Foodborne Illness Outbreaks

Where is the FDA “Water Rule” when you need it?

Also, 2018 E. coli Outbreak is linked genetically to 2017 E. coli Outbreak.

Since the last CDC update on December 6, an additional 7 ill people have been included in this investigation.

Fifty-nine people infected with the outbreak strain of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 15 states and the District of Columbia.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from October 5, 2018 to November 16, 2018.

Twenty-three people have been hospitalized, including two people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

The Public Health Agency of Canada has identified ill people infected with the same DNA fingerprint of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria in Canada. In Canada, as of December 6, 2018, there have been 27 confirmed cases of E. coli illness investigated in Ontario (4), Quebec (19), New Brunswick (1), and British Columbia (3). The illnesses in British Columbia were related to travel to Quebec, Ontario and the United States. Individuals became sick between mid-October and early November 2018. Nine individuals have been hospitalized, and two individuals suffered from hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is a severe complication that can result from an E. coli infection. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 2 and 93 years of age. The majority of cases (52%) are male.

The FDA, along with CDC and state partners, is investigating farms and cooling facilities in California that were identified in traceback. CDC identified the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 in sediment collected within an agricultural water reservoir on Adam Bros. Farming, Inc. farm, which was identified in traceback.

CDC is advising that consumers not eat any romaine lettuce harvested from Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Barbara counties in the Central Coastal growing regions of northern and central California. FDA continues its investigation of farms identified in traceback.

Laboratory analysis indicates that the illnesses reported in this outbreak are genetically related to illnesses reported in a previous E. coli outbreak from December 2017 that affected consumers in both Canada and the U.S. This tells us that the same strain of E. coli is causing illness in Canada and the US as was seen in 2017 and it suggests there may be a reoccurring source of contamination. Investigators are using evidence collected in both outbreaks to help identify the possible cause of the contamination in these events.  Twenty-five people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O157:H7 were reported from 15 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from November 5, 2017 to December 12, 2017. Nine people were hospitalized, including two people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. One death was reported from California.

In December 2017, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) investigated an outbreak of STEC O157:H7 infections in several provinces linked to romaine lettuce. In total, there were 42 cases of E. coli O157 illness reported in five eastern provinces: Ontario (8), Quebec (15), New Brunswick (5), Nova Scotia (1), and Newfoundland and Labrador (13). Individuals became sick in November and early December 2017. Seventeen individuals were hospitalized. One individual died. Individuals who became ill were between the ages of 3 and 85 years of age. The majority of cases (74%) were female.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne KinerStephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

An additional 87 ill people from 16 states were included in this investigation since the last update on November 15, 2018. States with newly reported illnesses include: Michigan, Mississippi, and West Virginia.

As of December 12, 2018, 333 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport have been reported from 28 states.Illnesses started on dates ranging from August 5, 2018 to November 9, 2018.

91 people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that ground beef produced by JBS Tolleson, Inc. is a likely source of this outbreak.

On October 4, 2018, JBS Tolleson, Inc. recalled approximately 6.9 million pounds of beef products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Newport. On December 4, 2018, JBS Tolleson, Inc. recalled an additional 5.2 million pounds of beef products.

Personally, as I said to the Los Angeles Times some time ago, “I think that anything that can poison or kill a person should be listed as an adulterant [in food].”  Ignoring Salmonella in meat makes little, if any, sense. Even after the Court’s twisted opinion in Supreme Beef v. USDA, where it found Salmonella “not an adulterant per se, meaning its presence does not require the USDA to refuse to stamp such meat ‘inspected and passed,” our government’s failure to confront the reality of Salmonella, especially antibiotic-resistant Salmonella, is inexcusable.  The Wisconsin Supreme Court in Kriefall v Excel called it as it saw it:

The E. coli strain that killed Brianna and made the others sick is a “deleterious substance which may render [meat] injurious to health.” There is no dispute about this. Thus, under the first part of 21 U.S.C. § 601(m)(1), meat that either “bears or contains” E. coli O157:H7 (the “deleterious substance”) is “adulterated.” That E. coli O157:H7 contamination can be rendered non-“injurious to health” by cooking thoroughly, as discussed below, does not negate this; Congress used the phrase “may render,” not “in every circumstance renders.” Moreover, if the E. coli bacteria is not considered to be “an added substance,” because it comes from some of the animals themselves and is not either applied or supplied during the slaughtering process (although we do not decide this), it cannot be said that the E. coli strain “does not ordinarily render [the meat on or in which it appears] injurious to health.” Accordingly, meat contaminated by E. coli O157:H7 is also “adulterated” under the second part of § 601(m)(1).

