Clair D. Thompson & Sons, Inc., a Jersey Shore, Pa. establishment, is recalling approximately 700 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ground beef items were produced and packaged on Sept. 27 – 28, 2017 and Oct. 2, 2017. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 5-lb. plastic bags of “Thompson’s GROUND BEEF.”
  • 10-lb. plastic bags of “Thompson’s GROUND BEEF.”

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 9681” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to institutions in New York and Pennsylvania.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 2, 2017 when the firm notified FSIS that the firm’s sample of ground beef had tested positive for E. coli O157:H7 by a third party lab. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2–8 days (3–4 days, on average) after exposure the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers’ freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

Troy Neumann of WKBT reports several recent cases of E. coli are concerning some residents of the La Crosse area.

The La Crosse County Health Department is currently investigating eight reported cases of E. coli in the county. The strain found in our area is known to cause diarrhea, potentially hospitalizing young children.

The Health Department says good hygiene is one of the best and easiest things you can do to prevent an E. coli infection.

“Good hand washing after using the bathroom, good hand washing after changing diapers, good hand washing before preparing food, and good hand washing after coming in from outside are all those hand hygiene things that we would recommend that people do,” said La Crosse County Health Department Health Education Manager Paula Silha.

The La Crosse County Health Department is still investigating eight reports of E. coli in the La Crosse area.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The FDA, CDC, and state and local officials investigated a multi-state outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O121 and O26 infections. CDC reports that 63 people infected with the outbreak strains of E. coli O121, and O26 were reported from 24 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from December 21, 2015 to September 5, 2016. Seventeen ill people were hospitalized, and one person developed hemolytic-uremic syndrome. In its investigation, CDC learned that some people who got sick had eaten or handled raw dough.

FDA’s traceback investigation determined that the raw dough eaten or handled by ill people or used in restaurant locations were made using General Mills flour that was produced in November 2015 and select production dates through February 10, 2016 at the General Mills facility in Kansas City, Missouri. Epidemiology, laboratory and traceback evidence available at that time indicated that General Mills flour manufactured at this facility is the likely source of the outbreak.

On May 31, 2016, following a conference call among FDA, CDC and the firm, General Mills conducted a voluntary recall of flour products produced between November 14, 2015 and December 4, 2015. Recalled products were sold in stores nationwide but may still be in consumers’ pantries and were sold under three brand names: Gold Medal flour, Signature Kitchens flour and Gold Medal Wondra flour. The varieties include unbleached, all-purpose, and self-rising flours.

On June 10, 2016, FDA performed Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) on E. coli O121 isolates recovered from an open sample of General Mills flour belonging to a Colorado consumer who was sickened, and it was found to be closely related genetically to the clinical isolates from human illnesses. The flour came from a lot that General Mills had recalled.

Testing by FDA has identified E. coli O121 in open product samples collected from ill people in Arizona and Oklahoma. FDA’s WGS analysis of the E. coli O121 isolates from the Arizona and Oklahoma product samples showed that they were closely related genetically to the outbreak strains. The General Mills flour sample collected from the Oklahoma patient was produced outside of the company’s original recall date range. On July 1, 2016, following a call with the FDA and CDC General Mills expanded its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour.

The FDA used WGS to characterize isolates provided by General Mills to FDA. FDA provided characterization information to General Mills that an E. coli O26 isolated from their returned retail flour is closely related genetically to a clinical isolate that was subsequently added to the outbreak cluster. WGS characterization analysis of additional E. coli isolates provided by General Mills to FDA did not return other clinical isolates that were closely related genetically.

On July 25, 2016, following a call with the FDA and CDC, General Mills expanded its recall a second time to include products produced on select dates through February 10, 2016.

Flour has a long shelf life, and bags of flour may be kept in peoples’ homes for a long time.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

General Mills Flour E. coli Outbreak & Lawsuit

An E. coli O157: H7 outbreak that has shuttered three locations of the Chicken & Rice Guys, as well as its fleet of Middle Eastern food trucks, Boston health inspectors said last Tuesday. By Friday the number of ill jumped to 15 with at least 10 people hospitalized.

The department confirmed 15 cases of E. coli O157: H7 stemming from the Chicken & Rice Guys Allston location, which supplies food to the chain’s other outposts. The problems led to the suspension of its operating license.

The company’s four food trucks, which rotate locations around Greater Boston, were taken off the road Tuesday afternoon.

