The state of New York is warning people to not consume unpasteurized raw milk from Churchtown Dairy due to possible contamination of Listeria Monocytogenes.

On Friday, the state Department of Agriculture & Markets notified the dairy farm that a presumptive positive detection for Listeria was made from a bottled milk sample pulled from the dairy’s cooler on July 22. Listeria Monocytogenes is a species of bacteria that can cause the infection Listeriosis.

No reported cases of the illness associated with the milk have been reported.

The state Department of Agriculture and Markets said that consumers who purchased raw milk from the Foundation for Ag Integrity Churchtown Dairy should immediately dispose of it and call 518-851-2042.

The dairy’s cheese and other products are still approved for sale by state Agriculture and Markets.

Churchtown Dairy manages a 28-cow biodynamic raw milk dairy herd on 250 acres, according to its website.

The state Department of Agriculture and Markets is reminding consumers that raw milk does not provide the protection of pasteurization, a process that kills bacteria responsible for numerous illnesses and diseases.

Listeria:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as deli meat, cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeria infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The Delaware Division of Public Health (DPH) is reminding Delawareans to avoid consuming raw dairy products as it announces a confirmed case of brucellosis caused by Brucella melitensis in a 46-year-old Sussex County woman. The illness is a bacterial infection, which primarily affects those consuming, or coming into contact with, contaminated animals or animal products. The most common source of infection is through the consumption of raw, unpasteurized dairy products. Prior to becoming ill, the patient in this case had consumed unpasteurized homemade dairy products from Mexico. No other risk factors have been identified. The individual was hospitalized and is recovering after being treated for the illness. A second, related case of brucellosis is also pending confirmation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Brucellosis infection is most frequently transmitted by eating or drinking raw/unpasteurized dairy products such as milk and cheese, yet can also be contracted through inhalation or physical contact with infected animals or animal products. When sheep, goats, cows or camels are infected, their milk becomes contaminated with the bacteria. If the milk from infected animals is not pasteurized, the infection will be transmitted to people who consume the milk and/or cheese products. Brucellosis is not common in the United States. Nationally, the average is less than 200 human cases each year. Person to person transmission is rare. Prior to this case, DPH has confirmed three cases since 2010; those cases occurred in 2010, 2017 and 2018. The case in 2010 was associated with consumption of unpasteurized milk while the nature of exposure in the 2017 and 2018 cases is unknown.

“Cases such as this one can serve as an unfortunate reminder that we are vulnerable to certain bacteria and should take precautions to protect ourselves,” said DPH Medical Director Dr. Rick Hong. “Delawareans are encouraged to avoid purchasing and consuming unpasteurized dairy products. Consuming questionable food items is not worth the risk to your health.”

Raw milk and milk products are those that have not undergone a process called pasteurization that kills disease-causing germs. These types of products are common outside the United States and are increasingly being sold in mainstream supermarkets in the United States as well, though sales are not permitted in Delaware. A wide variety of germs that are sometimes found in raw milk can make people sick. These germs include Brucella, Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella.

The state’s Milk Safety Program, as well as statewide inspections of retail food establishments, are in place to protect consumers from purchasing or consuming raw dairy products, but unlawful distribution may still occur. Some neighboring states allow for the sale of raw dairy products, therefore residents should be aware of the health risks associated with consuming these products before purchasing and consuming them.

Signs and Symptoms of brucellosis are similar to the flu. Initial symptoms include fever, sweats, malaise, anorexia, headache, muscle or joint pain, and fatigue. Antibiotics are typically prescribed to treat brucellosis. In pregnant women, Brucella infections can be associated with miscarriage. Symptom onset can occur anywhere from five days to six months following exposure. Depending on the timing of treatment and the severity of illness, recovery may take several weeks.

No vaccine is available to prevent developing brucellosis, but preventive measures can be taken:

• Do not eat, drink, or purchase unpasteurized milk or dairy products, especially while traveling outside the U.S. Locations that commonly sell dairy products include supermarkets, farmers’ markets and dairy farms.

• Read the label on milk or milk products before you buy them. Many companies put the word “pasteurized” on the label. If you are not sure, ask a store employee if specific brands are pasteurized.

• At farm stands or farmers’ markets, ask if the milk and cream being sold have been pasteurized. If the market sells yogurt, ice cream, or cheese, ask if they were made with pasteurized milk.

• Meat packers, hunters and slaughterhouse employees should wear protective gloves and wash their hands thoroughly when handling raw meat.

