The CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections. This outbreak includes four different types of Salmonella: Kiambu, Thompson, Agona, and Gaminara. The same strain of these types of Salmonella were found in samples collected from papayas and from ill people.

A total of 173 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51), Salmonella Thompson (111), Salmonella Agona (7), or Salmonella Gaminara (4) have been reported from 21 states.  Connecticut 6, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 3, Kentucky 4, Louisiana 1, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 8, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, Missouri 1, North Carolina 5, New Jersey 36, New York 50, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Tennessee 1, Texas 9, Virginia 16, Wisconsin 1.  Fifty-eight ill people have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak. Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately. The FDA has also added the Carica de Campeche farm to Import Alert (IA) 99-35, after testing found multiple strains of Salmonella present in the fruit. Thus far, Salmonella strains matching the outbreak patterns by PFGE were only isolated from papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS), along with several other health agencies, are investigating at least seven cases of salmonella affecting people in four Wisconsin counties after all of them consumed fresh shelled peas purchased at farmers markets.

The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) and four Local Health Departments are investigating the cases.

According to DHS, the investigation shows at least seven people infected with the same strain of salmonella reported eating fresh shelled (loose) peas purchased from farmers markets in Green Bay, Madison, and Fond du Lac on Saturday July 22nd. Shelled peas are loose, no longer in their pod.

The investigation into the source of the suspected peas is ongoing.

Anyone who purchased already shelled (loose) peas during July 19th – August 5th from the three farmers markets is advised to dispose of any remaining peas, even if the peas have been frozen.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Food safety attorney Bill Marler advocates for stricter regulations on imports coming into U.S.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is reporting that, as of August 9, 141 people have been infected with strains of Salmonella traced back to papayas imported from Mexico.

Nineteen states have confirmed cases, including Connecticut (5), Delaware (4), Iowa (2), Kentucky (3), Louisiana (2), Maryland (8), Massachusetts (6), Michigan (1), Minnesota (4), North Carolina (3), New Jersey (27), New York (39), Ohio (1), Oklahoma (4), Pennsylvania (8), Texas (7), Virginia (14), and Wisconsin (1). Victims range in age from 1 year to 95 with a median age of 39. One death—a victim from New York—has been attributed to this outbreak.

Despite the heavy toll already caused by this outbreak, it’s possible new cases may come to light. Based on the information collected to date, the CDC is recommending consumers not eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico. When in doubt about the origins of a papaya, the CDC is cautioning consumers and restaurants to throw it out.

According to Bill Marler, food safety advocate and attorney, this latest outbreak is just the latest in what is proving to be an increasingly disturbing trend. In an Op-Ed for The Hill, Marler writes how the U.S. relys on imports for “some of our most nutritionally important but more risky commodities” and how imported foods are making up a bigger and bigger part of the average American’s diet. In 2014, the U.S. imported nearly $50 billion in food from just four countries—Mexico, Canada, China, and India. This practice has come at a price—recent largescale foodborne illnesses have been traced back to scallops, strawberries, and other whole foods imported into the U.S.

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA)—a bi-partisan piece of legislation passed during the Obama administration—was supposed to increase scrutiny of imported foods, but, unfortunately, Congress has not adequately funded this portion of the program. And the problem isn’t going to go away: President Trump’s proposed 2018 budget actually cuts $83 million from the FDA’s food safety programs. Illnesses tied to foodborne illness in the U.S. cost an estimated $55 billion a year.

“As a lawyer who has represented thousands of victims of foodborne illnesses over the last 25 years, I have seen the devastation that can be caused by pathogens like E. coli, Salmonella, and Listeria. I have been to funerals and watched children struggle in ICUs,” writes Marler.

“Spending money on food safety is smart, and spending money making sure that the imported foods we consume are not tainted with a pathogen that can kill your child or ruin our farmers is even smarter.”

ABOUT BILL MARLER

Bill Marler is an accomplished food safety advocate and attorney. He began litigating foodborne illness cases in 1993, when he successfully represented Brianne Kiner, the most seriously injured survivor of the Jack in the Box E. coli O157:H7 outbreak. Over the years, Bill and his firm, Marler Clark, have become the leaders in representing victims of foodborne illness, and have gone against companies that include Odwalla, Chili’s, ConAgra, Dole, KFC, Sizzler, Golden Corral and Wendy’s.