According to Boston Inspectional Services, the city received an anonymous complaint and opened an investigation Tuesday. Public health officials remained at the Allston site throughout the afternoon trying to determine a specific source of the outbreak.

Today Chicken & Rice Guys’ four restaurants have reopened after being linked to an outbreak of E. coli infections, but the company’s four food trucks and one pop-up eatery remain shuttered.

Omar Cabrera, a representative for the state Department of Public Health, said the state hasn’t found E. coli O157:H7 in more than 100 Chicken & Rice Guys workers tested so far. But tests were not complete for three workers as of Tuesday, said Ana Vivas, a representative for the Boston Public Health Commission.

State health officials are also awaiting test results that would confirm that all 14 people who became ill after eating at Chicken & Rice Guys have the same bacteria, Cabrera said; investigators can determine that by examining the genetic footprint of the organisms.

The cause of the infections hasn’t been determined, Cabrera and Vivas said. “It’s very difficult to say because so many parties are involved,” Vivas said, referring to food preparation and service.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Chicken and Rice Guys E. coli Outbreak

The CDC reported on May 4, 2017, that although the outbreak investigation is over, illnesses may continue for some time. The recalled SoyNut Butter products have long shelf lives and may still be in people’s homes or in institutions. People who don’t know about the recalls could continue to eat the products and get sick.

Thirty-two people infected with the outbreak strains of STEC O157:H7 were reported from 12 states. Arizona 4, California 5, Florida 2, Illinois 1, Massachusetts 1, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 11, Virginia 2, Washington 2 and Wisconsin 1. Twelve people were hospitalized. Nine people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths were reported. Twenty-six (81%) of the 32 ill people in this outbreak were younger than 18 years. Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence indicated that I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter was the likely source of this outbreak. Several soy nut products were recalled:

  • On March 7, 2017, The SoyNut Butter Company recalled all varieties of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butters and all varieties of I.M. Healthy Granola products.
  • On March 10, 2017, The SoyNut Butter Company expanded its recall to include Dixie Diner’s Club brand Carb Not Beanit Butter.
  • On March 24, 2017, Pro Sports Club recalled 20/20 Lifestyle Yogurt Peanut Crunch Bars because they contain a recalled ingredient.
  • On March 28, 2017, the FDA issued a Suspension of Food Facility Registration Order to Dixie Dew of Erlanger, Ky., after an inspection revealed insanitary conditions at the firm that could affect the safety of finished products. Dixie Dew is the contract manufacturer for SoyNut Butter Company’s soy nut butter products. The close out of the outbreak investigation does not affect the suspension order.

CDC recommends that consumers do not eat, and childcare centers, schools, and other institutions do not serve, any variety or size of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter, I.M. Healthy brand granola, Dixie Diner’s Club brand Carb Not Beanit Butter, or 20/20 Lifestyle Yogurt Peanut Crunch Bars, regardless of the date of purchase or the date listed on the container. Even if some of the product was eaten or served and no one got sick, throw the rest of it away. Put it in a sealed bag in the trash so that children, pets, or other animals can’t eat it.

The FDA announced on March 28, 2017, the FDA used authorities granted under the 2011 FDA Food Safety Modernization Act to suspend the food facility registration of Dixie Dew Products, Inc. (Dixie Dew) of Erlanger, Kentucky, because products manufactured in this facility may be contaminated.

The FDA’s decision to suspend the registration of Dixie Dew Products was prompted by the E. coli O157:H7 outbreak and the findings of FDA’s March 2017 inspection of Dixie Dew, which identified insanitary conditions that could lead to contamination with E. coli O157:H7 in finished products.

No food can leave the Dixie Dew facility for sale or distribution while the food facility registration is suspended.

On March 28, 2017, the FDA issued a Suspension of Food Facility Registration Order to Dixie Dew of Erlanger, Kentucky, after an inspection revealed insanitary conditions at the firm that could affect the safety of finished products.

The FDA inspected the facility between March 3 and 15, 2017.  On March 3, 2017, Dixie Dew refused to allow FDA investigators access to the facility’s environmental sampling and production records; the FDA subsequently issued a Demand for Records under section 414 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. After receiving the Demand for Records, Dixie Dew provided FDA investigators with the necessary records. At the close of the inspection, the FDA provided Dixie Dew with a list of the investigators’ inspectional observations (Form FDA 483), noting objectionable conditions seen during the inspection. Dixie Dew responded to the report in writing with a list of actions the firm has taken to correct the conditions; however, FDA found the corrective actions were not adequate to fully address the risks that were identified, and issued the Suspension Order to prevent further illnesses from occurring.

