Salmonella Lawyer. Salmonella Attorney

The Alabama Department of Public Health has determined that the Salmonella outbreak last week in Colbert County that reportedly sickened at least 99 patients and hospitalized 22 is most likely linked to a meal prepared for a private event. Eighteen of the hospitalized persons have been discharged home and the remaining hospitalized patients are recovering. Approximately 150 persons attended the private event.

The investigation is ongoing, but preliminary reports indicate the state health department laboratory has identified Salmonella enteriditis (a common foodborne germ) in food specimens of cooked chicken as well as green beans.

Dr. Karen Landers, Assistant State Health Officer, Bureau of Communicable Disease, states that chicken was likely the primary source of the germ as raw chicken can be contaminated with Salmonella. Chicken has to be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit to kill the germ. Finding Salmonella in the green beans during this investigation was probably from cross contamination such as using the same serving utensils for the beans and the chicken.

Dr. Scott Harris, Assistant State Health Officer for Public Health Area 2, where the catering business was located, states that he issued an emergency order to suspend the caterer’s permit last week pending further investigation. The caterer, Indelible Catering of Moulton, is no longer preparing food for the public.

Salmonella outbreaks reported by the CDC in 2016 were linked to contaminated eggs, poultry, meat, unpasteurized milk and juice, cheese, contaminated raw fruits and vegetables (alfalfa sprouts, melons), spices and nuts.

Food safety practices can reduce the risk of foodborne outbreaks. Some measures to reduce illness include keeping food properly refrigerated before cooking, washing hands with soap and warm water before handling foods, and cleaning surfaces before preparing foods on them.

Follow these practices when preparing foods:

  • Separate cooked foods from ready-to-eat foods.
  • Do not use utensils on cooked foods that were previously used on raw foods and do not place cooked foods on plates where raw foods once were unless the plates have been cleaned thoroughly.
  • Cook foods to a safe internal temperature. Use a meat thermometer to make sure foods are cooked to a safe temperature.
  • Chill foods promptly after serving and when transporting from one place to another. Safe temperatures for food preparation are available on many websites including foodsafety.gov.

Salmonella:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Asher’s Chocolates/Lewistown, Inc., an affiliated partner of Chester A. Asher Inc. (“Asher’s”) is initiating a voluntary recall of multiple chocolates, chocolate bars, cellophane wrapped chocolates, and individually wrapped chocolates, etc. under the Asher’s brand due to possible Salmonella contamination of items produced in their Lewistown, PA facility distributed nationwide.

Asher’s Brand Products under this voluntary recall are:

