbreaks: Multistate outbreaks comprised only 3% of outbreaks but were responsible for 11% of illnesses, 34% of hospitalizations, and 54% of deaths. Multistate outbreaks involved a median of seven states with a range of two to 45 states in which exposure occurred. The largest of the 177 multistate outbreaks was caused by Salmonella serotype Enteritidis and due to contaminated shell eggs. An estimated 1,939 persons were infected in 10 states beginning in 2010. An outbreak of Salmonella serotype Poona infections attributed to cucumbers in 2015 had the second highest number of illnesses (907 illnesses in 40 states). This outbreak also had the most outbreak-associated hospitalizations (204 [22% of cases]). An outbreak of Salmonella serotype Heidelberg infections attributed to chicken during 2013–2014 had the second most hospitalizations (200 [32% of cases]) and involved persons from 29 states and Puerto Rico. An outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections attributed to cantaloupes in 28 states in 2011 had the most deaths (33 [22% of cases]), followed in 2014 by an outbreak in 12 states of Listeria monocytogenes infections attributed to caramel apples, another novel food vehicle (9), in which seven persons (20% of cases) died.

Daniel Dewey-Mattia, MPH; Karunya Manikonda, MPH; Aron J. Hall, DVM; Matthew E. Wise, PhD; Samuel J. Crowe, PhD.

  1. CDC Annual summaries of foodborne outbreaks. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/fdoss/annual-reports/index.html
  2. Scallan E, Hoekstra RM, Angulo FJ, et al. Foodborne illness acquired in the United States—major pathogens. Emerg Infect Dis 2011;17:7–15. CrossRefPubMed
  3. National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). Foodborne disease outbreak 2011 case definition. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2013. http://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/foodborne-disease-outbreak/case-definition/2011
  4. PulseNet. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/pulsenet/index.html
  5. Guide to confirming an etiology in foodborne disease outbreak. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2015. https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/outbreaks/investigating-outbreaks/confirming_diagnosis.html
  6. Interagency Food Safety Analytics Collaboration (IFSAC) Food Categorization Scheme. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2015. https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/ifsac/projects/food-categorization-scheme.html
  7. Richardson LC, Bazaco MC, Parker CC, et al. An updated scheme for categorizing foods implicated in foodborne disease outbreaks: a tri-agency collaboration. Foodborne Pathog Dis 2017;14:701–10. CrossRefPubMed
  8. US Census Bureau. Population and housing unit estimates. Washington, DC: US Department of Commerce, US Census Bureau; 2016. https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/popest.html
  9. Angelo KM, Conrad AR, Saupe A, et al. Multistate outbreak of Listeria monocytogenesinfections linked to whole apples used in commercially produced, prepackaged caramel apples: United States, 2014–2015. Epidemiol Infect 2017;145:848–56. CrossRef PubMed
  10. Gould LH, Kline J, Monahan C, Vierk K. Outbreaks of disease associated with food imported into the United States, 1996–2014. Emerg Infect Dis 2017;23:525–8. CrossRefPubMed
  11. Gould LH, Walsh KA, Vieira AR, et al. . Surveillance for foodborne disease outbreaks—United States, 1998–2008. MMWR Surveill Summ 2013;62(No. SS-2):1–34. PubMed
  12. Hall AJ, Wikswo ME, Pringle K, Gould LH, Parashar UD. Vital signs: foodborne norovirus outbreaks—United States, 2009–2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2014;63:491–5. PubMed
  13. Food and Drug Administration. Food Code 2017. Silver Spring, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration; 2018. https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/RetailFoodProtection/FoodCode/ucm595139.htm
  14. Tauxe RV. Emerging foodborne diseases: an evolving public health challenge. Emerg Infect Dis 1997;3:425–34. CrossRefPubMed
  15. Food and Drug Administration. Egg safety final rule. Silver Spring, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration; 2017. http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Eggs/ucm170615.htm
  16. Food and Drug Administration. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Silver Spring, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration; 2017. https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA
  17. Food Safety and Inspection Service. Salmonella action plan. Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service; 2015. https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/foodborne-illness-and-disease/salmonella/sap

First off, yes, 2018 seems to be – and we are just 1/2 way into it – a very Big, Bad year for foodborne illnesses.  Second, I am not sure why.  It could be better surveillance by state, local and national health authorities utilizing cutting edge tools such as PFGE and WGS.  It could be a lack of support for inspectors.  It is certainly possible that it is more imports with a greater supply chain with a great chance for contamination or temperature abuse.  It also could be more mass produced fresh, ready to eat foods without a “kill step.”  It also could be none of those things, but it seems to me to be more than just random events.  Here are some of the highlights of 2018:

E. coli

Romaine Lettuce – 218 sick in US and Canada with 96 hospitalizations and 5 deaths.