Now, why would Salmonella be different? According to the CDC, it is estimated that 1.4 million cases of salmonellosis occur each year in the U.S. Of those cases, 95 percent are related to foodborne causes.  Approximately 220 of each 1000 cases result in hospitalization, and 8 of every 1000 cases result in death.  About 500 to 1,000 deaths – 31 percent of all food-related deaths – are caused by Salmonella infections each year. So, where do we stand with the existing USDA/FSIS law on adulteration?  Here is the law:

21 U.S.C. § 601(m)(4) – SUBCHAPTER I – INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS; ADULTERATION AND MISBRANDING – CHAPTER 12 – MEAT INSPECTION – TITLE 21—FOOD AND DRUGS

(m) The term “adulterated” shall apply to any carcass, part thereof, meat or meat food product under one or more of the following circumstances:

(1) if it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to health; but in case the substance is not an added substance, such article shall not be considered adulterated under this clause if the quantity of such substance in or on such article does not ordinarily render it injurious to health; …

(3) if it consists in whole or in part of any filthyputrid, or decomposed substance or is for any other reason unsound, unhealthfulunwholesome, or otherwise unfit for human food;

(4) if it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health; …

Hmmm. It is hard to read the above and not think that the words in bold equate to all E. coli and Salmonella (frankly, all pathogens in food).  I know, I am just a lawyer, but don’t ya think that when food with animal feces (and a dash of E. coli O157:H7) in it is considered an adulterant, that other animal feces (with dashes of other pathogens, like Salmonella) in them, should be considered adulterated too?  But, hey, that is just me. Another odd governmental fact is that the FDA does not seem to make a distinction between pathogens it considers adulterants or not.  FDA’s enabling legislation – Sec. 402. [21 USC §342] of the Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act also defines “Adulterated Food” as food that is: 

(a) Poisonous, insanitary, or deleterious ingredients.

(1) If it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to health; but in case the substance is not an added substance such food shall not be considered adulterated under this clause if the quantity of such substance in such food does not ordinarily render it injurious to health;

(2) If it bears or contains any added poisonous or added deleterious substance … that is unsafe within the meaning of section 406;

(3) if it consists in whole or in part of any filthy, putrid, or decomposed substance, or if it is otherwise unfit for food;

(4) if it has been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions whereby it may have become contaminated with filth, or whereby it may have been rendered injurious to health …

It would be interesting, and perhaps entertaining, to have House and Senate hearings focusing on what should and should not be considered adulterants in our food.  I can see panels of scientists from various fields, FDA, USDA and FSIS officials, beef and produce industry representatives and consumers discussing this.  I would pay to watch it.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritisor Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

HONOLULU, Hawaii – In October a preliminary settlement of $4,500,000 was reached on behalf of those exposed to Hepatitis A in correlation to Genki Sushi Restaurants. The court has extended the deadline for class members to submit a claim form to February 15, 2019. The class is represented by Marler Clark, the food safety law firm, Perkin and Faria, and Starn, O’Toole, Marcus, and Fisher, respected Hawaii firms.

Genki-Stipulation for Order to Amend Proposed Notice Plan filed 12.11.18

Genki-Order Approving Stipulation to Amend Proposed Notice Plan filed 12.11.18

Class members will be emailed and mailed a notice of settlement. Claim forms are also available at https://hawaiihepa.com or by calling 1-800-532-9250.

The class is defined as follows:

All persons who: (1) as a result of the 2016 Hepatitis A Outbreak infections linked to consuming food at thirteen Genki Sushi restaurants located on the islands of Oahu, Kauai, and Maui, were exposed to the hepatitis A virus (“HAV”) through one of three exposure-mechanisms (defined in the Exposure Subclasses), but did not become infected, and (2) as a result of such exposure, after learning of the requirement of treatment from an announcement of public health officials or a medical professional, obtained preventative medical treatment within 14 days of exposure, such as receiving immune globulin (“IG”), HAV vaccine, or blood test.

The preliminary settlement covers three subclasses:

(1) individuals who had direct contact with one of the 292 people identified by the Hawaii Department of Health as infected with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV).