Product UPC Label Description Lot# Size
11516 Milk Chocolate Pretzel Pieces 8 oz. 000334469 8 oz.
11517 Dark Chocolate Pretzel Pieces 8 oz. 000334470 8 oz.
14765 Milk Chocolate Vanilla Caramel with Sea Salt 4 oz. 000337556 4 oz.
47350 Dark Chocolate Hostess Mint 6 oz. 000335615 6oz.
55115 KEYSTONE CRUNCH 4 OZ BAG 000336374, 000337658 4 oz.
55165 KEYSTONE CRUNCH 6 oz. 000335591 6 oz.
55180 Milk Chocolate Coated Boardwalk Crunch 4 oz. 000335625 4 oz.
55185 KEYSTONE CRUNCH 1 LB 000336375 16 oz.
63385 Milk Chocolate with Fall String 4 oz. 000335852 4 oz.
63386 Dark Chocolate mini Pretzels Fall String 4 oz. 000335848 4 oz.
65902 Dark Chocolate Molasses Pop 4 oz. 000336201, 000335800 4 oz.
65902 Dark Chocolate Molasses Pop 2 oz. 000336376 2 oz.
67395 Milk Chocolate Peanut Butter Heaven 3 oz. 000337016, 000337663 3 oz.
75005 Milk Chocolate Nonpareil Pop 1.25 oz. 000335701, 000336520 1.25 oz.
75027 Milk Chocolate Crisped Rice Pop with Fall Leaves 3 oz. 000337574, 000337673 3 oz.
75030 Milk Chocolate Crisped Rice Pop with Christmas Seeds 3 oz. 000336521 3 oz.
75037 Milk Chocolate Crisped Rice Pop Multi Seeds 2.25 oz. 000335803, 000337173 2.25 oz.
75085 Milk Chocolate Non Peril with Fall Seed 4 oz. 000335963 4 oz.
75086 Dark Chocolate Non Pareils with Fall Seed 4 oz. 000335858 4 oz.
75087 White Confectionery Coating Non pareils with orange and yellow seed 4 oz. 000337178 4 oz.
75107 White Confectionery Coating Peanut Butter Cup 2.35 oz. 000336377, 000337560, 000337665 2.35 oz.
75141 Milk Chocolate POTATO CHIP 4 oz. 000335918 4 oz.
75151 Milk Chocolate Coated Mini Pretzels 4 oz. 000335843, 000336481 4 oz.
75152 Dark Chocolate Coated Mini Pretzels 4 oz. 000335590, 000336482 4 oz.
75153 White Confectionery Coated Mini Pretzels 4 oz. 000335589 4 oz.
75245 Milk Chocolate Pretzel Rod 3pcs Asst. with Asher Bow 3.5 oz. 000335802, 000335910, 000336608, 000337177 3.5 oz.
75260 Milk Pretzel Rod 3 piece assorted 3.5 oz. 000335699, 000337664 3.5 oz.
75261 Milk Chocolate Pretzel Cluster 4 oz. 000335930, 000336198, 000336378, 000336879, 000337013 4 oz.
75277 Milk Chocolate Coated Potato Chip Coffee Bag 8.5 oz. 000336044 8.5 oz,
75279 Milk Boardwalk Crunch Coffee Bag 6 oz. 000335043 6 oz.
75282 Dark Chocolate costed POTATO CHIP COFFEE BAG 8.5 oz. 000335851 8.5 oz.
76025 Milk Chocolate Crisped Rice Pop Multi Seeds 3 oz. 000335722, 000337573, 000335462 3 oz.
82379 Milk SF Almond Butter Toffee 3 oz. 000335955 3 oz.
82421 Milk Chocolate Fruit Center Bar 3.5 oz. 000335414 3.5 oz.
83851 Dark Chocolate Almond Bark (Scored) 4 oz. 000335647, 000335856 4 oz.
83855 Milk Chocolate Non Pareils with multi seed 4 oz. 000335854 4 oz.
83856 Dark Chocolate Non Pareils with White Seed 4 oz. 000335855 4 oz.
83858 Milk Chocolate Mini Pretzels 4 oz. 000335588 4 oz.
83859 Dark Chocolate Mini Pretzel Ash Label 4 oz. 000335862 4 oz.
83860 White Confectionery Coated Mini Pretzels 4 oz. 000335969, 000337245 4 oz.
87145 Milk and Dark Chocolate Fall Pretzel Pre Pack 3 per case 000336450 4 oz.

ucm519186The recalled items can be identified by the production code printed on the side of the label. No other production codes are affected by this recall.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem. No products manufactured by C.A. Asher Inc./Asher’s Chocolate Co. of Souderton PA are involved in this recall.

The recalled candy products were distributed nationwide in retail stores.

The potential for contamination was noted after a single sample from routine testing by the company revealed the presence of Salmonella in a group of products.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

Screen Shot 2016-02-01 at 3.14.24 PMBraga Organic Farms announces the voluntary recall of pistachios due to potential contamination with Salmonella, an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella can experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this recall.

The recalled nuts were distributed in retail stores in California, Oregon and Washington, and it was distributed through online sales nationwide.

The product comes in a clear or green standup bag, with the date code stamped on the bottom of the bag.

The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by the FDA revealed the presence of Salmonella in a one-pound package of raw pistachio kernels purchased online.

A list of affected products and code dates is listed below; no other Braga Organic Farms products are associated with this voluntary recall.

Product Size UPC BEST BY OR PURCHASE DATE
Raw Pistachio Kernels 8 oz 896547002047 JUN 29 2016, JUL 04 2016, JUL 18 2016, JUL 25 2016, JUL 26 2016
1 lb 810126020215 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/27/16
2 lbs 896547002306 JUN 28 2016, JUL 13 2016, JUL 27 2016
5 lbs 896547002641 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/27/16
Trail Mix 8 oz 896547002139 JUN 29 2016, JUL 7 2016, JUL 11 2016, JUL 26 2016
1 lb 810126020451 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/29/16
2 lbs 896547002320 JUL 01 2016, Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/29/16
5 lbs 896547002603 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/29/16
25 lbs 896547002492 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/29/16
Nut Mix 8 oz 896547002177 JUL 06 2016, JUL 07 2016, JUL 11 2016, JUL 18 2016
1 lb 810126020192 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/27/16
2 lbs 896547002351 JUL 01 2016, Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/27/16
5 lbs 810126020208 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/27/16
25 lbs 896547002412 Purchased 12/28/15 to 1/27/16

Consumers who have purchased this recalled product should not consume it.