Bill spends much of his time traveling to address food industry groups, fair associations, and public health groups about foodborne illness, related litigation, and surrounding issues. He has testified before Congress as well as State Legislatures. He is a frequent author of articles related to foodborne illness in food safety journals and magazines as well as on his personal blog, www.marlerblog.com. Bill also recently founded Food Safety News (www.foodsafetynews.com) as a one-stop resource for global food safety news and information.

As of August 9, 2017, 141 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (51) or Salmonella Thompson (90) have been reported from 19 states. Connecticut 5, Delaware 4, Iowa 2, Illinois 2, Kentucky 3, Louisiana 2, Maryland 8, Massachusetts 6, Michigan 1, Minnesota 4, North Carolina 3, New Jersey 27, New York 39, Ohio 1, Oklahoma 4, Pennsylvania 8, Texas 7, Virginia 14, Wisconsin 1, Total 141

Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 17, 2017 to July 27, 2017. Ill people range in age from less than 1 year to 95, with a median age of 39. Among 136 ill people with available information, 83 (61%) are female. Among 98 people with available information, 66 (67%) are of Hispanic ethnicity. Among 103 people with available information, 45 (44%) have been hospitalized. One death was reported from New York City.

Illnesses that occurred after July 14, 2017, might not be reported yet due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

Based on information collected to date, CDC is now recommending that consumers not eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico. If consumers aren’t sure if their Maradol papaya came from the Carica de Campeche farm, they should ask the place of purchase. When in doubt, don’t eat it; just throw it out. Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm.

As was reported in the last update on August 4, FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and isolated several types of Salmonella bacteria, including Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Kiambu, Salmonella Gaminara, Salmonella Thompson, and Salmonella Senftenberg. CDC is working to determine if there are any illnesses with these other types of Salmonella linked to this outbreak.

The FDA is advising consumers not to eat Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche farm in Mexico because they are linked to an outbreak of salmonellosis.

Three brands of Maradol papayas have been recalled: Caribeña brand, distributed by Grande Produce; certain Cavi brand papayas distributed by Agroson’s; and Valery brand papayas, distributed by Freshtex Produce, LLC. If anyone has these papayas in their home, they should dispose of them immediately.

Freshtex Produce of Alamo, TX is voluntarily recalling “Valery” brand Maradol Papayas grown and packed by Carica de Campeche, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The Maradol Papayas was distributed to the State of Illinois from July 10 to July 13, 2017. However, the product may have been further distributed outside the state of Illinois.

Consumers can identify the Fresh papayas by the “Valery” name on the box and label grown and packed by Carica de Campeche.

No other papayas distributed by Freshtex Produce LLC are subject to the recall.

The recall was initiated after Freshtex Produce’s LLC, was notified by the FDA, on August 4, 2017, that other brands of Maradol Papayas from the farm, Carica de Campeche, had tested positive for Salmonella. As of today no illnesses have been reported from the Valery brand of Maradol Papayas but as a precaution the FDA recommended a recall of all Maradol Papayas imported in the month July from the Carica de Campeche farm.

Freshtex Produce LLC has ceased importing papayas from the grower, Carica de Campeche, and is taking all precautionary measures to ensure the safety of its imported produce.

A total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (48) or Salmonella Thompson (61) have been reported from 16 states – Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Thirty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

At this time, Caribeña brand papayas from Mexico have been identified as one brand linked to the outbreak. On July 26, Grande Produce recalled Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017.

Through testing, the FDA has also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak. The agency is working to identify other brands of papayas that may have originated from Carica de Campeche and facilitate recalls.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Agroson’s LLC of Bronx, NY is recalling 2,483 boxes of Maradol Papaya Cavi Brand, grown and packed by Carica de Campeche, as a precaution because other brands that also buy from this farm have been tested positive for Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonellaoften experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

Product was distributed to wholesalers in the following states NY, CT, and NJ, from July 16 to 19, 2017. This product was further to downstream customers, including retail consumers. The papayas were available for sale until July 31, 2017. Consumers can identify the papayas by PLU sticker, cavi MEXICO 4395.

Wholesalers can identify the product by codes found above the handle on the master carton, codes include: 3044, 3045 and 3050. The farm that grew the papayas is also listed on the upper left side of the master carton, CARICA DE CAMPHE.

