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Foodborne Illness Outbreaks

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5th Antioch Farms Brand A La Kiev Raw Stuffed Chicken Breast Salmonella Outbreak

781439300328-300x300Minnesota state health and agriculture officials said today that seven recent cases of salmonellosis in Minnesota have been linked to raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken entrees. Investigators from the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) determined that the illnesses occurred in two separate outbreaks, involving two different strains of Salmonella bacteria in products from two distinct, unrelated producers.

In the first outbreak, four illnesses occurring from April 5 through June 8 were linked to Barber Foods Chicken Kiev. This product has a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) stamped code of P-276. This product is sold at many different retailers, including grocery store chains. The four cases in this outbreak ranged in age from 19 to 82 years, all from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

In the second outbreak, three people got sick from May 9 to June 8 after eating Antioch Farms brand Cordon Bleu raw stuffed chicken breast with a U.S. Department of Agriculture stamped code of P-1358. This product is sold at many different grocery store chains. The three cases were all adults in their 30s and 40s from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

No deaths have been linked to either outbreak. MDH and MDA are working with USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) on the investigation. The investigation is on-going.

With these two outbreaks, there have now been nine outbreaks of salmonellosis in Minnesota linked to these types of products since 1998.

In 2014 Minnesota Public health and agriculture investigators in identified 6 cases of Salmonella Enteriditis linked to consumption of Antioch Farms brand A La Kiev raw stuffed chicken breast. Illness onsets occurred in August and September 2014. The outbreak strain was isolated in packages purchased at grocery stores.

In addition, Plant 1358 Aspen Foods was linked to Salmonella Outbreaks in 2005 S. Heidelberg2005-6 S. Enteritidis and 2006-S. Typhimurium.

Barber Foods Recalls Salmonella Stuffed Chicken – Antioch Farms Not Yet

Barber Foods, a Portland, Maine establishment, is recalling approximately 58,320 pounds of frozen, raw stuffed chicken product that may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The Chicken Kiev item was produced on January 29, 2015; February 20, 2015; and April 23, 2015. The following product is subject to recall: [View Label (PDF only)]

  • 2-lb. 4-oz. cardboard box containing 6 individually pouched pieces of “BARBER FOODS PREMIUM ENTREES BREADED-BONELESS RAW STUFFED CHICKEN BREASTS WITH RIB MEAT KIEV” with use by/sell by date of April 28, 2016, May 20, 2016 and July 21, 2016 and Lot Code number 0950292102, 0950512101, or 0951132202.

The product subject to recall bears the establishment number “P-276” inside the USDA mark of inspection. This product was shipped to Sam’s Club retail stores in Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin. The product subject to recall has not been available for retail sales since June 26, 2015; however, FSIS suspects that consumers may have this item in their freezers.

In the Barber Foods outbreak, four illnesses occurring from April 5 through June 8 were linked to its Chicken Kiev. This product has a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) stamped code of P-276. This product is sold at many different retailers, including grocery store chains. The four cases in this outbreak ranged in age from 19 to 82 years, all from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

In the second outbreak, where there has been no recall to date, three people got sick from May 9 to June 8 after eating Antioch Farms brand Cordon Bleu raw stuffed chicken breast with a U.S. Department of Agriculture stamped code of P-1358. This product is sold at many different grocery store chains. The three cases were all adults in their 30s and 40s from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Salmonella cases linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken products

State health and agriculture officials said today that seven recent cases of salmonellosis in Minnesota have been linked to raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken entrees.

The illnesses prompted health officials to remind consumers that the products may look cooked, but are in fact raw and should be handled carefully to avoid cross-contamination in the kitchen and then always cooked thoroughly.

Investigators from the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) and the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) determined that the illnesses occurred in two separate outbreaks, involving two different strains of Salmonella bacteria inproducts from two distinct, unrelated producers.

