Since June 11, 2018, Public Health has learned of 17 people from a single meal party who became ill after consuming food and beverage from a buffet at Lahori Kabab-n-Grill in Kent on June 10, 2018. Symptoms and timing of their illness onset are suggestive of a bacterial toxin, such as Bacillus cereus or Clostridium perfringens.

The exact food or drink item that caused the illness has not been identified, though this is not uncommon for outbreaks associated with a bacterial toxin.

Ruiz Food Products, Inc., a Denison, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 50,706 pounds of frozen breakfast burritos that may be contaminated with extraneous material, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen cook and serve breakfast burritos were produced on March 3, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Label (PDF only)]

  • 3.38-lb. plastic wrapped packages containing 12 Count, 4.5-ounce individually wrapped frozen “EL MONTEREY SIGNATURE BURRITOS, EGG, SAUSAGE, CHEESE & POTATO” with lot code 18062 and 18063, and a best if used date of 3/3/2019 or 3/4/2019.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 17523A” on the back of the packaging. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered after the company received complaints from consumers who reported finding white, semi-rigid plastic pieces in the product.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Eddy Packing Co., Inc., a Yoakum, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 18,390 pounds of smoked sausage that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically soft plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen, ready-to-eat smoked sausage items were produced on March 14, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Label (PDF only)]

• 10-lb. case of “CARL’S PORK AND BEEF SMOKED SAUSAGE WITH A STICK” with lot code 8073, case code PS9319 and sell by date of March 14, 2019.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST 4800” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to food service businesses in Texas.

The problem was discovered after the company received a customer complaint about soft, green plastic material found in the product.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers after having purchased the product from food service businesses. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Hormel Food Corp., a Fremont, NE establishment, is recalling approximately 228,614 pounds of canned pork and chicken products that may be contaminated with foreign matter, specifically pieces of metal, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The canned pork and chicken products were produced on February 8 through February 10, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Labels (PDF only)]

  • 12-oz. metal cans containing “SPAM Classic” with a “Best By” February 2021 date and production codes: F020881, F020882, F020883, F020884, F020885, F020886, F020887, F020888 and F020889. These products were shipped throughout the United States.
  • 12-oz. metal cans containing “Hormel Foods Black-Label Luncheon Loaf” with a “Best By” February 2021 date and production codes F02098 and F02108. These products were shipped to Guam only.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 199N” on the bottom of the can. These items were shipped throughout the United States and to Guam.

The problem was discovered after the firm received four consumer complaints stating that metal objects were found in the canned products. FSIS was notified on May 25, 2018.

There have been reports of minor oral injuries associated with consumption of the products. FSIS has received no additional reports of injury or illness from consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ food pantries. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

As of April 18, 2018, 53 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 16 states. Alaska 1, Arizona 3, California 1, Connecticut 2, Idaho, 10, Illinois 1, Louisiana 1, Michigan 2, Missouri 1, Montana 6, New Jersey 7, New York 2, Ohio 2, Pennsylvania, 12, Virginia 1 and Washington , linked to chopped romaine lettuce grown in Yuma California.

Outbreaks associated with lettuce and other leafy greens are by no means a new phenomenon. Outlined below is a list of E. coli and other pathogen outbreaks involving contaminated lettuce or leafy greens – Thanks to the folks at http://www.barfblog.com for compiling a rather stunning list of outbreaks – in PDF FORM.  Thanks to Doug and Ben.

