The two largest reported outbreaks of Hepatitis A are offering in San Diego and Southern Michigan.

San Diego

Cases Deaths Hospitalizations
507 19 (3.7%) 351 (69%)

Southern Michigan

Cases Hospitalizations Deaths
397 320 (85.6%) 15 (4.0%)

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Hepatitis A outbreaks. The Hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Hepatitis A lawyers have litigated Hepatitis A cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of sources, such as green onions, lettuce and restaurant food.  The law firm has brought Hepatitis A lawsuits against such companies as Costco, Subway, McDonald’s, Red Robin, Chipotle, Quiznos and Carl’s Jr.  We proudly represented the family of Donald Rockwell, who died after consuming hepatitis A tainted food and Richard Miller, who required a liver transplant after eating food at a Chi-Chi’s restaurant.

If you or a family member became ill with a Hepatitis A infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Hepatitis A attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Public health officials and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) are continuing to see an elevated number of hepatitis A cases in the City of Detroit, and counties of Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, Wayne, and St Clair.

Since the beginning of the outbreak in August 2016, public health response has included increased healthcare awareness efforts, public notification and education, and outreach with vaccination clinics for high-risk populations.No common sources of food, beverages, or drugs have been identified as a potential source of infection. Transmission appears to be through direct person-to-person spread and illicit drug use. Those with history of injection and non-injection drug use, homelessness or transient housing, and incarceration are thought to be at greater risk in this outbreak setting. Notably, this outbreak has had a high hospitalization rate.

Southeast Michigan Hepatitis A Outbreak Cases and Deaths as of October 12, 2017

Cases Hospitalizations Deaths
397 320 (85.6%) 15 (4.0%)

The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH), in full cooperation with Marco’s Pizza of Anniston, has been investigating, notifying, and educating those who ate food from Marco’s Pizza in Anniston between the dates of September 26 through October 2. During this period, an ill employee worked and was later diagnosed with Hepatitis A (Hep A) infection. ADPH has recommended that individuals who ate food from Marco’s Pizza of Anniston during this period, and are not up to date on Hepatitis A vaccine, be vaccinated by Monday, October 16, 2017.

ADPH has contacted several pharmacies and private providers in Calhoun County to assist with vaccinating people against Hep A. Calhoun County Health Department has administered approximately 100 doses of Hep A vaccine this week to persons meeting these requirements. ADPH would like to thank Marco’s Pizza of Anniston, Calhoun County Health Department, and the local pharmacies and providers in Calhoun County who assisted with this event.

Based on the demand for the vaccine, the Calhoun County Health Department has acquired additional doses of Hep A vaccine and immune globulin (IG) to conduct a final clinic to ensure those who ate food from Marco’s Pizza of Anniston during the date range identified can get the recommended preventive vaccine. Please call Calhoun County Health Department immediately to schedule an appointment for Monday October 16, 2017 between 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m.

If patrons and/or their friends or family members become ill in the next few weeks with symptoms that may include fever, feeling tired, decreased appetite, nausea and/or vomiting, stomach pain or discomfort, dark urine, clay-colored stool, joint pain, and/or yellowing of skin or eyes, they should contact their healthcare provider.

Additionally, ADPH would like to acknowledge and commend the management at Marco’s Pizza of Anniston. They have remained cooperative and very concerned about workers and patrons.

Please call Calhoun County Health Department at (256) 237-7523 today to schedule an appointment if you ate food from Marco’s Pizza of Anniston between the dates of September 26 through October 2, and are not up to date on vaccination for Hepatitis A.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Hepatitis A outbreaks. The Hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Hepatitis A lawyers have litigated Hepatitis A cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of sources, such as green onions, lettuce and restaurant food.  The law firm has brought Hepatitis A lawsuits against such companies as Costco, Subway, McDonald’s, Red Robin, Chipotle, Quiznos and Carl’s Jr.  We proudly represented the family of Donald Rockwell, who died after consuming hepatitis A tainted food and Richard Miller, who required a liver transplant after eating food at a Chi-Chi’s restaurant.