The Suspension Order applies to the entire facility. While the order is in effect, no food product may leave the facility for sale or distribution.

Specific problems noted in the suspension order and Form 483 included (blanks reflect redacted information):

– investigators observed grossly insanitary conditions that cause your firm’s soy nut butter products to be adulterated;
– food contact surfaces, floors, walls, and ceilings in the soy nut butter processing and packaging rooms were heavily coated with soy nut butter build-up from previous production runs.
– firm does not routinely wash and sanitize smaller pipes, pipe fittings, gaskets, seals, “or the rubber _____ plug” when broken down following a production run;
– firm does not conduct a kill step for SoyNut Butter product remaining in your firm’s mixing kettle leftover from a production run;
– plant Manager stated, up to _____ may remain in the kettle overnight or weekend prior to resuming production. You and your Plant Manager stated the kettle is shut off when product remains in the kettle overnight and/or over the weekend;
– plant manager and maintenance supervisor reported your _____ machine, used for fine mixing of the SoyNut Butter and ________, routinely shuts off during processing. Your Plant Manager stated this occurs one to two times per day and, this problem has persisted for approximately 15 years despite repeated maintenance intended to correct the problem;
– firm monitors the SoyNut ______ with a ______ thermometer, but plant manager stated he has never verified the accuracy of this instrument;
– you and your plant manager report, your temperature probe and chart recorder, initially engineered to verify and record _____ of product in the large mixing kettle, is not functioning properly and has not been used for well over a year.

FDA inspectors also noted problems with Dixie Dew’s food safety testing program, noting the company’s “failure to perform microbial testing where necessary to identify possible food contamination.” Inspectors found the testing materials on hand at Dixie Dew had expired in July 2016 and October 2015.

Problems in the Dixie Dew quality control lab were described in detail by FDA inspectors.

“An apparent fly infestation in your firm’s Quality Control and Product Development Laboratory was observed on 3/13/2017. Small apparent flies and fly larvae, too numerous to count, were inside an unplugged chest freezer,” according to the 483 report.

“A sealed blue plastic bag was inside the freezer and according to your plant manager, contained an egg product that became rotten when power was disconnected. The small apparent flies were observed along the laboratory counters and flying throughout the laboratory.”

FDA Form 483 (Inspectional Observations) for Dixie Dew Products, Inc.

Suspension of Food Facility Registration Order

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Soy Nut Butter E. coli Outbreak

At least eight people are sick with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli after spending time at the Mesa County Fair, which ran from July 25-29 in Grand Junction.

Mesa County Public Health officials have been working with representatives from the fair and those who became sick to find the source of the illness.

Shiga toxin-producing E. coli is common in cattle, sheep and goats. It can be contracted through direct contact with these animals or contact with things in close proximity to the animals that may have been cross contaminated.

Mesa County Public Health officials have also been in close communication with child-care providers and health-care providers to determine the magnitude of the outbreak, and to prevent further spread of the illness.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Good Food Concepts, LLC., a Colorado Springs, Colo. establishment, is recalling approximately 1,290 pounds of raw intact and non-intact beef because the products may be contaminated with E. coli O26, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The raw intact and non-intact beef items were processed and packaged on Aug. 3 and Aug. 4, 2017. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF Only)]

