The Dept. of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) issued a health and safety advisory due to the sale of marijuana which failed laboratory testing. The products were sold between 12/27/2018 and 12/30/2018 at HG Lansing. This recall affects the following batches of flower sold from HG Lansing – License PC-000159 located at 1116 E. Oakland Ave., Lansing MI 48906:

Citrix
1A4050100000F3D000000009
Failed for E. coli and Salmonella

Gelato
1A4050100000F3D000000010
Failed for chemical residue

Green Crack
1A4050100000F3D000000008
Failed for chemical residue and bile-tolerant gram-negative bacteria, E. coli, Salmonella and total coliforms

Oreoz
1A4050100000F3D000000023
Failed for chemical residue and E. coli and Salmonella

All affected medical marijuana has a label affixed to the container that indicates the license number of the marijuana facility that obtained the marijuana product as well as the production batch number assigned to the marijuana product. Patients or caregivers who have these affected medical marijuana products in their possession should return them to Compassionate Care by Design for proper disposal.  Compassionate Care by Design must notify patients or caregivers that purchased these medical marijuana products of the recall.

In the Spring of 2016, the CDC reported that thirty-two people infected with the outbreak strains of E. coli O157:H7 were reported from 12 states – Arizona 4, California 5, Florida 2, Illinois 1, Massachusetts 1, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 11, Virginia 2, Washington 2 and Wisconsin 1. Twelve people were hospitalized. Nine people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths were reported. Twenty-six (81%) of the 32-ill people in this outbreak were younger than 18 years. Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter manufactured by Dixie Dew was the likely source of this outbreak.

Both I.M. Healthy and Dixie Dew filed for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.  Each company paid their insurance proceeds into the Bankruptcy Court in Chicago for a total of $11,250,000.  As part of that process twenty-six people filed claim and each of their claims were valued by a Court-appointed evaluator.  The values of the cases ranged from $25,000 to $25,000,000 individually based upon the severity of the illnesses for a total of $70,000,000. Each person received a pro-rata share of $6,000,000 in October 2018.  The Court today ordered the balance, $5,250,000, to be disbursed by the Court on January 10, 2018 (The order is not yet online)

Once the Bankruptcy Court rules, the 26 claimants will continue litigation against the supply chain and retailers who sold the product.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The Public Health Agency of Canada is collaborating with provincial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), Health Canada, as well as the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S. CDC) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA), to investigate an outbreak of E. coli infections in OntarioQuebecNew Brunswick, and several U.S. states.

In Canada, based on the investigation findings to date, exposure to romaine lettuce has been identified as a source of the outbreak. Through a collaborative investigation between public health and food safety partners in Canada and the United States, traceback information indicates that the romaine lettuce consumed by the majority of the outbreak cases was harvested in California. Specifically, the U.S. FDA has indicated that the romaine lettuce was harvested in the Central Coast growing regions of northern and central California. It has been determined that romaine lettuce grown in Canada, including hydroponic romaine lettuce and romaine lettuce grown in green-houses, is not associated with this outbreak.

As of December 24, 2018 the Canadian outbreak appears to be over as there have been no illnesses linked to the Canadian investigation since mid-November. The U.S. investigation is ongoing, and public health and food safety partners will continue to collaborate and exchange information about the possible sources of contamination in the romaine lettuce harvested in the affected California growing regions outlined on the U.S. FDA’s website.

Over the last month, the CFIA has implemented import control measures to ensure that romaine lettuce from affected regions in California identified in the U.S. FDA’s investigation is not being imported into Canada. The CFIA is continuing to monitor the U.S. FDA’s investigation into the possible causes of contamination and will amend their import control measures as necessary to ensure that romaine lettuce that was harvested in the affected California growing regions as identified by the U.S. FDA. is not being imported into Canada.

Given that there have not been any Canadian illnesses since mid-November, the Public Health Agency of Canada is no longer advising residents in the affected provinces of Ontario,Quebec and New Brunswick to avoid eating romaine lettuce and salad mixes containing romaine lettuce.

Retailers and industry partners continue to bring romaine lettuce into the Canadian marketplace from growing regions not associated with the outbreak and to help consumers easily identify the origin of romaine lettuce in the Canadian marketplace. Given the U.S. outbreak is still ongoing, Canadians who are traveling to the U.S., or who shop for groceries across the border and purchase romaine lettuce in the U.S. are advised to follow the U.S. CDC’s advice for U.S. consumers found on their website.

