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Foodborne Illness Outbreaks

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Marler Files 4 E. coli Lawsuits against I.M. Health and Dixie Dew: Illnesses in Arizona, California, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Oregon, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin

Marler Clark has filed 4 E. coli Lawsuits against I.M. Healthy and Dixie Dew.  Marler Clark represents 14 of the 23 sickened.

The filings are: Leavitt-Garcia – First Amended Complaint, Simmons – First Amended Complaint, Stuller. Complaint (filed) and Vanderby – First Amended Complaint.

big-map-3-17-17-640x412The CDC this week updated the E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to I.M. Healthy and Dixie Dew Soy Nut Butter to twenty-three people infected with the outbreak strains of E. coli O157:H7 from nine states. Arizona 4, California 5, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 6, Virginia 2,  Washington 2, Wisconsin 1.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2017, to March 5, 2017. Ill people range in age from 1 to 48 years, with a median age of 8. Twenty (87%) of the 23 ill people are younger than 18 years. Among ill people, 61% are male. Ten ill people have been hospitalized and seven people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. Illnesses that occurred after February 24, 2017, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported.

In interviews, ill people or their family members answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Twenty (87%) of the 23 people reached for interview reported either eating I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter at home (14 people) in the week before they became ill, attending a facility that served I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter (2 people), or attending childcare centers that served I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter and I.M. Healthy brand granola coated with SoyNut Butter (4 people). SoyNut Butter is a nut-free substitute for peanut butter. Investigators have reported to CDC two more ill people who either developed HUS or had test showing they were infected with the E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.

Laboratory testing identified E. coli O157:H7 in opened containers of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter collected from the homes of ill people in California, Oregon, and Washington. Officials in California also isolated E. coli O157:H7 in unopened containers of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter collected from retail locations. Further testing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that the E. coli O157:H7 in all of these containers of SoyNut Butter had the same DNA fingerprints as the E. coli O157:H7 isolates from ill people.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

I.M. Healthy and Dixie Drew Soy Nut Butter E. coli Outbreak Update – Toll 23

big-map-3-17-17The CDC this morning updated the E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to I.M. Healthy and Dixie Dew Soy Nut Butter to twenty-three people infected with the outbreak strains of E. coli O157:H7 from nine states. Arizona 4, California 5, Maryland 1, Missouri 1, New Jersey 1, Oregon 6, Virginia 2,  Washington 2, Wisconsin 1.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2017, to March 5, 2017. Ill people range in age from 1 to 48 years, with a median age of 8. Twenty (87%) of the 23 ill people are younger than 18 years. Among ill people, 61% are male. Ten ill people have been hospitalized and seven people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported. Illnesses that occurred after February 24, 2017, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported.

In interviews, ill people or their family members answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Twenty (87%) of the 23 people reached for interview reported either eating I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter at home (14 people) in the week before they became ill, attending a facility that served I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter (2 people), or attending childcare centers that served I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter and I.M. Healthy brand granola coated with SoyNut Butter (4 people). SoyNut Butter is a nut-free substitute for peanut butter. Investigators have reported to CDC two more ill people who either developed HUS or had test showing they were infected with the E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.

Laboratory testing identified E. coli O157:H7 in opened containers of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter collected from the homes of ill people in California, Oregon, and Washington. Officials in California also isolated E. coli O157:H7 in unopened containers of I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter collected from retail locations. Further testing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that the E. coli O157:H7 in all of these containers of SoyNut Butter had the same DNA fingerprints as the E. coli O157:H7 isolates from ill people.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Marler Clark Files 4th Lawsuit Against SoyNut Butter Company and Dixie Dew Products over Nationwide E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak

Plaintiffs in most recent complaint are parents of minor child who developed Hemolytic uremic syndrome, a life-threatening complication of E. coli infection

A lawsuit has been filed on behalf of the Seattle-area parents of a young child who was sickened after eating E. coli O157:H7 contaminated product sold by The SoyNut Butter Company of Illinois. This is the fourth lawsuit filed connected to the SoyNut Butter outbreak, but the first to directly name the product’s manufacturer: Dixie Dew Products of Erlanger, Kentucky. Up until recently, neither the FDA nor SoyNut Butter Company would not disclose the name of the product’s manufacturer. The family is being represented by Newland & Newland, LLP as well as Seattle-based food safety law firm Marler Clark, LLP, PS. The case number is 1:17-cv-02138.