  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Filet Mignon,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Brisket Flat,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Sirloin Tip,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Ribeye,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Stew Meat,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, New York Strip,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Skirt Steak,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Various weights of individual packages of “CALLICRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate life, Top Sirloin,” with lot code 170731CC.
  • Cases of 14.60-lb of “RANCH FOODS DIRECT GROUND BEEF 80/20 BEEF,” with lot code 170804.
  • Cases of 6.40-lb of “RANCH FOODS DIRECT GROUND BEEF 80/20” BEEF, with lot code 170803.
  • Cases of 6.40-lb of “RANCH FOODS DIRECT PHILLY MEAT BEEF,” with lot code 170803.
  • Cases of 6.40-lb of “RANCH FOODS DIRECT TOP SIRLOIN STEAK 8oz BEEF,” with lot code 170803.
  • Cases of 40-lb of “RANCH FOODS DIRECT GROUND CHUCK BEEF,” with lot code 170804.
  • Cases of 6.40-lb of “RANCH FOODS DIRECT GROUND BEEF (73/27),” with lot code 170803.
  • Cases of 40-lb of “RANCH FOODS DIRECT FLAT IRON BEEF,” with lot code 170804.
  • Cases of “FAMILY BUNDLE, 4-GROUND BEEF 80% LEAN 20% FAT, 1-LONDON BROIL, 2-PKGS CUBE STEAKS, 6-FLATIRON STEAKS, $91.99” with lot code 170804.
  • Cases of “STEAK BUNDLE, 4-RIBEYE STEAKS, 4-NEW YORK STRIP STEAKS, 4-TOP SIRLOIN STEAKS, 4-FILET MIGNON $174.99” with lot code 170804.
  • Cases of “RIBEYE STEAK BUNDLE, 10-RIBEYE STEAKS, $117.99” with lot code 170803.
  • Cases of “COLORADO BUNDLE, 4-SKIRTS STEAKS, 4-CHUCK EYE STEAKS, 4-TOP SIRLOIN, 2-CHUCK ROAST, 15-GROUND BEEF 80% LEAN 20%FAT, $199.19” with lot code 170804.
  • Cases of 20-lb of “GROUND BEED, 90% LEAN, 10% FAT $125.99” with lot code 170804.
  • Packages of “ALL NATURAL CALLIGRATE BEEF, Celebrate goodness, Celebrate Life, GROUND BEEF.”

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 27316” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations, wholesale locations, and restaurants in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

The problem was discovered on Aug. 5, 2017 when plant management at Good Food Concepts, LLC notified FSIS in-plant inspection personnel that they tested a production lot of carcasses they received from the Callicrate Ranch on July 31, 2017. The carcass trimmings from the N60 analysis was positive for non-O157 STEC serogroup O26.

The Comfy Cow is recalling pints of Banana Puddin Y’all, Chocolate Squared2, Cookies and Cream, Cow Trax, Double Fold Vanilla, Georgia Butter Pecan, Intense Dark Chocolate, Salted Caramel, Strawberry Fields Forever due to a potential contamination of E. coli. E. coli bacteria can cause diarrhea and dehydration. Most people who are infected recover, but the bacteria can be deadly.

On 07/19/2017 the firm was notified through internal firm product sample testing that pints of Banana Puddin Y’all, Chocolate Squared2, Cookies and Cream, Cow Trax, Double Fold Vanilla, Georgia Butter Pecan, Intense Dark Chocolate, Salted Caramel, Strawberry Fields Forever were either positive for E. coli or showed high counts of coliform.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

Products affected are:

Product Size UPC Use By Dates
Banana Puddin Y’all PINT – 473 mL 852009005353 04/07/2018
Chocolate Squared2 PINT – 473 mL 852009005261 03/30/2018
Cookies and Cream PINT – 473 mL 852009005049 03/31/2018
Cow Trax PINT – 473 mL 852009005032 04/04/2018
Double Fold Vanilla PINT – 473 mL 852009005315 03/31/2018
Georgia Butter Pecan PINT – 473 mL 852009005285 03/14/2018
Georgia Butter Pecan 3 gal bulk container n/a 03/14/2018
Intense Dark Chocolate PINT – 473 mL 852009005148 03/23/2018
Salted Caramel PINT – 473 mL 852009005216 04/13/2018
Strawberry Field Forever PINT – 473 mL 852009005308 03/21/2018

The products were distributed between 06/13/2017 and 07/21/2017.  These products were packaged in pint containers and sold primarily in retail stores located in the States of: Kentucky, Missouri, Indiana, and Tennessee.

See recalled product – https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm570565.htm#recall-photos

As previously reported, there are E. coli infections that are possibly linked to the Main Beach at Lake Wildwood in Commodore Park. The Nevada County Public Health Department (NCPHD) began receiving reports of sick children last Thursday, July 27th. As of today, NCPHD has received reports of nine young children who are ill, six of whom have been hospitalized, though two of the hospitalized children have been discharged home. Three of the hospitalized children have developed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), which is a potentially life-threatening condition with anemia and kidney complications. Though HUS is a very serious condition, most people who are diagnosed with HUS recover fully. In addition, one adult closely associated with one of the symptomatic children has been diagnosed with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli.