If you or a family member became ill with a Hepatitis A infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Hepatitis A attorneys for a free case evaluation.

There have been 576 cases throughout California, including 490 in San Diego County and 71 in Santa Cruz County. Of those, 386 have been hospitalized, including 342 in San Diego and 33 in Santa Cruz.  There have been 18 deaths.

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today issued an emergency proclamation that allows the state to increase its supply of hepatitis A vaccines in order to control the current outbreak. Immunizations from the federal vaccine program have been distributed to at-risk populations in affected areas, but additional supplies are needed. Today’s proclamation gives the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) authority to immediately purchase vaccines directly from manufacturers and distribute them to impacted communities.

Later today, CDPH officials will host a call for reporters regarding the current hepatitis A outbreak and efforts to increase the supply of adult hepatitis A vaccines. Credentialed media may join the 2:00 p.m. PDT call by dialing 800-230-1059; when prompted, provide the title of the call: “Hepatitis A CDPH.”

For additional information about the hepatitis A outbreak, visit the CDPH website.

The full text of the proclamation is below:

PROCLAMATION OF A STATE OF EMERGENCY

WHEREAS California is currently experiencing the largest person-to-person hepatitis A virus outbreak in the United States since the hepatitis A vaccine became available 22 years ago; and

WHEREAS several counties have declared local outbreaks due to the unprecedented number of hepatitis A virus infections, particularly among persons experiencing homelessness and some illicit drug users; and

WHEREAS vaccinating at-risk populations and improving sanitation are the most effective ways to stop the person-to-person spread of the hepatitis A virus; and

WHEREAS controlling outbreaks minimizes the risk to the public, maintains the health and safety of the people of California, and limits the health risks to at-risk populations in affected locations; and

WHEREAS the federally-funded supply of vaccines is inadequate to meet the State’s current needs, and therefore, California must directly obtain the vaccine; and

WHEREAS sustaining the timely and effective local response will require State support to provide adequate vaccines, supplies, and resources; and

WHEREAS under the provisions of section 8558(b) of the Government Code, I find that these circumstances constitute a state of emergency; and

WHEREAS under the provisions of section 8571 of the Government Code, I find that strict compliance with the various statutes and regulations specified in this order would prevent, hinder, or delay the mitigation of the effects of the outbreak.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor of the State of California, in accordance with the authority vested in me by the state Constitution and statutes, including the California Emergency Services Act, and in particular, section 8625 of the California Government Code, HEREBY PROCLAIM A STATE OF EMERGENCY to exist in California.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED THAT:

1. The California Department of Public Health shall take all measures necessary to obtain hepatitis A vaccines and prioritize the vaccination of at-risk individuals in affected locations.
2. All drugs and medical supply stocks intended for wholesale distribution shall be held subject to the control and coordination of the California Department of Public Health as necessary to control the hepatitis A outbreak.

3. Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic licensees in the affected locations shall have the authority to administer the appropriate vaccines to at-risk populations. To the extent that the provisions of Health and Safety Code sections 1797.52 and 1797.21 prohibit Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic licensees from administering the appropriate vaccines to at-risk populations, those statutes are hereby waived.

I FURTHER DIRECT that as soon as hereafter possible, this proclamation be filed in the Office of the Secretary of State and that widespread publicity and notice be given of this proclamation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Great Seal of the State of California to be affixed this 13th day of October 2017.

__________________________
EDMUND G. BROWN JR.
Governor of California

ATTEST:

__________________________
ALEX PADILLA
Secretary of State

Since early 2017, the Public Health Services Division, in the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency, has been investigating a local Hepatitis A outbreak. The majority of people who have contracted hepatitis A are homeless and/or illicit drug users, although some cases have been neither.  The outbreak is being spread person-to-person and through contact with a fecally contaminated environment.  No common sources of food, beverage or drugs have been identified that have contributed to this outbreak, though investigation is ongoing.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that person-to-person transmission through close contact is the primary way people get hepatitis A in the United States.