This investigation marks the third E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce in the last year. Although the outbreak appears to be over, the Government of Canada remains vigilant in its efforts to monitor for any new E. coli illnesses linked to romaine lettuce. If future risks are identified, the Public Health Agency of Canada and its partners will take the necessary steps to notify Canadians of any increased risk to their health and to provide advice on how to prevent illness.

In Canada, as of December 24, 2018, there have been 29 confirmed cases of E. coli illness investigated in Ontario (5), Quebec (20), New Brunswick (1), and British Columbia (3). The illnesses in British Columbia were related to travel to QuebecOntario and the United States. Individuals became sick between mid-October and mid-November 2018. Ten individuals have been hospitalized, and two individuals suffered from hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is a severe complication that can result from an E. coli infection. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 2 and 93 years of age. The majority of cases (52%) are female. Most of the individuals who became sick reported eating romaine lettuce before their illnesses occurred. Individuals reported eating romaine lettuce at home, as well as in prepared salads purchased at grocery stores, or from menu items ordered at restaurants and fast food chains.

Laboratory analysis indicates that the illnesses reported in this outbreak are genetically related to illnesses reported in a previous E. coli outbreak from December 2017 that affected consumers in both Canada and the U.S. This tells us that the same strain of E. coli is causing illness in Canada and the US as was seen in 2017 and it suggests there may be a reoccurring source of contamination. Investigators are using evidence collected in both outbreaks to help identify the possible cause of the contamination in these events.

Wegmans Food Markets, Inc. has issued a voluntary recall of fresh Cauliflower Rice, Veggie Cauliflower Rice Blend and Stir-Fry Mix with Cauliflower, sold in the produce department between 12/7/18 and 12/18/18, because it may be contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria (E. Coli O157:H7). E. coli O157:H7 causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly. The condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

The recalled products (with use-by dates of 12/11/18 through 12/22/18) are as follows:

Wegmans Cauliflower Rice, 1 lb. pkg. UPC #25313500000
Wegmans Cauliflower Rice, 8 oz. pkg. UPC #25307200000
Wegmans Stir Fry Blend (with cauliflower), 1 lb. pkg. UPC #25335800000
Wegmans Veggie (cauliflower) Rice Blend (sold by the pound), UPC #253162000000

The recalled products were distributed to 98 Wegmans stores in N.Y., N.J., Pa., Md., Va. and Mass.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated by Produce Packaging, Inc. based in Cleveland, OH, which supplies these products to Wegmans and notified Wegmans that the product may have been contaminated.

Wegmans has placed automated phone calls to customers who purchased the product using their Shoppers Club card.

Spokane Produce Inc. of Spokane, WA initiates a voluntary recall of sandwiches containing green leaf lettuce and foodservice lettuce filets following notice of a produce industry ingredient recall by Adam Bros. Farming Inc. Sandwich products bearing the Northwest Cuisine Creations and Fresh&Local labels. These products are recalled because they may be contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria (E. coli O157:H7). E. coli O157:H7 causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly. The condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

All sandwiches bear the “best buy” dating 12/14/18-12/21/18. The product was distributed to grocery markets in Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and Oregon. In addition, Green Leaf Filets (no label) in five(5) and ten(10) pound containers are being recalled from foodservice accounts.

Recalled Product Net Wt. UPC Brand Best Buy Dates Range
Italian Hoagie 7.7 oz 88694 79803 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Turkey-Bacon-Cheddar 7.4 oz 88694 79804 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Turkey Swiss 6.5 oz 88694 79806 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Ham & Cheeese 6.5 oz 88694 79807 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Roast Beef w/Pepper Jack 7.7 oz 88694 79808 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Club Sandwich 6.5 oz 88694 79809 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Tuscan Turkey 7 oz 88694 79814 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Tuscan Ham 7 oz 88694 79815 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Turkey Hoagie w/Avocado Spread 7 oz 88694 79816 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Roast Beef Hoagie 7 oz. 88794 79817 Northwest Cuisine Creations 12/14/18-12/21/18
Italian Hoagie 7.7 oz 88694 79803 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18
Turkey-Bacon-Cheddar 7.4 oz 88694 79804 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18
Ham & Cheese 6.5 oz 88694 79807 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18
Turkey Swiss 6.5 oz 88694 79806 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18
Tuscan Turkey 7 oz 88694 79814 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18
Tuscan Ham 7 oz 88694 79815 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18
Turkey Hoagie w/Avacado Spread 7 oz 88694 79816 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18
Club Sandwich 6.5 oz 88694 79809 Fresh & Local 12/14/18-12/21/18