According to press reports, Dungeness Valley Creamery is voluntarily pulling its milk products from store shelves again after a state Department of Agriculture sample found Escherichia coli bacteria, E. coli, in raw milk dated June 5.

Creamery co-owner Ryan McCarthey said Wednesday that they learned Tuesday about the sample and notified vendors to pull their raw milk, skim milk and cream with expiration dates of June 5-14.

State health officials urge customers not to drink or eat the product.

McCarthey said other state samples with expiration dates on June 2 and June 4 along with independent lab testing results of products expiring June 7, 10, 11 and 12 were found clear of E. coli.

The Creamery was previously given an all-clear in its samples April 22, after E. coli was found in two separate samples from late March and early April leading to an extended recall in April which owners said cost them tens-of-thousands of dollars.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets Tuesday warned consumers in Tioga County and the surrounding area not to consume unpasteurized raw goat milk from Side Hill Acres due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Side Hill Acres is located at 79 Spencer Road, Candor. To date, the Department has not received any reports of illnesses associated with this product.

A sample of the milk, collected by an inspector from the Department, was discovered to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. On May 31, the producer was notified of a preliminary positive test result. Further laboratory testing, completed on June 4 confirmed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in the raw milk sample. The producer is now prohibited from selling raw milk until subsequent sampling indicates that the product is free of harmful bacteria.

The Department recommends that any consumers who purchased raw goat milk from Side Hill Acres immediately dispose of it and call them at (607) 659-4121.

Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, which can be a serious and sometimes fatal infection in young children, cancer patients, elderly people and others with weakened immune systems. Although otherwise healthy persons may suffer only short-term, flu-like symptoms such as high fever, severe headaches, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeriosis can cause miscarriages and stillbirths in pregnant women.

It is important to note that raw milk does not provide the protection of pasteurization. Pasteurization is a process that heats milk to a specific temperature for a set period of time. Pasteurization kills the bacteria responsible for numerous illnesses and diseases such as listeriosis, salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, typhoid fever, tuberculosis, diphtheria and brucellosis. Pasteurization of milk is recognized internationally as an effective means of preventing outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, including listeriosis.

Listeria:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Listeria lawyers have litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as deli meat, cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.

If you or a family member became ill with a Listeria infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Listeria attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Sprout Creek Farm of Poughkeepsie, New York is recalling 4 wheels of “Kinkead” cheese made on 5-10-18, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

No illnesses have been reported to date. Any consumer with the product should dispose of it immediately. Sprout Creek Farm has been in contact with distributors and markets to immediately remove this batch of “Kinkead” cheese from their shelves.

The recalled batch of “Kinkead” cheese was distributed to the following locations, which have all been notified of the recall and instructed to dispose of the cheese:

Adams Fairacre Farms 160 OldPost Rd, Wappingers Falls, NY 12590
Rocking Horse Ranch 600 US-44, Highland, NY 12528
Mountain Brauhaus 3123 US-44, Gardiner, NY 12525
Online Order 2003 Avondale, Wichita Falls, TX 76308
The Amsterdam 6380 Mill Street Rhinebeck, NY 12572

“Kinkead” is a raw semi-firm, washed natural rind cheese, packaged with an orange label. Some of the distributed cheese was cut and sold by weight within the stores listed.

The issue was discovered as Sprout Creek Farm was taking proactive measures as part of determining the root cause of the Listeria monocytogenes contamination discovered during routine testing earlier this month. In conducting a thorough review, Sprout Creek Farm determined that Listeria monocytogenes may have been present in the environment. In line with Sprout Creek’s mission of providing healthy, sustainable food, all cheese in the farm’s aging caves is being tested to ensure its safety. No new cheese will be produced until a complete review and overhaul of creamery facilities, procedures, and standing practices are complete.

Sprout Creek Farm voluntarily ceased all production of cheese immediately following that recall initiated on November 6.  Additionally since the November 6 recall, there has been no production or distribution of any cheese by the farm. The 5-10-2018 “Kinkead” cheese was distributed prior to the November 6 recall.

People who purchased raw whole milk from Pot ‘O Gold Dairy Specialties in Bear Lake, Warren County are asked to throw it out after it was linked to cases of salmonella, the Pennsylvania Department of Health announced Friday.

Milk was sold from Sept. 10 to present in glass, half-gallon containers with the Pot O’ Gold label at 16 stores in Crawford, Erie, McKean, Venango and Warren counties.

Nine cases of salmonella have been reported. It causes diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps and vomiting. While most recover in four to seven days, salmonella can be more serious in older adults, infants and those with chronic illnesses. Anyone who consumed the milk and became ill should consult their physicians.