In the first outbreak, four illnesses occurring from April 5 through June 8 were linked to Barber Foods Chicken Kiev. This product has a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) stamped code of P-276. This product is sold at many different retailers, including grocery store chains. The four cases in this outbreak ranged in age from 19 to 82 years, all from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

781439300328In the second outbreak, three people got sick from May 9 to June 8 after eating Antioch Farms brand Cordon Bleu raw stuffed chicken breast with a U.S. Department of Agriculture stamped code of P-1358. This product is sold at many different grocery store chains. The three cases were all adults in their 30s and 40s from the metro area, and two were hospitalized.

No deaths have been linked to either outbreak. MDH and MDA are working with USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) on the investigation. The investigation is on-going.

With these two outbreaks, there have now been nine outbreaks of salmonellosis in Minnesota linked to these types of products since 1998. “These chicken products are raw, breaded and pre-browned and  often found near pre-cooked products at the grocery store, so even though the current labels state that the product is raw, consumers could mistakenly think the product is pre-cooked,” said Carlota Medus, epidemiologist for the Foodborne Illness Unit at MDH. Improvements were made to the labeling of such products in 2008, but three outbreaks have occurred from eating the raw, stuffed chicken products since 2014.

“Another problem is that consumers could accidentally contaminate their hands and kitchen surfaces prior to cooking,” Medus said. “Since these products are pre-browned and often cooked from the frozen state, they may appear safer when handling than other raw meats that may be noticeably dripping juices.”

Salmonella is sometimes present in raw chicken, which is why it is important for consumers to always follow safe food-handling practices. This includes cooking all raw poultry products to an internal temperature of at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit, which kills the Salmonella bacteria. “The problem arises when consumers don’t realize that they are handling and preparing a raw product,” said Alida Sorenson, an investigator for the MDA Dairy and Food Inspection Division. Consumers should handle them as carefully as they would any other raw meats, she said.

Consumers with these products in their freezers, if they choose to use them, should cook them thoroughly. Other important food handling practices include washing hands thoroughly after handling raw meat, keeping raw and cooked foods separate to avoid cross-contamination, and placing cooked meat on a clean plate or platter before serving.

Symptoms of salmonellosis include diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramps and fever. Symptoms usually begin within 12 to 72 hours after exposure, but can begin up to a week after exposure. Salmonella infections usually resolve in 5 to 7 days, but approximately 28 percent of laboratory-confirmed cases require hospitalization. Invasive infections (e.g., blood stream infections, meningitis) occasionally occur. In rare cases, Salmonella infection can lead to death, particularly in the elderly or those with weakened immune systems.
Approximately 700 cases of salmonellosis are reported each year in Minnesota.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

Staphylococcus aureus Cause of 86 Children Sickened at Alabama Day Care

The Alabama Department of Public Health has determined that SunnySide Child Care Center has complied with all necessary training and operational requirements. As a result of the compliance by the center, the emergency closure order for the kitchen has been lifted. During an investigation of an outbreak, the childcare center staff was very cooperative with Public Health staff. The Montgomery County Environmental Staff will continue to closely monitor food-handling operations.

The day care centers were closed by Public Health so that an investigation could be conducted after reports of a widespread illness causing 86 children attending the two-day care centers to be seen at three Montgomery hospitals in association with a potential outbreak. The children had symptoms of lethargy, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and cramps. Thirty children were hospitalized.

During the investigation, public health staff inspected the centers in Montgomery and collected clinical and environmental samples that were processed at the Bureau of Clinical Laboratories and conducted a detailed questionnaire to help determine the cause of the outbreak.

The Alabama Department of Public Health Bureau of Clinical Laboratories has confirmed that the same Staphylococcus aureus toxin-producing bacteria that grew from several food products served at a Montgomery child care center matches the bacteria from samples taken from children who became ill after ingesting food at the center.

Public health environmentalists have worked with SunnySide Child Care Center employees regarding the kitchen and food handling to avoid any reoccurrence and prevent future food-related outbreaks. Operations at the facility were resumed Monday.

Other clinical samples tested were negative as of July 1.