The affected products distributed by Spokane Produce include green leaf lettuce that was originated and recalled from Adam Bros. Farming Inc. of Santa Maria, CA. The recall was initiated after it was discovered that sediment from a reservoir near where the Adam Bros. Farm produce was grown tested positive for E.coli O157:H7. Filtered and treated water from the reservoir may have come in contact with the produce after it was harvested. None of the filtered, treated water has tested positive for E. coli, all E. coli tests returning negative.

“We are taking extreme precautionary measures,” notes Dan Petek, Spokane Produce spokesperson. “To date, there have been no cases of E coli or contamination from any Adam Bros. green leaf lettuce. In complete regard for the public at large and our customers, we believe it is prudent at this point to be proactive and call in all product.”

Out of an abundance of caution, as a service to the general consuming public at large, product is being recalled in consultation with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). No illnesses have been reported to date.

Consumers who purchased any of the sandwiches bearing the “best buy 12/14/18-12/21/18” are advised not to eat any product and should destroy or return the product to the place of purchase.

Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. of Santa Maria, California is recalling red leaf lettuce, green leaf lettuce and cauliflower harvested on November 27 through 30, 2018 out of an abundance of caution, because it may be contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria (E. coli O157:H7).

Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. feels a strong commitment to its customers and has worked for years to provide a safe and healthy food supply. Out of an abundance of caution, Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. is initiating this voluntary recall in cooperation with the FDA. The recall involves produce harvested between November 27, 2018 and November 30, 2018, grown in particular fields. It does not involve all of Adam Bros. Farming, Inc.’s products.

As of 12/13/2018 Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. has notified its effected customers of all product that was recalled, asking that the product not be eaten, sold, or transferred. Furthermore, Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. asked that its customers notify the downline chain of custody to insure a full recall.

Cauliflower was distributed to wholesalers in AZ, CA, IL, LA, MD, NC, NJ, NY, OH, PA. Tijuana, Mexico, and Canada ; red and green leaf lettuce was distributed to wholesalers in CA, CO, OR, TX, PA, WA, and Canada; red leaf lettuce only was distributed to a wholesaler in MN, and Tijuana, Mexico.

Recalled product may be identified as follows:

Red Leaf Lettuce – Adam Bros. Family Farms Label: Carton Tag Numbers:

204-27245 331-18, 253-27267 331-18, 204-27267 331-18, 203-27267 331-18, 253-27267 332- 18, 204-27267 332-18

Pallet Tag Numbers: 1635961,1635962,1635977,1635978,1635979,1635980,1635981,1635982,1635983,1635984,163 5985,
635986,1635988,1635989,1635990,1635991,1636104,1636105,1636106,1636107,1636108,1636 109, 1636110,1636111,1636120,1636121,1636173,1636174,1636175,1636176,1636177,1636178,163 6179, 1636187,1636188,1636189,1636190,1636234,1636235,1636236,1636237,1636238,1636239,163 6240, 1636241,1636242,1636243,1636297,1636298,1636299,1636300,1636301,1636302,1636303,163 6304, 1636305,1636306,1636376,1636377,1636378,1636379,1636380,1636381,1636382,1636492,163 6493, 1636494,1636495,1636496,1636497,1636498,1636499,1636500

Green Leaf Lettuce – Adam Bros. Family Farms Label: Carton Tag Numbers:

204-27247 331-18, 253-27268 331-18, 204-27268 331-18, 204-27268 331-18, 204-27268 332- 18

