The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS), along with the Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP), local health departments, and federal partners, is working to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections linked to cantaloupes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 117 people in the U.S. have been infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella. This includes at least 10 people from Wisconsin.

Several cantaloupes and cantaloupe-containing products have been recalled recently due to suspicion of Salmonella contamination, including:

  • Whole fresh cantaloupes with a label that says “Malichita”, “4050”, and “Product of Mexico/produit du Mexique” sold between October 16 and October 23.
  • ALDI cantaloupe, cut cantaloupe, and pineapple spears in clamshell packaging with best-by dates between October 27 and October 31.

Find more information about products affected by this recall and where they were sold on the DHS Outbreaks in Wisconsin webpage.

Anyone who purchased recalled cantaloupe products is advised to not eat them and to throw them away along with any food that may be packaged with the cantaloupe (for example: fruit salad). This includes any fresh fruit that was frozen for later use. If you ate any recalled cantaloupe and are experiencing symptoms of salmonellosis, contact a doctor right away. Let them know you may have been in contact with Salmonella. Signs and symptoms of Salmonella infection include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting that lasts for several days.

Salmonellosis, or Salmonella infection, is caused by Salmonella bacteria that are spread by eating or drinking contaminated food or water, or by direct or indirect contact with fecal matter from infected people or animals. Salmonella is a common cause of diarrheal illness, though in rare cases, it can cause bloodstream infections. Children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems may have more serious symptoms. Though most people will recover from salmonellosis on their own, some people may require extra fluids to prevent dehydration.

Print:
Email this postTweet this postLike this postShare this post on LinkedIn
Photo of Drew Falkenstein Drew Falkenstein

Drew Falkenstein joined Marler Clark in January, 2004 and has concentrated his practice in representing victims of foodborne illness. He has litigated nationwide against some of the biggest food corporations in the world, including Dole, Kellogg’s, and McDonald’s.  He has worked on landmark…

Drew Falkenstein joined Marler Clark in January, 2004 and has concentrated his practice in representing victims of foodborne illness. He has litigated nationwide against some of the biggest food corporations in the world, including Dole, Kellogg’s, and McDonald’s.  He has worked on landmark cases that have helped shape food safety policy, HACCP protocol, and consumer rights, such as the E. coli outbreak in fresh spinach in 2006 and the 2008 Peanut Corporation of America outbreak of Salmonella. A frequent speaker for the not-for-profit organization Outbreak, Inc, Mr. Falkenstein travels the country to address public and environmental health organizations as well as food safety meetings and annual educational conferences.  He speaks on the intersection of law and public health, and addresses companies on how to prevent food borne illness outbreaks.