The lawsuit’s plaintiffs are Travis and Morgan Stuller, who are parents to a child identified as L.S. in the complaint. In the days leading up to L.S.’s illness, she regularly consumed SoyNut Butter manufactured and sold by Dixie Dew Products and SoyNut Butter Company, respectively.

On or about February 21, 2017, L.S. developed painful gastrointestinal symptoms, which worsened to include grossly bloody diarrhea. She was seen by her treating physician for ongoing symptoms, but, on March 5, was hospitalized at Seattle Children’s Hospital and remained so until March 8. While in the hospital, an illness of E. coli O157:H7 was confirmed and she was treated for hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially life-threatening condition.

L.S. continues to recover at home, but faces uncertain future medical complications.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 16 people from nine states have so far been confirmed as infected with the strain of E. coli O157:H7 connected to the SoyNut Butter outbreak. Like L.S., 14 of the 16 ill people in this outbreak are under the age of 18 and eight have required hospitalization. The affected states include includes Arizona (4), California (4), Maryland (1), Missouri (1), New Jersey (1), Oregon (2), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (1).  That number is expected to increase in the coming days.

While The SoyNut Butter Company has issued a voluntary recall of affected products, the FDA and CDC, along with state and local health officials, continue to investigate the outbreak. The recall includes I.M. Healthy Original Creamy SoyNut Butter with a Best By date of 08-30-18 or 08-31-18 as well as Granola and Dixie Diner’s Club Brand Carb Not Beanit Butter.

“The scope of this outbreak is much larger than originally believed, affecting a number of brand names. Early on, SoyNut Butter Company was allowed to not disclose the name of the original manufacturer,” said Bill Marler of Marler Clark, LLP. “This calls into question the integrity of not only the products sold by SoyNut Butter Company, but all of those manufactured by Dixie Dew Products. Are there other related products on the shelf right now that could make people sick?”

An estimated 73,000 cases of E. coli O157:H7 occur each year in the United States. Approximately 2,000 people are hospitalized, and 60 people die as a direct result of E. coli O157:H7 infections and complications, including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and kidney failure. Symptoms of E. coli include the sudden onset of abdominal pain and severe cramps, followed by watery, sometimes bloody, diarrhea. Vomiting can also occur, but there is usually no fever.

A severe, life-threatening complication of E. coli O157:H7 is Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although most people recover from this infection, about 5-10% of infected individuals goes on to develop HUS. E. coli O157:H7 is responsible for over 90% of the cases of HUS that develop in North America. To learn more about HUS, please visit http://www.about-hus.com.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

Lead in Thyme?

UCM547268-420x600Aroma Imports Inc. of Dearborn Heights, MI, is recalling 450 g and 4.5 kg packages of Nabelsi brand Thyme because the products have the potential to contain excessive levels of lead.  The recall was initiated after it was discovered that product contained high levels of lead (422 PPM) based on sampling by U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Illinois Department of Public Health, Environmental Health Protection.  Based on the product’s 30 g serving size, the calculated lead result is 12,660 µg per serving.  This level exceeds the daily limit guidelines of 6 µg per day for children, the 25 µg per day for pregnant women, and the 75 µg per day for other adults.

The recalled Nabelsi Thyme was distributed from Nov. 7, 2016 until Feb. 22, 2017 to retailers, food service establishments, and wholesalers in Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, New Jersey and Virginia.

The 450 g size (UPC: 4670000205314) is packaged in a mostly green foil/mylar bag that is not transparent on either side. The 4.5 kg size (UPC: 6670000205374) packaging is a silver foil/mylar bag. The production date for both sizes is 08/20/2016 and the expiration date is 08/20/2018. The production and expiration dates can be found on the back lower left corner of the 450 g package and back lower right of the 4.5 kg package.  The 450 g packages are packed 24 per case and the 4.5 kg packages are packed 2 per case.

