To date, Marler Clark has filed six lawsuits in relation to the nationwide E. coli O157:H7 outbreak: one in New Jersey against Panera, one in Pennsylvania against Freshway, two in Arizona against Red Lobster, one in California against Papa Murphy’s, and one in Georgia against Texas Roadhouse. Marler Clark currently represents 86 people sickened in the outbreak, including 11 who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), acute kidney failure.

As of May 15 2018, there are 172 cases in 32 states: Alaska (8), Arizona (8), California (39), Colorado (3), Connecticut (2), Florida (1), Georgia (4), Idaho (11), Illinois (2), Iowa (1), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Michigan (5), Minnesota (12), Mississippi (1), Missouri (1), Montana (8), Nebraska (1), New Jersey (8), New York (5), North Dakota (2), Ohio (6), Oregon (1), Pennsylvania (21), South Dakota (1), Tennessee (3), Texas (1), Utah (1), Virginia (1), Washington (7), and Wisconsin (3).

Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29. Sixty-five percent of ill people are female. Of 157 people with information available, 75 (48%) have been hospitalized, including 20 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. One death was reported from California.

The last shipments of romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region were harvested on April 16, 2018, and the harvest season is over. It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region is still available in people’s homes, stores, or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life. The most recent illnesses reported to CDC started when romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region was likely still available in stores, restaurants, and in peoples’ homes.

As of May 9, 2018, there are six Canadian cases of E. coli O157 that are genetically similar to the U.S. outbreak linked to romaine lettuce coming from the Yuma growing region in the U.S. The six Canadian illnesses are reported in four provinces: British Columbia (1), Alberta (1), Saskatchewan (2), and Ontario (2). Individuals became sick between late March and mid-April 2018. One of the Canadian cases was hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported in Canada. Individuals who became ill were between 13 and 68 years of age. The majority of cases (67%) were female.

In the Canadian investigation, among the six cases, most of the individuals who became sick reported having eaten romaine lettuce at home, or in prepared salads purchased at grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains, before their illnesses occurred. Two Canadians did report traveling to the U.S. before getting sick and eating romaine lettuce while they were there.

If it is determined that contaminated romaine lettuce is in the Canadian market, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will take the necessary steps to protect the public, including recalling the product as required. Currently there are no Food Recall Warnings associated with this outbreak.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner,Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

ATLANTA, Georgia – A 6th lawsuit was filed today in the Northern District Court of Atlanta, Georgia on behalf of William Lopresti as a parent of his two daugters who were infected with E. coli O157:H7 from romaine lettuce. The lawsuit was filed against Texas Roadhouse, Inc. by Marler Clark, the food safety law firm and Moraitakis and Kushel, LLP, a local Atlanta firm.

On April 8, 2018, Mr. Lopresti’s daughters consumed romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Arizona region while eating a side salad served at a Texas Roadhouse restaurant located at 2475 Barrett Creek Pkwy in Marietta, Georgia. Two days later they both began to experience symptoms of fever, abdominal cramps, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. On April 13, Mr. Lopresti took his daughter “E.L.” to the emergency room, where she was admitted to the hospital for ongoing treatment. E.L. was released 5 days later but continues to recover as of the date of the complaint.

“Our goal in filing lawsuits against the place of purchase of the contaminated romaine is to force the disclosure of where in the chain of distribution – grower, shipper or processor – the E. coli contamination occurred,” said William Marler, managing partner of Marler Clark.  “Only when we find out where the contamination occurred can we do something to prevent the next outbreak,” added Marler.

To date, Marler Clark has filed six complaints in relation to the nationwide E. coli O157:H7 outbreak including this complaint against Texas Roadhouse, along with one in New Jersey against Panera, one in Pennsylvania against Fareway, two in Arizona against Red Lobster, and one in California against Papa Murphy’s. Marler Clark currently represents 86 people sickened in the outbreak, including 11 who developed acute kidney failure.