Date Causative Agent Illnesses Reported Source
Nov. 2017- Dec. 2017 E. coli O157:H7 41, 1 death  romaine lettuce
Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 Listeria monocytogenes 19, 1 death package salads
Apr. 2015 Escherichia coli, Shiga toxin-producing 7 prepackaged leafy greens
Mar. 2015 E. coli O157:H7 12 leafy greens
Jul. 2014 E. coli O111 15 Salad/cabbage served at Applebee’s  and Yard House (Minnesota)
Oct. 2013 E. coli O157:H7 33 Pre-packaged salads and sandwich wraps (California)
Jul. 2013 E. coli O157:H7 94 Lettuce served at Federico’s Mexican Restaurant
Jul. 2013 Cyclospora 140 (Iowa); 87 (Nebraska) Salad mix, cilantro
Dec. 2012 – Jan. 2013 E. coli O157:H7 31 Shredded lettuce from Freshpoint, Inc.
Oct. 2012 E. coli O157:H7 33 Leafy greens salad mix (Massachusetts)
Apr. 2012 E. coli O157:H7 28 Romaine lettuce
Dec. 2011 Salmonella Hartford 5 Lettuce; roast beef
Dec. 2011 Norovirus 9 Lettuce, unspecified
Oct. 2011 E. coli O157:H7 58 Romaine lettuce
Oct. 2011 E. coli O157:H7 26 Lettuce
Aug. 2011 N/A 8 Lettuce; onions; tomatoes
Jul. 2011 Cyclospora cayatenensis 99 Lettuce based salads
Jun. 2011 Norovirus 23 Garden salad
Apr. 2011 Salmonella Typhimirum 36 Multiple salads
Feb. 2011 Norovirus 24 Garden salad
Jan. 2011 Norovirus 93 Lettuce; salad, unspecified
Jul.-Oct. 2010 Salmonella Java 136 Salad vegetable
May 2010 E. coli O145 33
(26 lab-confirmed)
Romaine Lettuce grown in Arizona
Apr. 2010 Salmonella Hvittingfoss 102 Lettuce, tomatoes, and olives served at Subway restaurants
Jan. 2010 E. coli 260 Lettuce grown in France
Dec. 2009 Norovirus 16 Lettuce
Aug. 2009 SalmonellaTyphimurium 27 Lettuce
Aug. 2009 Salmonella spp 124 Romaine lettuce; Recalls issued by Tanimura & Antle, Inc. (lettuce), Muranaka Farm, Inc. (parsley), and Frontera Produce (cilantro)
Jul. 2009 SalmonellaTyphimurium 145 Shredded lettuce from Taylor Farms
May. 2009 Norovirus 10 Lettuce, onion, and tomato in chicken salad
Nov. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 130 Romaine lettuce
Oct. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 2 Chopped shredded iceberg lettuce (Michigan)
Oct. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 43 (Johnathan’s Family Restaurant), 21 (Little Red Rooster Restaurant), 12 (M.T. Bellies Restaurant) Lettuce
Oct. 2008 Norovirus 64 Tomato relish, lettuce-based salad
Aug.-Sep. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 74 Lettuce  from Aunt Mid’s Produce Company (California)
Aug.-Oct. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 13 Spinach (Oregon)
May. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 10 Prepackaged lettuce
May. 2008 E. coli O157:H7 6 Pre-packaged salad
May 2008 E. coli O157:H7 9 Lettuce (California, U.S.)
Apr. 2008 Salmonella Branderup 12 Green salad, tomato
Jul. 2007 Shigella sonnei 72 Salad
Jul. 2007 E. coli O157:H7 26 Lettuce
Feb. 2007 Norovirus 8 Lettuce
Jan. 2007 Norovirus 9 Salad
Nov. 2006 E. coli O157:H7 78 Lettuce
Oct. 2006 E. coli O157:H7 205 Pre-packaged baby spinach from Dole Food Company (California)
Sep. 2006 Norovirus 9 Salad
Sep. 2005 E. coli O157:H7 34 Prepackaged bagged lettuce from Dole Food Company
Jun. 2006 SalmonellaTyphimurium 18 Lettuce, tomatoes
Oct. 2005 E. coli O157:H7 12 grapes, green; lettuce, prepackaged
Nov. 2004 E. coli O157:H7 6 Lettuce, unspecified
Jul. 2004 Salmonella Newport 97 Iceberg lettuce
Nov. 2003 E. coli O157:H7 19 Spinach, unspecified
Oct. 2003 E. coli O157:H7 16 Spinach, unspecified
Sep. 2003 E. coli O157:H7 51 Lettuce-based salads, unspecified
Nov. 2002 E. coli O157:H7 60 Romaine lettuce
Jul. 2002 E. coli O157:H7 32 Romaine lettuce from Spokane Produce (Washington)
Jul. 2002 E. coli O157:H7 55 Caesar salad
Nov. 2001 E. coli O157:H7 20 Lettuce-based salads, unspecified
Oct. 2000 E. coli O157:H7 6 Salad
May 2000 Campylobacter
jejuni
13 Salad
May 2000 Norovirus 3 Salad
Feb. 2000 Norovirus 7 Salad
Oct. 1999 E. coli O157:H7 45 Lettuce, salad
Oct. 1999 E. coli O157:H7 47 Salad
Oct. 1999 Norovirus 16 Salad
Sep. 1999 E. coli O157:H11 6 Lettuce
Sep. 1999 Norovirus 115 Lettuce
Sep. 1999 E. coli O111:H8 58 Salad
Aug. 1999 Norovirus 25 Salad
May 1999 Norovirus 28 Salad
Feb. 1999 E. coli O157:H7 72 Lettuce
May 1998 E. coli O157:H7 2 Salad
May 1996 E. coli O157:H7 61 Lettuce
Oct. 1995 E. coli O153:H46 11 Lettuce
Sep. 1995 E. coli O153:H47 30 Lettuce
Sep. 1995 E. coli O157:H7 21 Lettuce
Jul. 1995 E. coli O153:H48 74 Lettuce

