Life Raft Treats is recalling Not Fried Chicken buckets, Not Fried Chicken bars and Life Is Peachy box ice cream products because of potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

On Sept. 5, 2023, the firm was notified by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) that their Not Fried Chicken ice cream treat tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes. The firm also recalled their Life Is Peachy Ice Cream treats because both products were manufactured in the same room.

These products were packaged in lamented buckets and plastic wrap and shipped to Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, North Carolina, New York, South Carolina and Texas distribution centers. The product was also shipped online directly to consumers located in all fifty states plus the District of Columbia.

Recalled products:

ProductSizeUPCUse By Dates
LIFE RAFT TREATS LIFE IS PEACHY6 COUNTNO UPC CODEUp to andincludingBEST BYAUG 8212024
LIFE RAFT TREATSNOT FRIED CHICKENICE CREAM64 OZ BUCKETNO UPC CODEUp to andincludingBEST BYAUG 8212024
LIFE RAFT TREATSNOT FRIED CHICKENICE CREAM2.5 OZ BAR8 60006 18210 6Up to andincludingBEST BYAUG 8212024

As of the posting of this recall, no illnesses have been reported to date.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them and to return the products to the place of purchase for a full refund or they may discard the product. 

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Photo of Bruce Clark Bruce Clark

Bruce Clark is a partner in Marler Clark. In 1993, Bruce became involved in foodborne illness litigation as an attorney for Jack in the Box restaurants in its E. coli O157:H7 personal injury litigation. The Jack in the Box litigation spanned more than…

Bruce Clark is a partner in Marler Clark. In 1993, Bruce became involved in foodborne illness litigation as an attorney for Jack in the Box restaurants in its E. coli O157:H7 personal injury litigation. The Jack in the Box litigation spanned more than four years and involved more than 100 lawsuits in four states. Since that time, Bruce has been continuously involved in food and waterborne illness litigation involving bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents in settings ranging from large scale outbreaks to individual cases. He has extensive expertise in the medical, microbiological, and epidemiological aspects of foodborne illness cases gleaned from more than a decade of working with leading experts across the country. Bruce frequently speaks to public health groups as well as food industry groups about the realities of foodborne illness litigation and efforts that can help avoid the damage foodborne pathogens inflict.