Minnesota Breaks Another Chicken Salmonella Outbreak

Chicken_Cordon_Bleu_I-1The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella that may be associated with raw, frozen, breaded and pre-browned, stuffed chicken products. These items may be labeled “chicken cordon bleu” or “chicken Kiev”.

FSIS was notified of, and is investigating with the State of Minnesota, a Salmonella Enteritidis illness cluster on June 23, 2015. FSIS suspects that there is a link between the frozen, raw, breaded and pre-browned stuffed chicken products and this illness cluster based on information gathered in conjunction with the State of Minnesota Departments of Health and Agriculture. Using epidemiological evidence, case-patients have been identified in Minnesota with illness onset dates ranging from May 9, 2015 to June 8, 2015.

Additionally, on June 24, 2015, FSIS was notified of, and is investigating with the State of Minnesota, a second, separate Salmonella Enteritidis illness cluster with another strain. FSIS suspects that there is a link between the frozen, raw, breaded and pre-browned stuffed chicken products and this illness cluster based on information gathered in conjunction with the State of Minnesota Departments of Health and Agriculture. Using epidemiological evidence, case-patients have been identified in Minnesota with illness onset dates ranging from April 5, 2015 to June 8, 2015.

The products the illnesses may be associated with appear to be ready-to-eat, but are in fact raw and need to be fully cooked before consumption. Frozen, raw, breaded and pre-browned stuffed chicken products covered by this alert and similar products, may be stuffed or filled, breaded or browned.

Boise Co-op Salmonella Toll – 290 Ill

oboise-300x169The Central District Health Department (CDHD) is investigating a Salmonella outbreak associated with the Boise Co-op deli – specifically food purchased from the deli after June 1, 2015.

As of July 1, 2015, approximately 290 cases of Salmonella are associated with this outbreak. Preliminary test results showed Salmonella growth in raw turkey, tomatoes and onion. However, additional laboratory tests are pending and the specific cause of the outbreak remains undetermined.

Salmonella is a bacteria that can cause diarrheal illness in humans. They are microscopic living creatures that pass from the feces of people or animals to other people or other animals. There are many different kinds of Salmonella bacteria.

Salmonella serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella serotype Enteritidis are the most common in the United States.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

Tarheel Salmonella Outbreak Nearly 250 with one Death

635706784034234882-new-Tarheel-Q-300x225According to the North Carolina Department of Health, 248 cases of diarrheal illness associated with Salmonella and eating food from Tarheel Q Restaurant have been identified.

Of these 248, case distribution includes 19 North Carolina counties and 5 states. Of the North Carolina cases 72% of cases are residents of Davidson County and Davie County.

Laboratory testing indicates that the BBQ sample and a sample from a patient who became ill during the beginning of the outbreak are both positive for Salmonella species. The serogroup was found to be Typhimurium. Both samples have the same PFGE pattern (i.e. DNA fingerprint). Over 50 additional clinical specimens are pending results at the state lab.

Of these 248 cases:

55% are male

41% are between the ages of 20 and 49

20% have visited their provider

13% have visited the ED

6% have been hospitalized

1 death has been identified (Further details regarding the deceased are not available to protect patient confidentiality.)

79% of cases had illness onset dates between Tuesday, June 16, 2015, and Sunday, June 21, 2015.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

232 cases of Salmonella illness associated with eating food from Tarheel Q Restaurant

Of these 232, case distribution includes 16 North Carolina counties and 5 states.

Of the North Carolina cases 75% of cases are residents of Davidson County and Davie County.

Laboratory testing indicates that the BBQ sample and a sample from a patient who became ill during the beginning of the outbreak are both positive for Salmonella species. The serogroup was found to be Typhimurium. Both samples have the same PFGE pattern (i.e. DNA fingerprint).

Over 50 additional clinical specimens are pending results at the state lab.