Pallet Tag Numbers: 1635842,1635843,1635844,1635845,1635846,1635847,1635848,1635849,1635850,1635851,163 5872, 1635873,1635874,1635875,1635876,1635877,1635878,1635879,1635880,1635881,1635951,163 5952, 1635953,1635954,1635955,1635956,1635957,1635958,1635959,1635960,1635963,1635964,163 5965, 1635966,1635967,1635968,1635969,1635970,1635971,1635972,1635973,1635974,1635975,163 5976, 1636062,1636063,1636064,1636065,1636066,1636067,1636068,1636069,1636070,1636071,163 6101, 1636102,1636103,1636112,1636113,1636114,1636115,1636116,1636117,1636118,1636119,163 6180, 1636181,1636182,1636183,1636184,1636185,1636186,1636373,1636374,1636375,1636501,163 6502, 1636503,1636504,1636505,1636506,1636507,1636508,1636509

Cauliflower – Adam Bros. Family Farms Label: Carton Tag Numbers:

203-27263 331-18, 203-27263 333-18, 203-27263 334-18, 204-27268 332-18, 203-27268 334- 18, 203-27263 332-18, 203-27263 334-18

Pallet Tag Numbers: 1635882,1635883,1635884,1635885,1636072,1636073,1636074,1636075,1636076,1636140,163 6141, 1636142,1636143,1636307,1636308,1636309,1636310,1636314,1636593,1636594,1636595,163 6596,
1636597,1636598,1636599,1636600,1636601,1636716,1636717,1636718,1636719,1636720,163 6924, 1636925,1636926,1636927,1637046,1637047,1637170,1637171,1635886,1635887,1636077,163 6078, 1636144,1636145,1636311,1636312,1636602,1636603,1636604,1636605,1636721,1636722,163 6928, 1636929,1637048,1637049,1637172,1637173,1635888,1636079,1636146,1636313,1636606,163 6607, 1636723,1636930,1637050,1637174

The recall was initiated after it was discovered that sediment from a reservoir near where the produce was grown tested positive for E. coli O157:H7. Filtered and treated water from the reservoir may have come in contact with the produce after it was harvested. None of the filtered, treated water has tested positive for E. coli, all E. coli tests returning negative. This bacteria may cause a diarrheal illness from which most healthy adults can recover completely within a week. Some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly. The condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

Where is the FDA “Water Rule” when you need it?

Also, 2018 E. coli Outbreak is linked genetically to 2017 E. coli Outbreak.

Since the last CDC update on December 6, an additional 7 ill people have been included in this investigation.

Fifty-nine people infected with the outbreak strain of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 15 states and the District of Columbia.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from October 5, 2018 to November 16, 2018.

Twenty-three people have been hospitalized, including two people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

The Public Health Agency of Canada has identified ill people infected with the same DNA fingerprint of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria in Canada. In Canada, as of December 6, 2018, there have been 27 confirmed cases of E. coli illness investigated in Ontario (4), Quebec (19), New Brunswick (1), and British Columbia (3). The illnesses in British Columbia were related to travel to Quebec, Ontario and the United States. Individuals became sick between mid-October and early November 2018. Nine individuals have been hospitalized, and two individuals suffered from hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is a severe complication that can result from an E. coli infection. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 2 and 93 years of age. The majority of cases (52%) are male.

The FDA, along with CDC and state partners, is investigating farms and cooling facilities in California that were identified in traceback. CDC identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 in sediment collected within an agricultural water reservoir on Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. farm, which was identified in traceback.

CDC is advising that consumers not eat any romaine lettuce harvested from Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Barbara counties in the Central Coastal growing regions of northern and central California. FDA continues its investigation of farms identified in traceback.

Laboratory analysis indicates that the illnesses reported in this outbreak are genetically related to illnesses reported in a previous E. coli outbreak from December 2017 that affected consumers in both Canada and the U.S. This tells us that the same strain of E. coli is causing illness in Canada and the US as was seen in 2017 and it suggests there may be a reoccurring source of contamination. Investigators are using evidence collected in both outbreaks to help identify the possible cause of the contamination in these events.  Twenty-five people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O157:H7 were reported from 15 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from November 5, 2017 to December 12, 2017. Nine people were hospitalized, including two people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. One death was reported from California.