(2) individuals who were exposed to HAV between August 1 and August 16 as a result of consuming food at one of the Genki Sushi restaurants implicated in the 2016 outbreak.

(3) individuals who ate at secondary restaurants reported by the Hawaiian Department of Health where infected Genki Sushi customers were employed.

Qualified claimants will be entitled to compensation as follows:

  • $350.00 for each member of Subclass 1.
  • $250.00 for each member of Subclass 2.
  • $150.00 for each member of Subclass 3.

The final hearing for approval of the class settlement is now March 6, 2019.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s food safety law firm representing victims of Hepatitis A outbreaks. The Hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Hepatitis A lawyers have litigated Hepatitis A cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of sources, such as green onions, lettuce and restaurant food. The law firm has brought Hepatitis A lawsuits against such companies as Costco, Chi-Chi’s, Chipotle, Olive Garden, Taco Bell, Townsend Farms, Tropical Smoothie, Subway, McDonald’s, Red Robin, Chipotle, Quiznos and Carl’s Jr.  We proudly represented the family of Donald Rockwell, who died after consuming hepatitis A tainted food and Richard Miller, who required a liver transplant after eating food at a Chi-Chi’s restaurant.

As of December 7, 2018, this outbreak investigation is over.

A total of 25 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- were reported from six states.

Eleven people were hospitalized, including one death reported from New York.

Kosher chicken products were contaminated with Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- and made people sick.

In interviews, ill people reported eating kosher chicken, and when asked about the specific brand eaten, several people reported Empire Kosher brand.

The outbreak strain was also identified in samples of raw chicken collected from two facilities, including one facility that processes Empire Kosher brand chicken.

The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, Canada, and the FDA are investigating a multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) infections.

As of December 6, 2018, 52 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 15 states. CA (11), CT (1), FL (1), IL (2), LA (1), MA (1), MD (1), MI (7), NH (6), NJ (11), NY (6), OH (1), PA (1), RI (1), WI (1)

Illnesses started on dates ranging from October 5, 2018 to November 18, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 84 years, with a median age of 30. Sixty-nine percent of ill people are female. Of 45 people with information available, 19 (42%) have been hospitalized, including two people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). No deaths have been reported.

The Public Health Agency of Canada has identified 27 ill people infected with the same DNA fingerprint of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria in Canada. In Canada, as of December 6, 2018, there have been 27 confirmed cases of E. coli illness investigated in Ontario (4), Quebec (19), New Brunswick (1), and British Columbia (3). The illnesses in British Columbia were related to travel to Quebec, Ontario and the United States. Individuals became sick between mid-October and early November 2018. Nine individuals have been hospitalized, and two individuals suffered from hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), which is a severe complication that can result from an E. coli infection. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 2 and 93 years of age. The majority of cases (52%) are male.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicates that romaine lettuce from the Central Coastal growing regions of northern and central California is a likely source of this outbreak.

Preliminary traceback information from the FDA indicates that ill people in this outbreak ate romaine lettuce harvested from the Central Coastal growing regions of northern and central California. The specific California counties FDA identified in the traceback investigation are Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, and Ventura. At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand of romaine lettuce has been identified.

The FDA, along with CDC and state partners, is investigating farms and cooling facilities in California that were identified in traceback. CDC collected samples of water to test for E. coli O157:H7; these test results are pending.

Ill people in this outbreak were infected with E. coli bacteria with the same DNA fingerprint as the E. coli strain isolated from ill people in a 2017 outbreak linked to leafy greens in the United States and to romaine lettuce in Canada. The current outbreak is not related to a spring 2018 multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections linked to romaine lettuce.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

An additional 126 ill people from 13 states were included in this investigation since the last update on October 23, 2018. Three more states reported ill people: Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Missouri. Most illnesses in Arizona, California, Colorado and Texas.

As of November 15, 2018, 246 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport have been reported from 25 states.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from August 5, 2018 to October 16, 2018.

Fifty-nine people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicates that ground beef produced by JBS Tolleson, Inc. is a likely source of this outbreak.

On October 4, 2018, JBS Tolleson, Inc. recalled approximately 6.9 million pounds of beef products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Newport. On December 4, 2018, JBS Tolleson, Inc. recalled an additional 5.2 million pounds of beef products.

Do not eat, serve, or sell recalled beef products, including ground beef, that were recalled by JBS Tolleson, Inc., of Tolleson, Arizona, because they may be contaminated with Salmonella. The company recalled 6.9 million pounds of beef products on Oct. 4, 2018.