 

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clarkhave represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smithand Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coliinfection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Blue Ridge Beef of Eatonton, GA, is voluntarily recalling lot#GA0131 of BRB Complete raw pet food because of the potential of contamination with Salmonellaand Listeria monocytogenes.

The cause of the recall:

This recall was initiated after samples collected and tested by the FDA showed positive for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. There has been no consumer or pet illnesses in association with this product. Blue Ridge Beef is voluntarily recalling this product lot as a commitment to consumer and pet health and safety.

About Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes:

Salmonella and Listeria can cause severe and potentially fatal infection in both the animals consuming the pet food, and the humans that handle the pet food.  There is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surface exposed to these products. Pets can be carriers of the bacteria and infect humans, even if the pets do not appear to be ill. Once Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes gets established in the pet’s gastrointestinal tract, the animal can shed the bacteria when it has a bowel movement, and the contamination will continue to spread.

Groups at high risk for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes include the elderly, people with weakened immune systems and certain chronic medical conditions (such as cancer), and pregnant women.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves and their pets for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product or pets that have consumed this product should contact their healthcare provider. Pet owners should contact a veterinarian if their pet shows symptoms. Consumers should also follow the simple handling tips on the package.

The recalled lot would affect the following states:
Florida
Georgia
South Carolina
Tennessee
North Carolina

The affected product is sold in two pound chubs that are frozen and are distinguished by the manufacturing codes:
BRB Complete
Lot# GA0131
Manufacturing date: 01/31/2018

Darwin’s Natural Pet Products of Tukwila, Wash., a manufacturer of fresh raw meals for dogs, today announced it is voluntarily recalling a total of four lots of products after testing showed that some of the Chicken and Duck with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs may contain Salmonella, and the Turkey with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs sample may contain Salmonella and E. coli O128.  These pathogens can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections.

Darwin’s Natural Pet Products are exclusively sold to customers through a subscription service. Customers who purchased the products have been notified of the recall directly by Darwin’s.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products, and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Specifically, E. coli O128 was identified in the contaminated raw turkey pet food product, and is among the most clinically relevant Shiga Toxin Producing E. coli (STEC) in humans.  E. coli O128 causes illness indistinguishable from E. coli O157:H7.  The symptoms include diarrhea, often with bloody stools.

Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly. The condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death. E. coli O128  is unknown to cause illness in dogs and cats, but infected animals can become carriers of E. coli O128 and transfer the bacteria to the home environment.

The pet food included in the recall is as follows:

• Natural Selections Chicken with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs, Net wt. 2lbs., Lot #43887, manufacture date 1/30/2018

• Natural Selections Duck with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs, Net wt. 2lbs., Lot #44147, manufacture date 2/5/2018

• ZooLogics Chicken Meals with Organic Vegetables for Dogs, Net wt. 2lbs., Lot #44037, manufacture date 2/7/2018

• ZooLogics Turkey with Organic Vegetables Meals for Dogs, Net wt. 2lbs., Lot #44127, manufacture date 2/4/2018

Radagast Pet Food, Inc. of Portland, OR is recalling one lot of Free-Range Chicken and one lot of Free-Range Turkey Recipe because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

This recall includes only the two lots listed below.

Listeria monocytogenes is pathogenic to humans. Healthy people exposed to Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, fever. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Listeria monocytogenes can affect animals eating the product. Animals exposed to Listeria monocytogenes can display symptoms such as: diarrhea, fever, muscular or respiratory signs and anorexia. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

No pet or human illnesses have been reported.