Vaccination efforts are being implemented in targeted locations by County staff and in collaboration with health care partners. Health providers are asked to inform the Epidemiology Program if they have a patient suspected to have the hepatitis A infection, before the patient leaves the emergency department or provider’s office (see contact number below).

On September 1, 2017, the San Diego County Public Health Officer declared a local public health emergency due to the ongoing hepatitis A virus outbreak in the county. The County Board of Supervisors ratified this declaration on September 6, 2017 and again on September 12, 2017. The declaration shall be ratified every two weeks by the County Board of Supervisors until the declaration is rescinded.

For information and resources, please click on the links below:

The table below will provide a weekly update of total cases, deaths, and hospitalizations.  Following this update is information about hepatitis A to educate the community and help prevent the continual spread of this viral infection.

San Diego County Hepatitis A Outbreak Cases and Deaths as of October 10, 2017*
*Table will be updated weekly each Tuesday

Cases Deaths Hospitalizations
490 18 (3.7%) 342 (70%)

Since early 2017, the Public Health Services Division, in the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency, has been investigating a local Hepatitis A outbreak. The majority of people who have contracted hepatitis A are homeless and/or illicit drug users, although some cases have been neither.  The outbreak is being spread person-to-person and through contact with a fecally contaminated environment.  No common sources of food, beverage or drugs have been identified that have contributed to this outbreak, though investigation is ongoing.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that person-to-person transmission through close contact is the primary way people get hepatitis A in the United States.

Vaccination efforts are being implemented in targeted locations by County staff and in collaboration with health care partners. Health providers are asked to inform the Epidemiology Program if they have a patient suspected to have the hepatitis A infection, before the patient leaves the emergency department or provider’s office (see contact number below).

On September 1, 2017, the San Diego County Public Health Officer declared a local public health emergency due to the ongoing hepatitis A virus outbreak in the county. The County Board of Supervisors ratified this declaration on September 6, 2017 and again on September 12, 2017. The declaration shall be ratified every two weeks by the County Board of Supervisors until the declaration is rescinded.

For information and resources, please click on the links below:

The table below will provide a weekly update of total cases, deaths, and hospitalizations.  Following this update is information about hepatitis A to educate the community and help prevent the continual spread of this viral infection.

San Diego County Hepatitis A Outbreak Cases and Deaths as of October 3, 2017*

Cases Deaths Hospitalizations
481 17 (3.7%) 337 (70%)

The Wayne County Department of Health, Veterans and Community Wellness is investigating cases of Hepatitis A related to two Grosse Pointe restaurants.

The restaurants are Uncle Paul’s Pizza on Mack Ave. and Cabbage Patch Cafe and Catering on Kercheval Avenue.

Both establishments have voluntarily closed and are working with WCDHVCW during the investigation.

WCDHVCW is advising people who consumed food from these establishments between Aug. 1 and Sept. 29, 2017 to watch for symptoms of Hepatitis A which can include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dark urine, clay colored stool, fever, chills, yellow skin and eyes (jaundice).

Symptoms occur between 15 and 50 days after exposure and can last for several weeks to months.

Since early 2017, the Public Health Services Division, in the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency, has been investigating a local Hepatitis A outbreak. The majority of people who have contracted hepatitis A are homeless and/or illicit drug users, although some cases have been neither.  The outbreak is being spread person-to-person and through contact with a fecally contaminated environment.  No common sources of food, beverage or drugs have been identified that have contributed to this outbreak, though investigation is ongoing.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that person-to-person transmission through close contact is the primary way people get hepatitis A in the United States.

Vaccination efforts are being implemented in targeted locations by County staff and in collaboration with health care partners. Health providers are asked to inform the Epidemiology Program if they have a patient suspected to have the hepatitis A infection, before the patient leaves the emergency department or provider’s office (see contact number below).

On September 1, 2017, the San Diego County Public Health Officer declared a local public health emergency due to the ongoing hepatitis A virus outbreak in the county. The County Board of Supervisors ratified this declaration on September 6, 2017 and again on September 12, 2017. The declaration shall be ratified every two weeks by the County Board of Supervisors until the declaration is rescinded.