The milk was sold at these locations:

Crawford County

  • Buck and Kathy, Titusville
  • D&J Bakery, Cambridge Springs
  • Miller’s Country Store, Cochranton

Erie County

  • Corry Lumber, Corry
  • Duran’s Farm Fresh Products, Waterford
  • Edinboro Market, Edinboro
  • Orton’s Fruit Market, North East
  • Sander’s Market, Corry

McKean County

  • Circle K Feeds, Kane

Venango County

  • Farmer’s Daughter’s Country Market

Warren County

  • Kondak’s Market, Clarendon
  • Lottsville Milling, Lottsville
  • Scandia General Store, Scandia
  • Shell Service Center, Warren
  • Town and Country Store, Sugar Grove
  • Youngsville Hardware, Youngsville

A message from the farm:

This is an important message to ALL RAW MILK CUSTOMERS.
It has come to our attention that there could be a possible health concern with our RAW MILK. Because we want to be pro-active during the testing process, we are voluntarily stopping the sales of the RAW milk until results have been obtained.
We assure you that this has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with the pasteurized milk. It is available for sale, as always.
This is only concerning the RAW milk.
We greatly apologize for any inconvenience this has caused. We will keep you all updated as soon as we are informed.
Thank you all for being so faithful to our farm.
We love you all.

 

Prior E. coli outbreak in 2009 and recall in 2013.

The Washington Department of Health reports a young child from Island County and an elderly Clallam County resident became ill with an E. coli infection after drinking raw milk from Sequim’s Dungeness Valley Creamery.

The Department of Health cautioned consumers today to be aware of the risks of drinking raw milk especially for infants and young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems.

“Raw milk doesn’t go through the pasteurization process where harmful germs and bacteria are destroyed. This puts infants, young children, the elderly, pregnant women and those with a weakened immune system at a greater risk of illness when they drink it,” said Dr. Scott Lindquist, Washington state communicable disease epidemiologist.

Lab results recently confirmed a child under 5 years old from Island County and resident in their 70s of Clallam County became ill with an E. coli infection after drinking Dungeness Valley Creamery raw milk.

E. coli infections may cause severe diarrhea, stomach cramps and bloody stool. Symptoms generally appear three to four days after exposure, but can take up to nine days to appear. In some cases, the infection causes a serious disease resulting in kidney failure.

Individuals who have any of these symptoms after consuming raw milk should consult their health care provider and notify their local health departments.

In 2009 an outbreak was linked to the consumption of raw, unpasteurized, whole milk produced by the Dungeness Valley Creamery. There were a total of three cases. There were two E. coli strains implicated. One strain was confirmed and was E. coli O121. The other strain was suspected and was E. coli O157:H7. Raw milk was legal to sell and buy in Washington, provided the dairy underwent a series of inspections and was licensed. This dairy had been licensed since 2006.

In 2013, the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) is warned consumers not to drink Dungeness Valley Creamery brand raw Jersey whole milk, raw Jersey skim milk, and raw Jersey cream because the products may be contaminated with Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli) that can cause serious illness.

Dungeness Valley Creamery raw Jersey cream, raw Jersey whole milk and raw Jersey skim milk with any Best Buy dates of 03/02 or later may be contaminated. The firm sells its products in gallon, half gallon, quart and pint containers. Today’s health alert includes all container sizes of the unpasteurized milk products.

The health alert is being initiated after routine sampling by WSDA found toxin-producing E. coli in a sample of raw cream. Based in Sequim, the Dungeness Valley Creamery and WSDA are continuing their investigation into the source of the problem. Currently, no human illnesses have been linked with these products.

Some strains of E. coli produce a toxin called Shiga toxin that can lead to severe illness. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections may cause severe diarrhea, stomach cramps, and bloody stool. Symptoms generally appear three to four days after exposure, but can take as long as nine days to appear. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should contact a health care provider.

The infection sometimes causes hemolytic uremic syndrome, a serious disease in which red blood cells are destroyed and the kidneys fail. Infants, children, pregnant women, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems are especially at risk.