Lead can accumulate in the body over time and too much of it can cause serious and sometimes permanent adverse health consequences.  People with high blood levels of lead may show no symptoms, but the condition may cause damage to the nervous system and internal organs. Acute lead poisoning may cause a wide range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, muscle weakness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, and bloody or decreased urinary output. Children are particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning. Lead poisoning can be diagnosed through clinical testing.

There have been two cases of high blood levels of lead associated with this product to date. Both cases have been reported through the Illinois Department of Public Health, Environmental Health Protection.

Consumers who have purchased any packages Nabelsi Thyme should not consume the product.

Marler Clark Files 3rd Soy Nut Butter Lawsuit against I.M. Healthy over E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak

38112184The SoyNut Butter Company and FDA have yet to disclose who manufactured the E. coli-tainted Soy Nut Butter

A third lawsuit has been filed against The SoyNut Butter Company of Illinois over an ongoing outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 connected to the company’s SoyNut Butter products.  As in the first two lawsuits, “John Doe Manufacturer” has been named in an effort to force the disclosure of the actual manufacturer of the tainted soy nut butter.  The newest plaintiffs are Kelli and Derek Vanderby, a husband and wife who are residents of Sonoma County, California. The couple are being represented by Marler Clark LLP, the Food Safety Law Firm, headquartered in Seattle, and Newland & Newland, LLP, based in Illinois. The case number is 1:17-cv-02055.

After Kelli and Derek purchased I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter, Kelli consumed it regularly in the days before her illness developed. Unbeknownst to the Vanderbys, the product Kelli was eating was tainted with E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.

On or about January 20th, 2017, Kelli developed severe and painful gastrointestinal symptoms, which became worse over the following several days, eventually including bloody diarrhea. On the 23rd of January, she was admitted to Petaluma Valley Hospital in Petaluma, where she was diagnosed with an E. coli O157:H7 infection.  She remained hospitalized until January 27th, 2017.  While she is now out of the hospital, Kelli’s recovering is ongoing as she faces uncertain future medical complications.

The third lawsuit related to the SoyNut Butter Company E. coli outbreak, the Vanderby’s complaint follows two other families who filed suit last week. Mosby and Erin Simmons of Santa Clara County filed on behalf of their young child who was sickened by the company’s I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter. Lisa Leavitt-Garcia and Rolando Garcia, also from Santa Clara County, filed after I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter infected Lisa Leavitt-Garcia with E. coli O157:H7.

“We are very concerned that The SoyNut Butter Company and FDA have yet to disclose the original manufacturer of this product,” said Bill Marler of Marler Clark, LLP.  “Consumers must be able to rely on the integrity of the products they purchase. If this is happening with one company, it could be happening with other products by this unknown manufacturer.”

While The SoyNut Butter Company has issued a voluntary recall of affected products, the FDA and CDC, along with state and local health officials, continue to investigate the outbreak. The recall includes I.M. Healthy Original Creamy SoyNut Butter with a Best By date of 08-30-18 or 08-31-18 as well as Granola and Dixie Diner’s Club Brand Carb Not Beanit Butter.

According to the CDC, as of March 7, 2017, a total of 16 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 were reported from nine states. The number of those sickened continues to increase in this ongoing outbreak.

The number of ill people identified in state includes Arizona (4), California (4), Maryland (1), Missouri (1), New Jersey (1), Oregon (2), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (1). Eight of those sickened have been hospitalized and five have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially life-threatening type of kidney failure. Fourteen of the 16 illnesses were reported in children under the age of 18. No deaths have been reported.

An estimated 73,000 cases of E. coli O157:H7 occur each year in the United States. Approximately 2,000 people are hospitalized, and 60 people die as a direct result of E. coli O157:H7 infections and complications, including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and kidney failure. Symptoms of E. coli include the sudden onset of abdominal pain and severe cramps, followed by watery, sometimes bloody, diarrhea. Vomiting can also occur, but there is usually no fever.

A severe, life-threatening complication of E. coli O157:H7 is Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although most people recover from this infection, about 5-10% of infected individuals goes on to develop HUS. E. coli O157:H7 is responsible for over 90% of the cases of HUS that develop in North America. To learn more about HUS, please visit http://www.about-hus.com.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

Oregon has at least nine with E. coli O157:H7

hdlogocolor_150The Multnomah County Health Department today said seven people have now been sickened by Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli) at Montessori of Alameda school in Portland. Six are children and one is an adult. All of the cases have occurred in one classroom.