For information and resources, please click on the links below:

The table below will provide a weekly update of total cases, deaths, and hospitalizations.  Following this update is information about hepatitis A to educate the community and help prevent the continual spread of this viral infection.

San Diego County Hepatitis A Outbreak Cases and Deaths as of September 26, 2017*
*Table will be updated weekly each Tuesday

Cases Deaths Hospitalizations
461 17 (4%) 315 (68%)

Please note: Table does not include all reported hepatitis A cases in the county; only those that are local-outbreak-related. Also, data are provisional and subject to change.

Baked goods sold at the Meijer in Mount Pleasant could be contaminated with Hepatitis A, state officials warned on Thursday.

A bakery worker from the store at 1015 Pickard St. tested positive for Hepatitis A on Thursday. Anyone who ate items purchased from the bakery between Aug. 23 and Sept. 20 may have been exposed to the virus, according to a press release from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Affected baked goods will bear the Meijer Bakery label, including individual items such as single doughnuts and rolls from the self-serve case. Anyone who has any affected products in their home should discard them immediately. Freezing does not kill the hepatitis A virus.

Only products from the Mount Pleasant Meijer bakery are affected. There is no danger from bakeries at other Meijer locations or from other departments at the store.

The Health and Human Services Department says no illnesses have been identified from this exposure and the risk is low. However, health officials say anyone who ate baked goods from the Meijer should watch for symptoms of hepatitis A.

Symptoms include sudden onset of abdominal discomfort, dark urine, fever, diarrhea, and yellow skin and eyes. Time from exposure to onset of illness (incubation period) is typically 15 to 50 days.

Hepatitis A illnesses typically last several weeks to several months. Most people will recover with no lasting effects.

The Hepatitis A vaccine may provide protection against the disease if administered within two weeks of exposure. State health officials are urging anyone who ate baked goods from the Meijer to contact a physician to find out whether they qualify for the vaccine.

Meijer is offering the Hepatitis A vaccine for free at the Mount Pleasant store. It also will be available at other pharmacies around the city.

The Central Michigan District Health Department is working with Meijer to provide vaccines to any of their bakery employees and to ensure they are following recommend guidelines.

Anyone who already had Hepatitis A or received two doses of the vaccine don’t need to worry about getting vaccinated again.

The best protection for avoiding a Hepatitis A infection is traditional handwashing precautions and thoroughly cooking foods to their recommended temperatures.

Anyone who develops symptoms of hepatitis A infection should stay home and contact their health care provider.

Anyone with questions or looking for assistance in locating the Hepatitis A vaccine is asked to the call the Central Michigan District Health Department.

Hepatitis A has continued to spread in southeast Michigan with 319 confirmed cases between Aug. 1, 2016 and Sept. 15 — resulting in 14 deaths, state health officials announced Thursday.

The cases in Detroit and Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Monroe and St. Clair counties represent a 16-fold increase over the same period in 2014-15.

Eighty-one cases were diagnosed last month alone, compared with six reported to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services in August 2016.

“The southeast Michigan hepatitis A outbreak remains a top priority for public health officials from both the investigation and prevention standpoints,” Dr. Eden Wells, chief medical executive for MDHHS, said in a press release Thursday.

“Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable disease and in addition to our investigation of current and new cases, our focus is strongly aimed at increasing vaccination in adults, where hepatitis A vaccination is commonly low.”

Health officials have doubled down on efforts to fight the outbreak through increased awareness. The highly contagious viral liver disease can sometimes cause liver failure and death, but is easily prevented by getting vaccinated.

The state agency said no common source of the outbreak, such as contaminated food or water, has been identified. Transmission appears to be person-to-person, mostly through illicit drug use, sexual activity and other close contact.

MDHHS sent a letter to 5,069 Medicaid-enrolled health care providers across southeast Michigan earlier this month with information about the outbreak and the need for people to get vaccinated.

They said many vaccination campaigns are in place across the region, with some focusing on high-risk populations at jails, substance use treatment centers and homeless centers.