According to the CDC, as of May 15, 2018, 172 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 32 states.  Alaska (8), Arizona (8), California (39), Colorado (3), Connecticut (2), Florida (1), Georgia (4), Idaho (11), Illinois (2), Iowa (1), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Michigan (5), Minnesota (12), Mississippi (1), Missouri (1), Montana (8), Nebraska (1), New Jersey (8), New York (5), North Dakota (2), Ohio (6), Oregon (1), Pennsylvania (21), South Dakota (1), Tennessee (3), Texas (1), Utah (1), Virginia (1), Washington (7), and Wisconsin (3). One death was reported from California.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 13, 2018 to May 2, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29. Sixty-five percent of ill people are female. Of 157 people with information available, 75 (48%) have been hospitalized, including 20 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner,Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

According to the CDC, as of May 15, 2018, 172 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 32 states.  Alaska (8), Arizona (8), California (39), Colorado (3), Connecticut (2), Florida (1), Georgia (4), Idaho (11), Illinois (2), Iowa (1), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Michigan (5), Minnesota (12), Mississippi (1), Missouri (1), Montana (8), Nebraska (1), New Jersey (8), New York (5), North Dakota (2), Ohio (6), Oregon (1), Pennsylvania (21), South Dakota (1), Tennessee (3), Texas (1), Utah (1), Virginia (1), Washington (7), and Wisconsin (3).

Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 13, 2018 to May 2, 2018.

Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29. Sixty-five percent of ill people are female. Of 157 people with information available, 75 (48%) have been hospitalized, including 20 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure.

One death was reported from California.

Illnesses that occurred after April 21, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of two to three weeks.

According to the FDA, the last shipments of romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region were harvested on April 16, 2018, and the harvest season is over. It is unlikely that any romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region is still available in people’s homes, stores, or restaurants due to its 21-day shelf life. The most recent illnesses reported to CDC started when romaine lettuce from the Yuma growing region was likely still available in stores, restaurants, and in peoples’ homes.

The FDA has identified Harrison Farms of Yuma, Arizona, as the grower and sole source of the whole-head romaine lettuce that sickened several people in an Alaskan correctional facility, but has not determined where in the supply chain the contamination occurred.

The traceback investigation indicates that the illnesses associated with this outbreak cannot be explained by a single grower, harvester, processor, or distributor. While traceback continues, the FDA will focus on trying to identify factors that contributed to contamination of romaine across multiple supply chains.  The agency is examining all possibilities, including that contamination may have occurred at any point along the growing, harvesting, packaging, and distribution chain before reaching consumers.

As I said to Time yesterday:

William Marler, a Seattle-based attorney who specializes in food safety, is representing Fitzgerald and her son, as well as 86 other people who have been sickened in the current outbreak. He has six cases open at the moment, against establishments in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Arizona and California, including Panera Bread and Red Lobster. The goal, he says, is to work backward by suing restaurants that have sold tainted products, in hopes of learning who supplied the lettuce to these eateries. Marler says this strategy has brought him to Freshway, a supplier serving the Midwest and East Coast, and ideally will lead him to the as-yet-unidentified farm or farms in Yuma, Ariz., that are responsible for the outbreak.

“I’m the Mueller of the E. coli outbreak,” Marler says. “It’s a process not dissimilar to a prosecuting attorney working their way toward the Oval Office.”

The CDC updated the outbreak numbers of those confirmed E. coli around the United States, adding 6 from California, 1 from Florida, 1 from Georgia, 1 from Illinois, 1 from Massachusetts, 10 from Missouri, 1 from New Jersey, 2 from New York, 2 from North Dakota, 1 from Texas, 1 from Washington, and 1 from Wisconsin. To date, there are 149 confirmed cases, 17 with HUS, and 1 death.  There are a reported six illnesses in Canada.

Marler Clark currently represents 64 individuals affected by the outbreak, 10 of whom developed HUS.

Marler Clark filed the first lawsuit as a result of the outbreak against Freshway Inc. the supplier for Panera Bread in New Jersey. Marler Clark has filed three additional lawsuits, one in Pennsylvania against Freshway and two in Arizona against Red Lobster.  A additional lawsuit will be filed in Federal Court in California on Friday against Papa Murphys.

“I am hoping through the litigation to track the E. coil contamination to its source in Yuma. If we can find the source and the cause, we may well be able to prevent a similar outbreak in the future,” said Bill Marler, managing partner at Marler Clark.

Bill Marler has been at the VTEC conference this past week in Florence, Italy with the top representatives of the CDC, FDA, and world experts on E. coli. Bill was a keynote speaker at the conference, outlining his 25 years of E. coli litigation experience.  Bill is presently in South Africa consulting on a 1,000 person Listeria outbreak.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

There are 149 cases in 29 states: Alaska (8), Arizona (8), California (30), Colorado (2), Connecticut (2), Florida (1), Georgia (5), Idaho (11), Illinois (2), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Michigan (4), Minnesota (10), Mississippi (1), Missouri (1), Montana (8), New Jersey (8), New York (4), North Dakota (2), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (20), South Dakota (1), Tennessee (1), Texas (1), Utah (1), Virginia (1), Washington (7), and Wisconsin (2). Six are reported ill in Canada

Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 13 to April 25, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 30. Sixty-five percent of ill people are female. Of 129 people with information available, 64 (50%) have been hospitalized, including 17 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. One death was reported from California.