According to the Dungeness Valley Creamery website, the firm’s products are sold at the following retail locations:
• Bainbridge Island: Real Foods; Pan D’Amore; Walt’s Lynwood Center Market
• Bothell: Tru Health
• Bremerton: CJ’s Evergreen General Store; Fresh Local
• Federal Way: Marlene’s Market & Deli
• Issaquah: Front Street Red Apple
• Longview: Country village Nutrition Shoppe
• Olympia: Olympia Food Co-op East; Olympia Food Co-op West
• Port Angeles: Country Aire; Good To Go
• Port Townsend: Port Townsend Food Co-op
• Poulsbo: Abundantly Green
• Seattle: Madison Market; My Asia’s Essentials; Pike Place Market Creamery
• Sequim: Sequim Prairie Grange; Red Rooster Grocery; Sunny Farms Farm Store
• Tacoma: Marlene’s Market & Deli
• Vancouver: Chuck’s Produce; Neighbors Market

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne KinerStephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is working with Mondelēz International, Inc., Pepperidge Farm Inc. and Flowers Foods, Inc. to initiate voluntarily recalls of certain products due to a potential risk that one of the ingredients may have been contaminated with Salmonella. Recalled foods include a variety of Mondelēz’s Ritz cheese sandwiches and Ritz Bits cheese products, certain Pepperidge Farm’s Goldfish, and Flowers Foods’ Swiss Rolls sold under various brand names. Additional information about each specific recall is available on our website. We recommend people discard or return any recalled product to the store where it was purchased.

There is no evidence at this time that anyone was sickened from one of these products, or that these products are contaminated. These recalls are being initiated because of a potential risk, and out of an abundance of caution. We are investigating this potential risk and closely monitoring whether there are any reported cases of food related illness associated with any of these products.

We believe these products may contain a common whey ingredient supplied by Associated Milk Producers Inc., that may have been contaminated with Salmonella. As there are likely other food products made by other manufacturers that also use this common ingredient, there may be other recalls initiated in the coming days. We are also aware that our partners at the U.S. Department of Agriculture are working with Pinnacle Foods Inc. on a public health alert regarding certain Hungry Man products that may also contain this ingredient.

KNOXVILLE, Tennessee – Marler Clark has been retained by several families of children sickened by E. coli O157:H7 in Tennessee since mid-May.  One cluster of multiple illnesses is linked to the consumption of raw milk from French Broad Farm in Mascot, Tennessee; and another cluster appears to be linked to a Mascot day care center, Kids Place Inc.  To date, East Tennessee Children’s Hospital has treated 12 children sickened since mid-May.

Marler Clark attorney Drew Falkenstien traveled to Knoxville to meet with multiple families last week. “It’s a tragic situation.  It appears to be an extremely virulent strain of E. coli O157:H7, causing some kids to be critically ill.  We’re waiting for additional information from the health department’s investigation, and meanwhile just hoping for all the kids to progress medically.”

Raw milk is extremely dangerous and has been tied to many E. coli O157 outbreaks in the past. Although it is rare for healthy adults to develop life-threatening illness from E.coli, children, elderly, and the immune compromised are vulnerable.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner,Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The Knox County Health Department (KCHD) is investigating a cluster of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 cases in children likely associated with consumption of raw milk and contact with farm animals.

Most of the children are known to have consumed raw milk from a local cow-share dairy. Due to possible contamination with E. coli O157 and out of an abundance of caution, KCHD advises the public not to consume raw milk or any other unpasteurized products from French Broad Farm in Mascot, Tenn. at this time. Officials also recommend consumers dispose of all raw milk and unpasteurized products they may have from this farm.

Any further exposure to the farm animals in question has been mitigated as the facility is not currently operating. Therefore, no further directive on that potential source is necessary.

“Bacteria, like E. coli, cannot be seen with the naked eye,” said KCHD Director Dr. Martha Buchanan. “For some perspective, roughly 1,800 can fit on the head of a pen, and it only takes about 10 to make you sick.”

Raw milk and other unpasteurized products can contain harmful bacteria, including E. coli O157. While it is possible to get sick from many other foods, raw milk is one of the riskiest. E. coli can also be found in the feces of cattle, goats, sheep and other ruminant animals. Historically, the major source for human illness is cattle, which can carry E. coli 0157 and show no signs of illness. These bacteria, however, can cause severe diarrhea and even life-threatening complications for humans, especially children, older adults, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems. Information on preventing E. coli can be found on the CDC’s website.

Symptoms of E. coli infection vary for each person, but often include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some may have a low fever (less than 101 ̊F). Some infections are mild, but others can be severe.

Seek medical attention immediately if you or your child has watery, bloody diarrhea that does not resolve quickly. Tell your provider if you or your child have consumed raw milk or had contact with farm animals. For general questions about E. coli, you may call 865-215-5555 between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner,Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.