DHHS also has been in discussions with the Michigan Department of Corrections about implementing a vaccination campaign in the Detroit Receiving Center and Detroit Detention Center, they said.
Local health departments also are partnering with community organizations to provide hepatitis A vaccine to at-risk individuals, officials said. More than half of those diagnosed have a history of substance abuse, and 15 percent are homeless or living in shelters, according to DHHS.

Individuals with hepatitis A are infectious for two weeks before symptoms appear. The symptoms include jaundice (yellowing of the skin), fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine and light-colored stools.

People most at risk are those living with someone who has hepatitis A, having sexual contact with someone who has hepatitis A, or sharing injection or non-injection illegal drugs with someone who has hepatitis A. The virus also can be transmitted through contaminated food or water.

Public Health Announces Hepatitis A Outbreak in LA County  – Hepatitis A vaccine is the best protection

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) has declared a local outbreak of hepatitis A (HAV) in Los Angeles County because the most recent new cases appear to be locally acquired.Hepatitis A outbreaks are currently ongoing in San Diego and Santa Cruz counties. The large majority of cases have occurred in persons who are homeless and/or use illicit drugs (injection and non-injection), with several cases also occurring among people who provide services to the homeless.

Public Health has confirmed 10 total cases of hepatitis A among high-risk individuals (those that are homeless or in institutions that serve the homeless) in Los Angeles County. Of the confirmed cases, four had been in San Diego and one had been in Santa Cruz during their exposure period. Three secondary cases occurred in a health care facility in Los Angeles County. The two most recent cases appear to have acquired their infection locally within Los Angeles County.

“Public Health has been proactively preparing for an outbreak for some time and is working diligently to prevent spread in local communities. Our priorities are to keep all our residents both safe and well informed of the situation,” said Jeffrey Gunzenhauser, MD, MPH, Interim Health Officer, Los Angeles County. “Vaccination is the best protection against Hepatitis A. With this in mind, our outreach teams and clinics are offering free vaccine to persons who are homeless, active drug users, and those who provide services and support to those individuals.”

A person can get hepatitis A if they come into contact with an infected person’s feces through contaminated food or objects. The hepatitis A virus can spread when a person does not properly wash their hands after going to the bathroom or changing diapers. Other modes of transmission include certain sexual practices, sharing equipment related to illicit drug use, and consumption of food or water contaminated with the virus. People who are homeless are at higher risk because they face challenges to maintaining good hygiene.

Physicians are required to report HAV cases to Public Health. HAV causes acute liver disease, which may be severe. It is transmitted by contact with feces from a person who is infected – often through contact with food or water or during sex or other close contact. Signs and symptoms of acute HAV include fever, malaise, dark urine, lack of appetite, nausea, and stomach pain, followed by jaundice. Symptoms generally last for less than 2 months although some persons may have prolonged or more severe illness. Infection can be prevented in close contacts of patients by vaccination or administration of immune globulin within 2-weeks following exposure. If you experience these symptoms, contact your physician.

Although Hepatitis A is very contagious, you can take the following steps to prevent Hepatitis A:

  • Get vaccinated for Hepatitis A
  • Don’t have sex with someone who has Hepatitis A infection
  • Use your own towels, toothbrushes and eating utensils
  • Don’t share food, drinks, or smokes with other people
  • Wash hands with soap and water after using the bathroom, changing diapers, and before preparing, serving or eating food.

Public Health continues surveillance for cases and is working closely with healthcare providers and organizations that serve the homeless population to protect the health of patients/clients, staff and the community. Public Health is providing education and vaccination to the homeless and those who work with them, and working with other organizations that provide services for the homeless population to reach this community. Hepatitis A vaccination is available at Public Health clinics or from your health care provider. County residents may call the LA County Information line at 2-1- 1 from any landline or cell phone within the county for referrals to providers offering vaccines at no-cost or a reduced cost. For patients without access to HAV vaccine, Public Health will have vaccine available at its Public Health Centers located throughout the County.