Recalled beef products were produced and packaged from July 26, 2018, to September 7, 2018 and were shipped to retailers nationwide under many brand names.

Check your freezer for recalled beef. Look for beef labeled with the establishment number “EST. 267.” This is usually found inside the USDA mark of inspection, but can be elsewhere on the package.

More than 100 retailers, including chain retail locations and local stores, sold the recalled beef. Stores are listed by state, in alphabetical order. Visit the USDA-FSIS website for a list of stores and states where the recalled beef products were sold[PDF – 322 KB].

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

JBS Tolleson, Inc., a Tolleson, Ariz. establishment, is recalling approximately 12,093,271 pounds of non-intact raw beef products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Newport, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The raw, non-intact beef items, including ground beef, were packaged on various dates from July 26, 2018 to Sept. 7, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [Products List (PDF) | Product Labels (PDF only)|

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 267” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to a retail locations and institutions nationwide.

After FSIS Recall 085-2018 on October 4, 2018, FSIS, CDC, and state public health and agriculture partners continued to investigate the outbreak of Salmonella Newport illnesses. The epidemiological investigation has identified 246 confirmed case-patients from 26 states with illness onset dates ranging from July 26 to September 7, 2018. An additional 16 case-patients have provided receipts or shopper card numbers for the product traceback investigations. Specific traceback for three case-patients have identified JBS Tolleson, Inc., EST. 267 ground beef products that were not part of the October 4, 2018 recall. FSIS will continue to work with public health partners and provide updated information should it become available.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days. Most people recover without treatment. In some persons, however, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact their health care provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

Saranac Brand Foods, a Saranac-based food processing company – where safety inspectors found unsanitary conditions, including listeria bacteria – is shutting down after federal attorneys requested that the company cease operations until it complies with food safety rules, according to court documents filed Thursday.

The filing came on the same day as attorneys representing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services filed a complaint in federal court in Grand Rapids asking a judge to grant a permanent injunction prohibiting the company from operating until it fixed its compliance issues.

The complaint documented numerous issues discovered by food safety inspectors during a Nov. 29, 2017 inspection at the facility, including the presence of listeria bacteria, which can cause fever and diarrhea. It also stated that inspectors witnessed employees spaying off a soiled food cart, causing “spray to be deflected onto an uncovered food car containing coleslaw,” as well as employees failing to wash their hands before handling food and food-contact equipment.

The company, under its legal filing, agreed to a consent decree under which it cannot again operate at its facility until it develops a listeria monitoring program, creates a food safety employee training program, and meets other training and safety requirements.

Listeria:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clarkhave represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as deli meat, cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeriainfection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The Cracker Barrel restaurant near I-94 and S. 9th St. is voluntarily closing its’ doors for good following a salmonella outbreak investigation.

The Kalamazoo County Health & Community Services Department (HCS), along with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) began investigating the location in June 2018 for health code violations and reports of food borne illnesses. HCS officials said the establishment voluntarily closed in June to begin facility renovations and worked with them to ensure all Michigan Food Law requirements were met to reopen.

On Tuesday November 27th, a salmonella diagnosis prompted a test by state officials and on Wednesday, 28th HCS received a letter from Cracker Barrel Corporate indicating they would close their Kalamazoo location permanently. HCS officials said the final voluntary closure was in response to environmental preliminary test results from Cracker Barrel’s private testing firm indicating that significant salmonella contamination was found. The state’s test results are expected next week.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clarkhave represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonellainfection, including Reactive Arthritisor Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Mountain Man Market of Cana, VA is recalling its ½ gallon containers of Apple Cider because they have the potential to be contaminated with shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli.  Shiga toxin E. coli causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly; the condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death.

The recalled Apple Cider was distributed locally at the Mountain Man Market on and before November 10, 2018.

The product comes in a clear ½ gallon container, labeled as Mountain Man Apple Cider,  Warning: this product has not been pasteurized and therefore may contain harmful bacteria that can cause serious illness in children, the elderly and persons with weaken immune systems.

The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the Division of Consolidated Laboratories (DCLS) detected the presence of shiga-toxin producing E. coli.

VDACS and Mountain Man Market will continue their investigation as to the cause of the problem though the seasonal production of the apple cider has ended for this year.

There is concern that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.