Illnesses that occurred after April 17, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the illness is reported.

According to the FDA, it received confirmation from the Arizona Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement administered by the Arizona Department of Agriculture that romaine lettuce is no longer being produced and distributed from the Yuma growing region, reducing the potential for exposure to contaminated product. However, due to the 21-day shelf life, the FDA cannot be certain that romaine lettuce from this region is no longer in the supply chain.

So, why no recall?

Marler Clark currently represents 64 individuals affected by the outbreak, 10 of whom developed HUS. Marler Clark filed the first lawsuit as a result of the outbreak against Freshway INC. the supplier for Panera Bread in New Jersey. Marler Clark has filed two additional lawsuits, one in Pennsylvania against Freshway and a third in Arizonaagainst Red Lobster.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

At least 132 sick from 27 states.

At least 55 hospitalized.

At least 16 with HUS.

1 death has been reported.

Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29.

At least 63% are female.

As of May 2, the CDC reported 121 cases from 25 states, Alaska (8), Arizona (8), California (24), Colorado (2), Connecticut (2), Georgia (4), Idaho (11), Illinois (1), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (2), Michigan (4), Mississippi (1), Missouri (1), Montana (8), New Jersey (7), New York (2), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (20), South Dakota (1), Tennessee (1), Utah (1), Virginia (1), Washington (6), and Wisconsin (1), not including the case from North Dakota, which will be added to the outbreak summary in the next update.

In addition, the North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH) (Team Diarrhea) reports North Dakota’s first case of E. coli infection associated with romaine lettuce originating from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. The NDDoH has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other state and local health officials in this national investigation. A second case in ND possibly associated with the outbreak is still under investigation.

In addition, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH)is working with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and public health agencies in other states to investigate an outbreak of E. coli O157 infections associated with eating romaine lettuce.

Information on the national outbreak can be found on CDC’s and FDA’s websites: CDC: E. coli and FDA Investigating Multistate Outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 Infections Likely Linked to Romaine Lettuce from Yuma Growing Region.

Ten cases of E. coli O157 infection in Minnesota residents have recently been identified and linked to the multi-state outbreak. Illness onset dates range from April 20 through May 2. The cases are from both metro and greater Minnesota counties; 90 percent are female. Three cases were hospitalized, and two developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially fatal complication that can include kidney failure and other severe problems.

All of the Minnesota cases interviewed by public health investigators reported exposure to romaine lettuce. Reported exposure locations include restaurants, grocery stores, and residential facilities. MDH is working with MDA to further investigate these exposures.

“Do not eat, buy, or sell romaine lettuce unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma growing region,” said Kirk Smith, manager of the Foodborne, Waterborne, Vectorborne, and Zoonotic Diseases section. “The Yuma growing region includes part of western Arizona and extends into the Imperial Valley of southeastern California but does not include Salinas Valley or other growing regions in California.” Product from the Yuma growing region should no longer be on sale; however, individuals should check their refrigerators for romaine lettuce that may have been grown in the Yuma region.

Symptoms of illness caused by E. coli O157 typically include stomach cramps and diarrhea, often with bloody stools, but only a low-grade or no fever. People typically become ill two to five days after exposure, but this period can range from one to eight days. Most people recover in five to 10 days. However, E. coli O157 infections sometimes lead to HUS. Those most at risk of developing complications from E. coli O157 include children younger than 10, the elderly, and those with weakened immune systems.

Diarrhea associated with E. coli O157 infections should not be treated with antibiotics, as this practice might promote the development of HUS. Anyone who believes they may have developed an E. coli O157 infection should contact their health care provider.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clarkhave represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smithand Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coliinfection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

122 sick from 26 states.

At least 52 hospitalized.

At least 14 with HUS.

1 death has been reported.

Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29.

63% are female.

The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH) reports North Dakota’s first case of E. coli infection associated with romaine lettuce originating from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. The NDDoH has been working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other state and local health officials in this national investigation. A second case in ND possibly associated with the outbreak is still under investigation.