The single lot of Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Chicken Lot 62762, BB Date: 10/19/18, was shipped to distributors in May 2017 in CA, MN, OH, OR, PA, and RI. Product has the following UPC’s:

8oz  UPC 8 51536 00103 6
16oz UPC 8 51536 00104 3
24oz UPC 8 51536 00105 0

The single lot of Rad Cat Raw Diet Free-Range Turkey Recipe, Lot 62926, BB Date: 05/03/19, was shipped in December 2017 in CA, CO, FL, GA, NY, OH, OR, RI, TX, and WA and sold through independent pet retail stores. Product has the following UPC’s:

8oz  UPC 8 51536 00100 5
16oz UPC 8 51536 00101 2
24oz UPC 8 51536 00102 9

Food safety attorney William (Bill) Marler is available to consult those affected by the ongoing Listeria outbreak in the European Union. EFSA and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) announced today that frozen corn is the likely source of the Listeria outbreak affecting Austria, Denmark, Finland, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. As of March 8, 2018, there have been 32 confirmed cases and 6 deaths.

The implicated frozen corn was packed in Poland and processed and produced in Hungary. The products have been withdrawn and recalled by food operators in Poland, Finland, Sweden, and Estonia.

Bill Marler is the United States’ leading expert in food safety litigation and a major force in food policy in the U.S.A. and around the world. Bill recently returned from South Africa where he is consulting on a historic class action lawsuit against Tiger Brands for causing the largest Listeria outbreak with almost 1,000 ill with 200 deaths.  Bill was interviewed today for the BBC show “The Food Chain” about the ongoing problem with processed foods and Listeria.

“Listeria is one of the most deadly foodborne pathogens whether it be in the U.S.A., South Africa or in the European Union,” said Bill Marler.  “It is critical for the food industry to combat this menace or ready to eat foods, like frozen corn and deli meats,” added Marler.

Listeria is a serious foodborne illness that once in the blood stream can cause meningitis and/or encephalitis (brain infection). In pregnant women, the fetus can become infected with Listeria, leading to spontaneous abortion, stillbirths, or sepsis in infancy. Listeria has an approximate 20% mortality rate. For victims who survive they may be left with life-altering damage.

An accomplished attorney and national expert in food safety, Bill Marler has become the most prominent foodborne illness lawyer in America and a major force in food policy in the U.S.A. and around the world.  Bill will be speaking in Italy, Spain and England this year on food safety topics.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the United States’ leading law firm representing victims of Listeria outbreaks. The Listeria lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $650 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Marler Clark has litigated Listeria cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as deli meat, cantaloupe, cheese, celery and milk.

  • About-Listeria.comis a comprehensive site with in-depth information about Listeria bacteria and listeriosis.
  • Listeria Blogprovides up-to-date news related to Listeria outbreaks, research, and more.
  • Listeria Information VideoYouTube video outlining what you need to know during a Listeria outbreak.

The Oregon Food Bank is recalling more than 60,000 pounds of donated pumpkin seeds because they could be contaminated with Listeria.

Earlier this week, the food bank recalled donated chia seeds that may have included rodent droppings. The chia seeds and pumpkin seeds were given to the food bank on the same donation.

No illnesses have been reported by either foods, but food bank officials say they found rodent droppings in chia seed donations still at their warehouse.

The pumpkin seeds were distributed in Oregon and Clark County, Wash. as well as area food banks and food pantries. They were distributed in 1-pound plastic poly film bags with a twist-type closure OR a Kale Joy plastic bag. They were distributed between Nov. 1, 2017 and March 16, 2018.

Oregon Food Bank has initiated a Class II recall of 22,201 pounds of chia seeds, which were donated to the food bank based in Portland. The product may be contaminated with rodent droppings. While no known illnesses have been associated with this product, use or consumption may present a health hazard to consumers.

The chia seeds were distributed in Oregon and Clark County, Washington through the Oregon Food Bank Network of regional food banks and participating food pantries. The product was distributed in one-pound plastic poly film bags with a twist-type closure or a re-sealable pouch. All chia seeds distributed in the described packaging between November 1, 2017 and March 9, 2018 are included. See attached product labels for ease of identification.