Snohomish man files lawsuit after falling severely ill from Salmonella poisoning; more illnesses possible with clusters around Asian restaurants

Snohomish County resident, Nicholas Guzley, will file a lawsuit Monday against Kapowsin Meat, Inc., a slaughterhouse located in Graham, Washington. The plaintiff, who is suing for damages from Salmonella poisoning, is being represented by food safety advocate, William D. Marler, managing attorney at Marler Clark LLP, PS, based in Seattle, Washington.  This is the second case Marler Clark has filed in relation to this particular Salmonella outbreak.

On or about July 19, 2015, Mr. Guzley consumed a pork dish prepared and sold by a Seattle-based Asian restaurant. The pork used in the dish, which was contaminated with strains of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i, was traced back to Kapowsin Meat.

The following morning, Mr. Guzley suffered painful abdominal cramps and other severe symptoms. That evening, Mr. Guzley admitted himself to the emergency room at Providence Hospital where he was treated for dehydration.

Over the next several days, Mr. Guzley’s condition did not improve, and required further treatment at the Everett Clinic on July 22. On July 23, he developed bloody diarrhea and required ambulance transport to Providence Hospital’s emergency room.

On July 23, Mr. Guzley’s submitted a stool sample that ultimately tested positive for Salmonella I 4,5,12:i:-, which is the same multi-drug resistant strain involved in the outbreak linked by Washington state and federal health officials to Kapowsin pork products.

Mr. Guzley remained acutely ill for two weeks, incurring substantial economic losses due to missed work and medical expenses. Additionally, he has been under the care of a gastroenterologist who has diagnosed him with post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome.

Kapowsin Meat has recalled approximately 116,262 pounds of whole hogs that may be contaminated with Salmonella that were produced between April 18, 2015 and July 27, 2015. So far, 134 victims of Salmonella poisoning have been reported between the ages of 1 and 90. Among the 111 victims with available information, 14% have been hospitalized for their illnesses. Luckily no deaths have yet been reported.

“Federal regulations are intended to keep the public safe,” said Marler, food safety activist and foodborne illness expert. “Without the listing of Salmonella as an adulterant, especially the antibiotic resistant strains, the safety of consumers is compromised. Its exclusion is exceedingly irresponsible, and entirely unacceptable.”

While this is only the second lawsuit filed by Marler Clark in regards to Kapowsin Meat’s Salmonella outbreak, the number of victims is expected to increase with the very real possibility of outbreaks centered around Asian restaurants and other related eateries.

USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has posted a distribution list of 60 retail and distribution outlets in Washington State, Alaska, and Oregon, which received whole hogs from Kapowsin Meat. Unfortunately, the list does not account for the distribution records relating to various other pork products that may also harbor the bacteria.

The vast majority of whole hog distribution locations are within Washington State, and many of those are located in and around Seattle. Two locations are listed in Seattle’s Uwajimaya International District, and have likely infiltrated dozens of Asian restaurants in the area. Because many of the distribution outlets are meat distributors themselves, the Salmonella outbreak is even more widespread than initially anticipated.

To date, there are upwards of 80 Salmonella cases in King County alone. Marler suspects that more illnesses clustered around Asian restaurants or Uwajimaya will arise. He is also concerned about what other pork products—other than whole hogs—produced by Kapowsin might be contaminated. “Without entire documentation of Kapowsin’s pork distribution, it may prove difficult to halt the outbreak before more people fall ill,” said Marler. “Despite issuing a recall of whole hogs, Kapowsin may also be responsible for the contamination of other pork products that we are not yet aware of and that’s a scary proposition.”

Salmonella is the second most common foodborne illness in the United States. Approximately 1.4 million cases of Salmonella occur each year with 95% of those caused by tainted food. The acute symptoms of Salmonella include the sudden onset of nausea, abdominal cramping, and bloody diarrhea and mucous over a period of days. While there is no cure, infected persons usually recover completely, although it may take months. A small number of people experience ongoing symptoms such as joint pain, which can lead to chronic arthritis.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Marler Clark attorneys have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.

Marler has recently been featured on PBS’s Frontline (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/trouble-with-chicken/) revealing the problems associated with omitting Salmonella as an adulterant. Marler was also featured this year in The New Yorker to discuss issues relating to Salmonella in the meat packing industry (http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/02/02/bug-system).