 

Cyclospora

McDonald’s Salads – 163 sick with 3 hospitalizations.

Del Monte Vegetable Trays – 237 sick with 7 hospitalizations.

 

Salmonella

Jimmy John’s Sprouts – 10 sick.

Kratom – 199 sick with 50 hospitalizations.

Fareway/Triple T Chicken Salad – 265 sick with 94 hospitalizations and 1 death.

Go Smile Coconut – 14 sick with 3 hospitalizations.

Rose Acre Shell Eggs – 45 sick with 11 hospitalizations.

Caito Cut Melons – 70 sick with 34 hospitalizations.

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks – 100 sick with 34 hospitalizations.

Hy-Vee Pasta Salad – 21 sick with 5 hospitalizations.

Raw Turkey – 90 sick with 40 hospitalizations.

Vibrio parahaemolyticus

Venezuelan Crab Meat – 12 sick with 4 hospitalizations.

And, we are only 1/2 way through the year.

The food attorneys at Marler Clark are the nation’s leading lawyers representing victims of foodborne illnesses such as E. coli, Salmonella, and Listeria.

Marler Clark was established in 1998 by the top food attorneys for the plaintiffs and defendants in the landmark litigation arising from the 1993 Jack in the Box E. coli outbreak.

The firm has since represented thousands of victims of foodborne illness outbreaks across the country.

The Marler Clark food attorneys focus solely on representing victims of foodborne illness outbreaks, representing victims of E. coli, Hepatitis A, Campylobacter, Listeria, norovirus, Salmonella, and Shigella outbreaks nationwide. Marler Clark has litigated against huge corporations including Cargill, Dole, Wal-Mart, Wendy’s, McDonald’s, Nebraska Beef, Nestle, and Yum! Brands on behalf of clients injured in foodborne illness outbreaks traced back to the companies’ food products. Our food attorneys have won over $650 million dollars in settlements for our clients.

Marler Clark’s attorneys travel widely to speak to environmental health and industry groups, university students, and food safety conference audiences, often on topics related to the intersection of public health and the law and preventing foodborne illness.

The law firm advocates for safer food by working with clients to tell their stories; Bill Marler and several of the firm’s clients have testified before Congress about illnesses from unsafe food. Marler Clark publishes premier sources of online information on food safety: Food Safety NewsFood Poison JournalReal Raw Milk Facts, and the Outbreak Database.

Since June 11, 2018, Public Health has learned of 17 people from a single meal party who became ill after consuming food and beverage from a buffet at Lahori Kabab-n-Grill in Kent on June 10, 2018. Symptoms and timing of their illness onset are suggestive of a bacterial toxin, such as Bacillus cereus or Clostridium perfringens.

The exact food or drink item that caused the illness has not been identified, though this is not uncommon for outbreaks associated with a bacterial toxin.

Ruiz Food Products, Inc., a Denison, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 50,706 pounds of frozen breakfast burritos that may be contaminated with extraneous material, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen cook and serve breakfast burritos were produced on March 3, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Label (PDF only)]

  • 3.38-lb. plastic wrapped packages containing 12 Count, 4.5-ounce individually wrapped frozen “EL MONTEREY SIGNATURE BURRITOS, EGG, SAUSAGE, CHEESE & POTATO” with lot code 18062 and 18063, and a best if used date of 3/3/2019 or 3/4/2019.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 17523A” on the back of the packaging. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered after the company received complaints from consumers who reported finding white, semi-rigid plastic pieces in the product.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Eddy Packing Co., Inc., a Yoakum, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 18,390 pounds of smoked sausage that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically soft plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen, ready-to-eat smoked sausage items were produced on March 14, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Label (PDF only)]

• 10-lb. case of “CARL’S PORK AND BEEF SMOKED SAUSAGE WITH A STICK” with lot code 8073, case code PS9319 and sell by date of March 14, 2019.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST 4800” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to food service businesses in Texas.