Four of the people are confirmed to have  E. coli, O157:H7 and  two of these cases genetically match the E. coli strain from the national I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter outbreak. Three additional people are known to have shiga-toxin producing E. coli and further test results are pending. The Health Department has been investigating diarrhea illnesses at the school since March 7, 2017.

I.M. Healthy Soy Nut Butter and I.M. Healthy granola was recalled nationwide on March 4, 2017 after 16 other people became ill in nine states, including Oregon.  The Health Department is investigating how the SoyNut Butter E. coli strain was introduced into Montessori of Alameda.

“We are working closely with families, staff, and school administrators to stop the spread of this infection and understand how this outbreak happened,” said Dr. Jennifer Vines, Multnomah County Deptuty Health Officer. She added that if people have the recalled product still in their home, they should immediately throw it out or return it to the store where it was purchased.

oregon_npnThe Oregon Health Authority has verified that two confirmed cases of E. coli O157 infection are part of a national outbreak linked to a brand of soynut butter, and epidemiologists are advising consumers to discard the product immediately.

A total of 16 cases in nine states have been identified as part of the outbreak, which Oregon and the other states have been investigating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fourteen (88 percent) of these cases were under the age of 18; five (33 percent) cases resulted in HUS, a type of kidney failure and potentially life-threatening complication. In addition to the two Oregon cases, there were four in Arizona; four in California; and one each in Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. The illnesses are associated with consumption of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter and I.M. Granola, made by SoyNut Butter Co. of Glenview, Ill.

“People need to know that if they have this product in their pantries, they should immediately return it to the store where they bought it, or throw it out,” said Paul Cieslak, MD, medical director for the Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention Section at the OHA Public Health Division. “If they ate the product and are experiencing symptoms of E. coli infection, they should see their health care provider right away.”

Oregon – At least 8 with E. coli likely linked to I.M Healthy Soy Nut Butter

Lynne Terry reports that the E. coli O157:H7 outbreak at the Montessori of Alameda school has grown, with six people sick.

According to Lynne’s reporting, the Multnomah County Health officials said they were part of a nationwide outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 linked to a soy nut butter. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said earlier this month that nine states were affected with 16 sick, including two in Oregon. Now it appears Oregon has eight cases, the most of any state. Two of them were siblings in Clackamas County. The latest six are linked to Montessori of Alameda in Northeast Portland.

Oregon health officials confirmed all six cases on Tuesday. Lab tests are still ongoing on four. Results show that two of the six were infected by the same genetic strain of E. coli O157:H7 that was found in the soy nut butter.

The school did not serve I.M Healthy soy nut butter though Tammy Kennedy, who owns the school, told The Oregonian/OregonLive that one family had it at home.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Vulto Cheese Recall Expands

In response to Vulto Creamery’s expanded recall of raw milk cheeses, Whole Foods Market is voluntarily expanding its recall to include Andes, Hamden and Walton Umber cheeses sold in eight stores in Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York. The cheeses have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, pregnant women and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths and fetal infection among pregnant women.

As of March 10, 2017 Vulto Creamery is reporting the particular strain of Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for 6 illnesses and 2 deaths; however, Whole Foods Market has not received any reports of illnesses or injuries from consumers who purchased the raw cheeses from their stores.

This recall expansion includes Vulto Creamery Andes, Hamden and Walton Umber raw milk cheeses which were cut and packaged in clear plastic wrap with scale labels beginning with PLU codes 0200307, 0201357 or 0206308 and “sell by” dates from 01/02/2017 to 04/02/2017.