No other papayas distributed by Agroson’s LLC are subject to the recall.

All wholesale customers to whom the papayas were delivered have already been notified to remove the recalled papayas from inventory, store shelves, and other commercial venues. Recall effectiveness checks are already underway by Agroson’s LLC.

The recall was initiated after Agroson’s LLC, was notified by the FDA, on August 2, 2017, that several brands of Maradol Papaya from the farm, Carica de Campeche, had tested positive for Salmonella. None of the brands were specifically Cavi Brand, but as a precaution FDA recommended a recall of all papayas imported in the month of July from this farm.

Agroson’s LLC has ceased importing papayas from the grower, Carica de Campeche. The company is taking precautionary measures to ensure the safety of its imported produce by taking samples of every load to a private lab, and testing forSalmonella. The company is also cooperating with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in their investigation and will provide any assistance possible.

Elkhorn Logan Valley Public Health Department, along with Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, is continuing to investigate an outbreak of salmonella in West Point. Gina Uhing, Health Director for Elkhorn Logan Valley Public Health Department reports that: “to date, there have been 22 confirmed cases and 6 probable cases.”

“All of the interviews that have been conducted with confirmed cases continue to show that dining at Red Door Coffee was a common factor,” Uhing said. “For that reason, a survey of restaurant patrons was initiated to help determine possible causes and sources of the illness.” Red Door Coffee owners and staff have been extremely cooperative and helpful throughout this process and all parties are focused on resolving this issue.

Anyone who ate at Red Door Coffee between July 14 – July 29 is asked to complete a brief survey that will help ELVPHD and DHHS in this process. The survey may be found
at: https://han.ne.gov/survey/rdc or by visiting the ELVPHD website at www.elvphd.org.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The CDC reports today that the outbreak investigation has expanded to include another strain of Salmonella.

Sixty-four more ill people from 15 states were added to this investigation since the last update on July 21, 2017.

Six more states have reported ill people: Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Laboratory tests showed that the strain of Salmonella Thompson isolated from papayas collected in Maryland is closely related genetically to clinical isolates from ill people.

FDA tested other papayas imported from Mexico and found they were contaminated with several types of Salmonella.

A total of 109 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Kiambu (48) or Salmonella Thompson (61) have been reported from 16 states – Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Connecticut, Delaware, Michigan, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin

Thirty-five ill people have been hospitalized. One death has been reported from New York City.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Maradol papayas imported from Mexico are the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

At this time, Caribeña brand papayas from Mexico have been identified as one brand linked to the outbreak. On July 26, Grande Produce recalled Caribeña brand Maradol papayas that were distributed between July 10 and July 19, 2017.

Through testing, the FDA has also identified Maradol papayas from the Carica de Campeche papaya farm in Mexico as a likely source of the outbreak. The agency is working to identify other brands of papayas that may have originated from Carica de Campeche and facilitate recalls.

CDC recommends that consumers not eat, restaurants not serve, and retailers not sell Maradol papayas from Mexico.

Elkhorn Logan Valley Public Health Department and Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services continue to investigate an outbreak of salmonella in West Point. To date, there have been 20 confirmed cases and 8 probable cases. ELVPHD and DHHS are working to identify the source of the outbreak and make sure the risk is eliminated.

Local health department officials and DHHS are conducting interviews with Nebraskans who contracted the illness. So far, all confirmed cases have one common factor which is dining at Red Door Coffee in West Point. Red Door Coffee owners and staff are fully cooperating with the investigation.

Anyone who ate at Red Door Coffee July 14 – July 29 is asked to complete a brief survey that will help ELVPHD and DHHS in this investigation. The survey may be found at:  https://han.ne.gov/survey/rdc.

Salmonella is caused by a bacteria that lives in the intestinal tracts of humans and animals. It is usually spread to humans by eating contaminated food, including beef, poultry, milk, eggs, fruits or vegetables.

Symptoms of salmonella include fever, diarrhea and stomach cramps. The illness usually lasts 4-7 days. Most people recover without treatment. However, in some cases the diarrhea may be so severe that a person needs to be hospitalized. People at highest risk for salmonella infection include: children under 5 years old, older adults and people with weakened immune systems. Anyone experiencing symptoms consistent with salmonella should contact their doctor for recommendations on testing and treatment.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.