The problem was discovered after the company received a customer complaint about soft, green plastic material found in the product.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers after having purchased the product from food service businesses. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Hormel Food Corp., a Fremont, NE establishment, is recalling approximately 228,614 pounds of canned pork and chicken products that may be contaminated with foreign matter, specifically pieces of metal, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The canned pork and chicken products were produced on February 8 through February 10, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Labels (PDF only)]

  • 12-oz. metal cans containing “SPAM Classic” with a “Best By” February 2021 date and production codes: F020881, F020882, F020883, F020884, F020885, F020886, F020887, F020888 and F020889. These products were shipped throughout the United States.
  • 12-oz. metal cans containing “Hormel Foods Black-Label Luncheon Loaf” with a “Best By” February 2021 date and production codes F02098 and F02108. These products were shipped to Guam only.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 199N” on the bottom of the can. These items were shipped throughout the United States and to Guam.

The problem was discovered after the firm received four consumer complaints stating that metal objects were found in the canned products. FSIS was notified on May 25, 2018.

There have been reports of minor oral injuries associated with consumption of the products. FSIS has received no additional reports of injury or illness from consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ food pantries. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

As of April 18, 2018, 53 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 16 states. Alaska 1, Arizona 3, California 1, Connecticut 2, Idaho, 10, Illinois 1, Louisiana 1, Michigan 2, Missouri 1, Montana 6, New Jersey 7, New York 2, Ohio 2, Pennsylvania, 12, Virginia 1 and Washington , linked to chopped romaine lettuce grown in Yuma California.

Outbreaks associated with lettuce and other leafy greens are by no means a new phenomenon. Outlined below is a list of E. coli and other pathogen outbreaks involving contaminated lettuce or leafy greens – Thanks to the folks at http://www.barfblog.com for compiling a rather stunning list of outbreaks – in PDF FORM.  Thanks to Doug and Ben.