These products were sold at the following Whole Foods Market stores:

  • 94 Derby Street, Hingham, MA
  • 1255 Raritan Road Unit 150, Clark, NJ
  • 300 Bergen Town Center, Paramus, NJ
  • 238 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY
  • 1095 Avenue of the Americas. New York, NY
  • 270 Greenwich Street, New York, NY
  • 4 Union Square South, New York, NY
  • 575 Boston Post Road, Port Chester, NY

Initial Press Release

Marler Clark Files Second Lawsuit over E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak

Attorney Marler Demands that The SoyNut Butter Company and FDA disclose who manufactured the E. coli-tainted Soy Nut Butter

A second lawsuit has been filed against The SoyNut Butter Company of Illinois over an ongoing outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 connected to the company’s SoyNut Butter products. In addition, “John Doe Manufactuer” has been name in an effort to force the disclosure of the actual manufactuer.  The newest plaintiffs are Lisa Leavitt-Garcia and Rolando Garcia, a husband and wife who are residents of Santa Clara County. The couple are being represented by Marler Clark LLP, the Food Safety Law Firm, headquartered in Seattle and Newland & Newland, LLP, based in Illinois. The case number is 1:17-cv-01932.

Lisa and Rolando purchased I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter at Target and Lisa consumed it regularly in the days preceding her E. coli O157:H7 illness.

On or about February 21, 2017, Lisa developed severe and worsening abdominal symptoms. After several visits to doctors on February 23 and 24, Lisa was admitted to Good Samaritan Hospital in San Jose where she remained hospitalized until February 28. While in the hospital, she received a diagnosis of E. coli O157:H7 infection.  While she is now out of the hospital, Lisa continue to recover from her infection and faces uncertain future medical complications.

This most recent lawsuit against The SoyNut Butter Company comes on the heels of an action filed last week by Mosby and Erin Simmons, also of Santa Clara County, on behalf of their young child who was sickened by the company’s I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter.

“What makes an outbreak like this particularly scary is this is a product that has a long shelf life and is very likely to be enjoyed by children, who are particularly susceptible to the worst side effects of an E. coli O157:H7 infection,” said Bill Marler of Marler Clark, LLP.  “The SoyNut Butter Company has admitted that it did not make the Soy Nut Butter implicated in this outbreak, but it and the FDA have not disclosed who did.  The pulic has a right to know this information,” added Marler.

While the SoyNut Butter Company has issued a voluntary recall of affected products, the FDA and CDC, along with state and local health officials, continue to investigate the outbreak. The recall includes I.M. Healthy Original Creamy SoyNut Butter with a Best By date of 08-30-18 or 08-31-18 as well as Granola and Dixie Diner’s Club Brand Carb Not Beanit Butter.

According to the CDC, as of March 7, 2017, a total of 16 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 were reported from nine states. The number of those sickened continues to increase in this ongoing outbreak.

The number of ill people identified in state includes Arizona (4), California (4), Maryland (1), Missouri (1), New Jersey (1), Oregon (2), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (1). Eight of those sickened have been hospitalized and five have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially life-threatening type of kidney failure. Fourteen of the 16 illnesses were reported in children under the age of 18. No deaths have been reported.

An estimated 73,000 cases of E. coli O157:H7 occur each year in the United States. Approximately 2,000 people are hospitalized, and 60 people die as a direct result of E. coli O157:H7 infections and complications, including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and kidney failure. Symptoms of E. coli include the sudden onset of abdominal pain and severe cramps, followed by watery, sometimes bloody, diarrhea. Vomiting can also occur, but there is usually no fever.

A severe, life-threatening complication of E. coli O157:H7 is Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although most people recover from this infection, about 5-10% of infected individuals goes on to develop HUS. E. coli O157:H7 is responsible for over 90% of the cases of HUS that develop in North America.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

E. coli Outbreak in Arizona, California, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Oregon, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin linked to I.M. Healthy brand Soy Nut Butter

map-big-3-7-17soynut-butter-productSixteen people infected with the outbreak strain of STEC O157:H7 have been reported from nine states. Arizona, 4, California, 4, Maryland, 1, Missouri, 1, New Jersey, 1, Oregon, 2, Virginia, 1, Washington, 1 and Wisconsin, 1.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2017 to February 21, 2017. Ill people range in age from 2 to 48 years, with a median age of 10. Fourteen (88%) of the 16 ill people are younger than 18 years old. Among ill people, 63% are male. Eight ill people have been hospitalized and five people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported.

In interviews, ill people or their family members answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Fifteen (100%) of the 15 people reached for interview reported either eating I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter at home (nine people) in the week before they became ill, attending a facility that served I.M. Health brand SoyNut Butter (two people), or attending childcare centers that served I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter and I.M. Healthy brand granola coated with SoyNut Butter (four people).