The NCPHD and Nevada County Environmental Health Department continue to work closely on an active investigation of this outbreak. In cooperation with Lake Wildwood Association Management, the Environmental Health Department closed the Commodore Park beach on July 28th in an effort to ensure public health and safety. Preliminary test results from water samples taken near that beach were received on Saturday, July 29th, and the results warranted continued beach closure. (It can take up to 1-2 days to receive these preliminary results.) As an additional precautionary measure, NCPHD sent an advisory to all Lake Wildwood residents recommending no recreational swimming in the lake until additional beach areas were tested. NCPHD emphasized that this advisory was most critical for more vulnerable populations including young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those with weakened immune systems. In addition, Environmental Health Department staff worked with the Lake Wildwood Association to post warnings and the NCPHD advisory at all of the lake’s public beaches. The Lake Wildwood Association Management continues to cooperate and be responsive to multiple county departments in the efforts to prevent further illness.

At the request of the Environmental Health Department, the Department of Public Works collected water samples at Lake Wildwood. Samples were taken from the five public beaches along the lake near the shoreline, as the shoreline at the beach at Commodore Park is where all of the ill children were known to have played. Results from those samples were received late yesterday, August 1st, and three of the five public beaches (Commodore Park, Meadow Park, and Hideaway Park) had elevated levels of fecal coliforms, which are bacteria that can cause serious illness. The Environmental Health Department determined that the results warranted closures of all of the public beaches to mitigate any further health risk.

The Public Works Department tested for leaks in the sewer lines for the Lake Wildwood area by using an inert, non-toxic dye. The dye, green in color, will dissipate with exposure to direct sunlight within 24 hours. Residents may, however, notice waters that are coming out of the plant after treatment will have a rich green color.

Though various tests have been conducted, the source of the contamination has not yet been determined. The investigation continues and the lake water will be tested regularly at seven different locations near the beaches listed above. This testing will occur twice a week at the same seven locations until further notice. The beaches, therefore, will remain closed until further notice and the no swimming advisory remains in effect as well. The public pool remains open and no infections have been linked to the pool at this time.

The symptoms of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea (often bloody), vomiting and sometimes fever. It can take up to ten days after exposure to develop symptoms, and most people recover within five to ten days. “This illness is more dangerous in young children than healthy adults, and should be taken very seriously” said Dr. Ken Cutler, Nevada County Health Officer. “If you or a loved one experience these symptoms, please contact your health care provider right away. If there are complications such as dehydration or anemia, timely treatment can make a significant difference in your recovery.” Moreover, anyone with these symptoms or caring for someone with these symptoms should wash their hands meticulously and frequently and should not prepare food for others. In addition, anyone who has experienced these symptoms should not attend daycare with without clearance from a health care provider.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The investigation of the E. coli outbreak in the Hildale/Colorado City area is drawing to a close. It has been determined that the likely source of the disease was infected animals, followed by person-to-person contact. Several livestock tested positive for the E. coli strain involved in this outbreak. Their owners have been contacted and given guidance to prevent further spread. Tests on water systems, springs, ground beef, produce, and dairy products were negative.There have been no new confirmed cases linked to this outbreak since July 9th, although public health agencies will continue to monitor disease activity in the community.

Disease outbreaks are unpredictable and can occur in any community. This effort has involved the Southwest Utah Public Health Department, Mohave County Department of Public Health, Utah Department of Health, Arizona Department of Health Services, and the CDC. Hundreds of samples were tested and many people were interviewed.

We appreciate the cooperation of the people of Hildale, Colorado City, and Centennial Park with the investigation and their efforts to protect against future outbreaks.

As a reminder, E. coli are common bacteria which can be spread to people when tiny pieces of feces enter the mouth through unwashed hands; contaminated soil, water, and food. Undercooked ground beef and unpasteurized dairy products are especially high risk. Infected animals and manure are also sources of infection. Most types of E. coli are harmless, but some strains are harmful to humans, such as the strain found in this outbreak (E. coli O157:H7).

Health officials continue to encourage following the practices listed below to help prevent infection from E. coli and other diseases:
• Keep sick animals separated from people and consider consulting a veterinarian
• Wash your hands with warm, soapy water
• After contact with animals or exposure to animal feces
• Before and after preparing or eating food
• After using the bathroom and changing diapers
• Before touching anything that enters an infant’s mouth
• Wash produce thoroughly
• Keep raw food separate from cooked food
• Carefully clean all surfaces and objects that have touched raw meat
• Cook meats thoroughly. Ground beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees (use a meat thermometer)