Date Causative Agent Illnesses Reported Source
Nov. 2017- Dec. 2017 E. coli O157:H7 41, 1 death  romaine lettuce
Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 Listeria monocytogenes 19, 1 death package salads
Apr. 2015 Escherichia coli, Shiga toxin-producing 7 prepackaged leafy greens
Mar. 2015 E. coli O157:H7 12 leafy greens
Jul. 2014 E. coli O111 15 Salad/cabbage served at Applebee’s  and Yard House (Minnesota)
Oct. 2013 E. coli O157:H7 33 Pre-packaged salads and sandwich wraps (California)
Jul. 2013 E. coli O157:H7 94 Lettuce served at Federico’s Mexican Restaurant
Jul. 2013 Cyclospora 140 (Iowa); 87 (Nebraska) Salad mix, cilantro
Dec. 2012 – Jan. 2013 E. coli O157:H7 31 Shredded lettuce from Freshpoint, Inc.
Oct. 2012 E. coli O157:H7 33 Leafy greens salad mix (Massachusetts)
Apr. 2012 E. coli O157:H7 28 Romaine lettuce
Dec. 2011 Salmonella Hartford 5 Lettuce; roast beef
Dec. 2011 Norovirus 9 Lettuce, unspecified
Oct. 2011 E. coli O157:H7 58 Romaine lettuce
Oct. 2011 E. coli O157:H7 26 Lettuce
Aug. 2011 N/A 8 Lettuce; onions; tomatoes
Jul. 2011 Cyclospora cayatenensis 99 Lettuce based salads
Jun. 2011 Norovirus 23 Garden salad
Apr. 2011 Salmonella Typhimirum 36 Multiple salads
Feb. 2011 Norovirus 24 Garden salad
Jan. 2011 Norovirus 93 Lettuce; salad, unspecified
Jul.-Oct. 2010 Salmonella Java 136 Salad vegetable
May 2010 E. coli O145 33
(26 lab-confirmed)
Romaine Lettuce grown in Arizona
Apr. 2010 Salmonella Hvittingfoss 102 Lettuce, tomatoes, and olives served at Subway restaurants
Jan. 2010 E. coli 260 Lettuce grown in France
Dec. 2009 Norovirus 16 Lettuce
Aug. 2009 SalmonellaTyphimurium 27 Lettuce
Aug. 2009 Salmonella spp 124 Romaine lettuce; Recalls issued by Tanimura & Antle, Inc. (lettuce), Muranaka Farm, Inc. (parsley), and Frontera Produce (cilantro)
Jul. 2009 SalmonellaTyphimurium 145 Shredded lettuce from Taylor Farms
May. 2009 Norovirus 10 Lettuce, onion, and tomato in chicken salad
Nov. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 130 Romaine lettuce
Oct. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 2 Chopped shredded iceberg lettuce (Michigan)
Oct. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 43 (Johnathan’s Family Restaurant), 21 (Little Red Rooster Restaurant), 12 (M.T. Bellies Restaurant) Lettuce
Oct. 2008 Norovirus 64 Tomato relish, lettuce-based salad
Aug.-Sep. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 74 Lettuce  from Aunt Mid’s Produce Company (California)
Aug.-Oct. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 13 Spinach (Oregon)
May. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 10 Prepackaged lettuce
May. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 6 Pre-packaged salad
May 2008 E. coli O157:H7 9 Lettuce (California, U.S.)
Apr. 2008 Salmonella Branderup 12 Green salad, tomato
Jul. 2007 Shigella sonnei 72 Salad
Jul. 2007 E. coli O157:H7 26 Lettuce
Feb. 2007 Norovirus 8 Lettuce
Jan. 2007 Norovirus 9 Salad
Nov. 2006 E. coli O157:H7 78 Lettuce
Oct. 2006 E. coli O157:H7 205 Pre-packaged baby spinach from Dole Food Company (California)
Sep. 2006 Norovirus 9 Salad
Sep. 2005 E. coli O157:H7 34 Prepackaged bagged lettuce from Dole Food Company
Jun. 2006 SalmonellaTyphimurium 18 Lettuce, tomatoes
Oct. 2005 E. coli O157:H7 12 grapes, green; lettuce, prepackaged
Nov. 2004 E. coli O157:H7 6 Lettuce, unspecified
Jul. 2004 Salmonella Newport 97 Iceberg lettuce
Nov. 2003 E. coli O157:H7 19 Spinach, unspecified
Oct. 2003 E. coli O157:H7 16 Spinach, unspecified
Sep. 2003 E. coli O157:H7 51 Lettuce-based salads, unspecified
Nov. 2002 E. coli O157:H7 60 Romaine lettuce
Jul. 2002 E. coli O157:H7 32 Romaine lettuce from Spokane Produce (Washington)
Jul. 2002 E. coli O157:H7 55 Caesar salad
Nov. 2001 E. coli O157:H7 20 Lettuce-based salads, unspecified
Oct. 2000 E. coli O157:H7 6 Salad
May 2000 Campylobacter
jejuni
13 Salad
May 2000 Norovirus 3 Salad
Feb. 2000 Norovirus 7 Salad
Oct. 1999 E. coli O157:H7 45 Lettuce, salad
Oct. 1999 E. coli O157:H7 47 Salad
Oct. 1999 Norovirus 16 Salad
Sep. 1999 E. coli O157:H11 6 Lettuce
Sep. 1999 Norovirus 115 Lettuce
Sep. 1999 E. coli O111:H8 58 Salad
Aug. 1999 Norovirus 25 Salad
May 1999 Norovirus 28 Salad
Feb. 1999 E. coli O157:H7 72 Lettuce
May 1998 E. coli O157:H7 2 Salad
May 1996 E. coli O157:H7 61 Lettuce
Oct. 1995 E. coli O153:H46 11 Lettuce
Sep. 1995 E. coli O153:H47 30 Lettuce
Sep. 1995 E. coli O157:H7 21 Lettuce
Jul. 1995 E. coli O153:H48 74 Lettuce

 

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clarkhave represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smithand Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coliinfection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Blue Ridge Beef of Eatonton, GA, is voluntarily recalling lot#GA0131 of BRB Complete raw pet food because of the potential of contamination with Salmonellaand Listeria monocytogenes.

The cause of the recall:

This recall was initiated after samples collected and tested by the FDA showed positive for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. There has been no consumer or pet illnesses in association with this product. Blue Ridge Beef is voluntarily recalling this product lot as a commitment to consumer and pet health and safety.

About Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes:

Salmonella and Listeria can cause severe and potentially fatal infection in both the animals consuming the pet food, and the humans that handle the pet food.  There is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surface exposed to these products. Pets can be carriers of the bacteria and infect humans, even if the pets do not appear to be ill. Once Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes gets established in the pet’s gastrointestinal tract, the animal can shed the bacteria when it has a bowel movement, and the contamination will continue to spread.

Groups at high risk for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes include the elderly, people with weakened immune systems and certain chronic medical conditions (such as cancer), and pregnant women.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves and their pets for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product or pets that have consumed this product should contact their healthcare provider. Pet owners should contact a veterinarian if their pet shows symptoms. Consumers should also follow the simple handling tips on the package.

The recalled lot would affect the following states:
Florida
Georgia
South Carolina
Tennessee
North Carolina

The affected product is sold in two pound chubs that are frozen and are distinguished by the manufacturing codes:
BRB Complete
Lot# GA0131
Manufacturing date: 01/31/2018