Below is a very interesting perspective on “food crimes.”  We need to have a broad discussion on how regulation, civil and criminal litigation can make our food supplier safer.  With respect to whether a food executive would not recall a product because it could put him or her in jail – I think the opposite is true.  Although, most recalls are “voluntary” – they are not really – once a product is found to be adulterated, there really is nothing voluntary about recalling the product.  I submit the executive would be in far greater hot water if the product was not recalled and it caused harm.

In Peanut Food Poisoning Case, Punishment Doesn’t Fit the Crime
Jenna Greene, The Litigation Daily
July 26, 2015

business-man-in-handcuffs-300x205It’s hard to feel sorry for Stewart Parnell.

The former owner and CEO of Peanut Corporation of America and his brother Michael, a peanut broker, were convicted last year of multiple counts of conspiracy and fraud for selling peanut-based products tainted with salmonella.

Thousands of people in 46 states were sickened-the kind of sick where, as one plaintiff described it, her bowel movements were pure blood. Nine people died.

According to federal prosecutors, the Parnells “knew that salmonella could cause great harm, knew that their products tested positive for salmonella, and knew that they were selling those products anyway, all the while lying to their customers about the safety of those products.”

The question is, what’s the appropriate punishment?

In a July 22 court filing, Justice Department lawyers said that based on federal sentencing guidelines, Stewart Parnell should get life in prison, Michael Parnell should serve 17.5 to 21.8 years and Mary Wilkerson, the quality assurance manager at the company’s peanut processing plant in Blakely, Ga., should get 8 to 10 years.

Such lengthy sentences are without precedent for food safety violations, which are rarely subject to criminal prosecution. But perversely, the punishment may have a detrimental effect on food safety. That’s because the length of the sentence is tied to the amount of money lost in the fraud-in this case, a recall covering 3,918 peanut products. It resulted in $144 million in direct losses and more than $1 billion in lost sales.

For example, the company was one of three peanut paste suppliers for Kellogg Co., for use in products like Keebler peanut butter sandwich crackers and Famous Amos peanut butter cookies. Peanut Corp. falsely told Kellogg that its paste had been microbiologically tested and determined to be safe.

Kellogg then inter-mingled the peanut paste from all of its suppliers, according to E. Scott Austin, a partner at Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore who represents Stewart Parnell, ballooning the size of the recall. Austin argues that sentencing guideline calculations don’t fit a case like this. “When you have hundreds of millions of dollars lost through a food recall, that makes any food recall potentially a life sentence in prison,” he said.

The result: food executives will be afraid to issue broad-based voluntary recalls-and virtually all recalls are voluntary-if it means they could spend the rest of their lives in jail. It’s an outcome that doesn’t seem likely to lead to safer food, even if it sends an unequivocal message that food safety matters.

Sentencing is set for Sept. 21 before U.S. District Judge W. Louis Sands in the Middle District of Georgia.

The case also underscores how idiosyncratic criminal prosecutions are for food safety violations. That there are civil consequences for food poisoning is all but certain-plaintiffs lawyers like William Marler of Marler Clark in Seattle see to that.

Indeed, Marler filed 41 lawsuits against Peanut Corp. on behalf of salmonella victims. In 2010, U.S. Magistrate Judge Michael Urbanski in Lynchburg, Va. awarded victims $12.75 million, payable from the company’s insurance policy.

Marler notes that federal prosecutors are inconsistent about seeking criminal penalties under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Because there was evidence that the Parnells knew their products were probably contaminated, the charges against them were not so surprising.

But in other instances, Marler said it’s hard to tell why some food producers, like the Jensen brothers, whose cantaloupe was tainted with listeria, were prosecuted, but the family members who own Bidart Bros., linked to listeria in caramel apples, were not-or at least not yet.

“If you’re going to prosecute some, you damn well ought to prosecute others who are similarly situated,” Marler said. “Otherwise, it undercuts the rule of law.”

After the Senate Appropriations Committee passed a bill that fell short of providing the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the resources it needs to implement the Food Safety Modernization Act, U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) today vowed to continue working to fully fund the effort. An amendment – offered by Durbin – that would have increased funding for food safety activities by nearly $69 million failed along party lines to receive the votes needed to be included in the final bill.

“The food safety allocation in this bill, falls short of what is needed to reduce foodborne illness in this country,” said Durbin. “I am hopeful that as this funding bill moves through the appropriations process, we can work across the aisle to increase the funding for FDA’s implement the Food Safety Modernization Act – a law that enjoys broad support from a diverse group of stakeholders.”