In December 2017, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) investigated an outbreak of STEC O157:H7 infections in several provinces linked to romaine lettuce. In total, there were 42 cases of E. coli O157 illness reported in five eastern provinces: Ontario (8), Quebec (15), New Brunswick (5), Nova Scotia (1), and Newfoundland and Labrador (13). Individuals became sick in November and early December 2017. Seventeen individuals were hospitalized. One individual died. Individuals who became ill were between the ages of 3 and 85 years of age. The majority of cases (74%) were female.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne KinerStephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, Canada, and the FDA are investigating a multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) infections.

As of December 6, 2018, 52 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 15 states. CA (11), CT (1), FL (1), IL (2), LA (1), MA (1), MD (1), MI (7), NH (6), NJ (11), NY (6), OH (1), PA (1), RI (1), WI (1)

Illnesses started on dates ranging from October 5, 2018 to November 18, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 84 years, with a median age of 30. Sixty-nine percent of ill people are female. Of 45 people with information available, 19 (42%) have been hospitalized, including two people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). No deaths have been reported.

The Public Health Agency of Canada has identified 27 ill people infected with the same DNA fingerprint of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria in Canada. In Canada, as of December 6, 2018, there have been 27 confirmed cases of E. coli illness investigated in Ontario (4), Quebec (19), New Brunswick (1), and British Columbia (3). The illnesses in British Columbia were related to travel to Quebec, Ontario and the United States. Individuals became sick between mid-October and early November 2018. Nine individuals have been hospitalized, and two individuals suffered from hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is a severe complication that can result from an E. coli infection. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 2 and 93 years of age. The majority of cases (52%) are male.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicates that romaine lettuce from the Central Coastal growing regions of northern and central California is a likely source of this outbreak.

Preliminary traceback information from the FDA indicates that ill people in this outbreak ate romaine lettuce harvested from the Central Coastal growing regions of northern and central California. The specific California counties FDA identified in the traceback investigation are Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, and Ventura. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand of romaine lettuce has been identified.

The FDA, along with CDC and state partners, is investigating farms and cooling facilities in California that were identified in traceback. CDC collected samples of water to test for E. coli O157:H7; these test results are pending.

Ill people in this outbreak were infected with E. coli bacteria with the same DNA fingerprint as the E. coli strain isolated from ill people in a 2017 outbreak linked to leafy greens in the United States and to romaine lettuce in Canada. The current outbreak is not related to a spring 2018 multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections linked to romaine lettuce.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Mountain Man Market of Cana, VA is recalling its ½ gallon containers of Apple Cider because they have the potential to be contaminated with shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli.  Shiga toxin E. coli causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly; the condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

The recalled Apple Cider was distributed locally at the Mountain Man Market on and before November 10, 2018.

The product comes in a clear ½ gallon container, labeled as Mountain Man Apple Cider,  Warning: this product has not been pasteurized and therefore may contain harmful bacteria that can cause serious illness in children, the elderly and persons with weaken immune systems.

The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Division of Consolidated Laboratories (DCLS) detected the presence of shiga-toxin producing E. coli.

VDACS and Mountain Man Market will continue their investigation as to the cause of the problem though the seasonal production of the apple cider has ended for this year.

There is concern that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Sorry Canada

As of November 23, 2018, there have been 22 confirmed cases of E. coli illness investigated in Ontario (4), Quebec (17), and New Brunswick (1). Individuals became sick between mid-October and early November 2018. Eight individuals have been hospitalized, and one individual suffered from hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is a severe complication that can result from an E. coli infection. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 5 and 93 years of age. The cases are evenly distributed among male and female individuals.

Most of the individuals who became sick reported eating romaine lettuce before their illnesses occurred. Individuals reported eating romaine lettuce at home, as well as in prepared salads purchased at grocery stores, or from menu items ordered at restaurants and fast food chains.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is working with public health officials and the U.S. FDA to determine the source of the romaine lettuce that ill individuals were exposed to. As part of the food safety investigation, romaine lettuce is being sampled and tested. To date, all products that have been tested have been negative for E. coli. As no contaminated product has been found in the marketplace and the source of the contamination has not been identified, there have been no product recalls in Canada or the U.S associated with this outbreak. If a specific brand or source of romaine lettuce is identified in Canada the CFIA will take the necessary steps to protect the public, including recalling the product as required.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne KinerStephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.