“The FDA has stated they cannot be certain that romaine lettuce from the Yuma region is no longer in the supply chain due to the 21-day shelf life,” said Laura Cronquist, epidemiologist with the NDDoH. “Food service establishments and retailers should not sell or serve any romaine lettuce, including chopped, whole heads or hearts, that originate from Yuma, Arizona. Consumers should not eat or buy romaine lettuce unless they can confirm it is not from the Yuma growing region.”

As of May 2, 121 cases from 25 states have been reported to the CDC, not including the case from North Dakota, which will be added to the outbreak summary in the next update. Fifty-two cases have been hospitalized and there has been one death. Cases range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29.  At least 52 people have been hospitalized with 14 with HUS.  There has been one death.

The most common symptoms of E. coli include diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms typically begin three to four days after exposure to the bacteria, but can take as long as 10 days. Treatment with antibiotics is not recommended. Most cases resolve on their own, but severe cases and cases involving complications may require hospitalization. The CDC estimates that around 5-10 percent of people with E. coli infections develop a complication known as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which affects the red blood cells and can cause kidney failure. Although anyone can develop HUS, this complication is more likely to occur in younger children, older adults, and those with impaired immune systems or other underlying health conditions. Indications that a person may be developing HUS include, decreased frequency of urination, feeling very tired, and loss of pink color in cheeks and inside the lower eyelids.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

As of May 1, 2018, 121 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 25 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 13, 2018 to April 21, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29. 63 percent of ill people are female. Of 102 people with information available, 52 (51percent) have been hospitalized, including 14 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. 1 death was reported from California.

State / Ill People
Alaska / 8
Arizona / 8
California / 24
Colorado / 2
Connecticut / 2
Georgia / 4
Idaho / 11
Illinois / 1
Kentucky / 1
Louisiana / 1
Massachusetts / 2
Michigan / 4
Mississippi / 1
Missouri / 1
Montana / 8
New Jersey / 7
New York / 2
Ohio / 3
Pennsylvania / 20
South Dakota / 1
Tennessee / 1
Utah / 1
Virginia / 1
Washington / 6
Wisconsin / 1
Total / 121

Illnesses that occurred after April 11, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 3 weeks.

The CDC reports as of May 1, 2018, 121 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 25 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page. Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 13, 2018 to April 21, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29. Sixty-three percent of ill people are female. Of 102 people with information available, 52 (51%) have been hospitalized, including 14 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. One death was reported from California.

Illnesses that occurred after April 11, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of two to three weeks.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation

The FDA has identified Harrison Farm as the grower of the romaine lettuce responsible for the E. coli O157:H7 cluster linked to ill prisoners in Alaska. The CDC has also confirmed that the E. coli O157:H7 found in the 8 prisoners is a genetic match to the other 90 ill in the other 21 states: Alaska (8), Arizona (5), California (16), Colorado (2), Connecticut (2), Georgia (1), Idaho (10), Illinois (1), Louisiana (1), Michigan (3), Mississippi (1), Missouri (1), Montana (8), New Jersey (7), New York (2), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (18), South Dakota (1), Tennessee (1), Virginia (1), Washington (5), and Wisconsin (1). However, the FDA and CDC are not linking Harrison Farm to the broader outbreak at this time.

The CDC and FDA are continuing to advise consumers to avoid all romaine grown in Yuma, Arizona. The FDA is waiting on more testing that could potentially link Harrison Farms or additional growers in Yuma, Arizona. An original cluster in New Jersey linked to Panera Bread Restaurants alerted health officials to the outbreak.

The CDC updated the case count to 98 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7. Of the 98 people sickened, 46 have been hospitalized (53%). This is about 20% higher than the normal hospitalization rate. According to the FDA, this outbreak is more severe because of the type of Shiga toxin produced by this strain: STX2 only.

“This is a shockingly large percentage of hospitalized and HUS cases.  It underscores the need for the produce industry to do a better job of traceability so these outbreaks are identified and stopped as soon as possible,” said Bill Marler, managing partner of Marler Clark.

STX binds to the lining of blood vessels in certain organs and can destroy the lining, the STX2 strain binds better than other strains making it particularly dangerous. This is the largest multi-state outbreak since the 2006 Dole spinach E. coli outbreak which sickened over 200 people. That outbreak was also a STX2 strain outbreak.

To date, Marler Clark, the food safety law firm, has been contacted by over 50 people, 7 of whom have contracted HUS. The individuals are from Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin. During the 2006 Dole spinach outbreak, Marler Clark represented 93 of the individuals who were sickened.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products. The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smithand Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.