An announcement this morning by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that Aspen Foods is recalling nearly 2 million pounds of frozen food that may be contaminated with Salmonella highlighted the need for increased vigilance. Every year, infections from deadly pathogens like Salmonella, E. coli and Listeria lead to an estimated 48 million illnesses and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. – with an annual price tag of $70 billion.

FDA estimates that it needs a total of $276 million in additional funding to implement the Food Safety Modernization Act. The President’s budget, which requested an increase of $109.5 million over FY15, would help close this funding gap by enabling FDA to retrain thousands of inspectors in the new prevention-based oversight system; provide technical assistance to more than 300,000 industry stakeholders; and build a new food import oversight system. The spending bill approved today by the Appropriations Committee included only $45 million in additional funding for implementing FSMA.

Babrber_Foods_Chicken_Kiev_USDA_largeCDC: Consumers should check their freezers for the recalled Chicken Kiev product and should not eat it.

The Minnesota Department of Health and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, along with CDC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS), are investigating two outbreaks of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned stuffed chicken entrees.

In one outbreak, four people infected with a strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota. Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

In the second outbreak, three people infected with a different strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from Minnesota. Two of these ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

On July 1, 2015, USDA-FSIS issued a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken products.

USDA-FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare and cook these products. Read more on the Advice to Consumers page.

As a result of the first investigation, on July 2, 2015, Barber Foods recalled approximately 58,320 pounds of Chicken Kiev because it may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis.

The product subject to recall includes a 2 lb.-4 oz. box containing six individually pouched pieces of “Barber Foods Premium Entrees Breaded-Boneless Raw Stuffed Chicken Breasts with Rib Meat Kiev” with use by/sell by dates of April 28, 2016, May 20, 2016, and July 21, 2016.

In 2014 Minnesota Public health and agriculture investigators in identified 6 cases of Salmonella Enteriditis linked to consumption of Antioch Farms brand A La Kiev raw stuffed chicken breast. Illness onsets occurred in August and September 2014. The outbreak strain was isolated in packages purchased at grocery stores.

In addition, similar products were linked to Salmonella outbreaks in 2005 S. Heidelberg2005-6 S. Enteritidis and 2006-S. Typhimurium.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

558b154b1a3d8.imageAccording to local press reports, an additional 40 people have been identified with symptoms consistent with salmonellosis — this time in Davie County, North Carolina.  There also appear to be dozens more.

The Davidson County and Davie County health departments began this week began working with the North Carolina Division of Public Health to investigate a gastrointestinal illness outbreak among patrons of Tarheel Q, located at 6835 West U.S. 64 in Lexington. As of Tuesday, the health departments had identified more than 30 individuals in Davidson County with signs and symptoms consistent with salmonellosis.

On Wednesday, the investigation expanded to include 40 additional people in Davie County.

Health officials said all people with symptoms ate at Tarheel Q, located at 6835 West U.S. 64 in Lexington, several days before becoming ill.

At least seven of the individuals had to be hospitalized due to their illness.

A sign posted on the door Wednesday said the restaurant would close until Monday, June 29, “to ensure all areas of our operation are of the highest standard.”

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

635700770319677840-boise-co-op-kitchenThe Central District Health Department (CDHD) is investigating a salmonella outbreak associated with the Boise Co-op deli – specifically food purchased from the deli after June 1, 2015.

As of June 17, 2015, 200 cases of Salmonella are associated with this outbreak. Preliminary test results showed Salmonella growth in raw turkey, tomatoes and onion. However, additional laboratory tests are pending.

Salmonella is a bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria.

Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States.

  • Report Foodborne Illness Here
  • Or call the salmonella information line at 321-2222 with questions or to file a report

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

 

Salmonella paratyphi B.pngCasey Blake of the Asheville Citizen Times reported today that the number of reported cases in a three-month Buncombe-based – Tempeh caused – Salmonella Paratyphi B outbreak is still climbing. The total number of reported cases linked to the outbreak was 83 as of Friday afternoon, 62 of which involved residents of Buncombe County. The total count includes cases of people who visited or otherwise had connections to Buncombe County and were believed to have been exposed to the bacteria here.

Agriculture officials have isolated the strain of salmonella that struck in late February — called paratyphi B — to one ingredient: A starter culture distributed by Tempeh Online of Rockville, Maryland to local company Smiling Hara Tempeh.

Paratyphi B is a rare type of salmonella in part because it has a 30-day incubation period as opposed to one to 10 days found in more common types. The disease causes diarrhea that may be bloody, high fever, headache and abdominal pain. It is rarely fatal but can be dangerous to the young, elderly or people with weak immune systems.