Of these 232 cases:

  • 53% are male
  • 41% are between the ages of 20 and 49
  • 19% have visited their provider
  • 13% have visited the ED
  • 6% have been hospitalized
  • No deaths due to Salmonella infection have been identified
  • 79% of cases had illness onset dates between Tuesday, June 16, 2015, and Sunday, June 21, 2015.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

Pregnant Idaho Woman Files Lawsuit Against Boise Co-op After Falling Ill With Salmonella Poisoning; Number of Confirmed Illnesses Rises to 280

Outbreak tied to food prepared and sold by the Co-op deli, including food purchased at the Boise airport

 Ada County resident Alice Jessup has filed a lawsuit against Boise Consumer Cooperative, Inc., d/b/a Boise Co-op. Jessup, who is pregnant, is suing over a severe case of salmonella poisoning she suffered after eating food from the Boise airport earlier this month that was prepared by the Co-op. Jessup is represented by Robie G. Russell of Russell Law Offices, and William D. Marler of Marler Clark Food Safety Law Firm, LLP.  Marler Clark is representing three dozen victims in the outbreak, and has previously filed three other lawsuits.

On or about June 7, 2015, Alice Jessup purchased a chicken salad sandwich at a kiosk in the Boise airport that sold sandwiches prepared by Boise Co-op. She ate the sandwich the same day. She began to experience symptoms of Salmonella poisoning the very next day, which included severe abdominal cramps and repeated bouts of diarrhea. At this point, Jessup was approximately 28 weeks pregnant.

Over the next several days, while visiting family in California, Jessup’s symptoms worsened. She continued to suffer from severe diarrhea—at its worst, occurring hourly. She also developed a slight fever and headache.

On or about Wednesday, June 10, Mrs. Jessup arose from bed in the early morning hours and informed her mother she needed to be taken to the hospital. She was concerned about her well being, as well as that of her unborn child. She was transferred from the emergency department to the maternal ward, where she went through triage and received intravenous fluids for rehydration. She was discharged and advised to take Imodium for the diarrhea and Tylenol for the fever.

After returning to her parent’s home, Jessup’s symptoms worsened. Her fever rose to 102 degrees, and the diarrhea continued despite the medication. She had also begun having contractions, which lasted for a couple of days, and was becoming more and more distressed over the welfare of her baby. She returned to the hospital on Thursday, June 11, where this time, she was admitted and remained until Saturday, when her symptoms began to subside.

During Jessup’s hospitalization, she submitted a stool sample that tested positive for Salmonella. At a medical visit on June 26, during a check-up, she was cleared to travel, but her illness causes continued concerns about her pregnancy and the delivery of her child, which is due on August 30, 2015.

“Salmonella is an incredibly uncomfortable illness. I can’t imagine having to deal with that while also being pregnant,” said Bill Marler, co-founder and partner with Marler Clark. “Unfortunately, pregnant women are more susceptible to foodborne illnesses like Salmonella, and long term effects are more common.”

Marler has been an advocate for victims of food borne illnesses since representing those made sickest by an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 traced back to fast food giant Jack in the Box. He has represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and is seen as an expert on food safety.

Salmonella is the second most common foodborne illness in the United States. Approximately 1.4 million cases of Salmonella occur each year with 95% of those caused by tainted food. The acute symptoms of Salmonella include the sudden onset of nausea, abdominal cramping, and bloody diarrhea and mucous over a period of days. While there is no cure, infected persons usually recover completely, although it may take months. A small number of people experience ongoing symptoms such as joint pain, which can lead to chronic arthritis.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Tarheel Q Salmonella Outbreak Hits 216

North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services reports tonight that 216 people have developed a Salmonella infection linked to Tarheel Q restaurant in Lexington, North Carolina.

Case distribution includes 15 North Carolina counties and 5 states. Of the North Carolina cases 77% of cases are residents of Davidson County and Davie County.

Laboratory testing indicates that the BBQ sample and a sample from a patient who became ill during the beginning of the outbreak are both positive for Salmonella species. The serogroup was found to be Typhimurium. Both samples have the same PFGE pattern (i.e. DNA fingerprint).

Over 20 additional clinical specimens are pending results at the state lab.

Of these 216 cases:

  • 56% are male
  • 43% are between the ages of 20 and 49
  • 20% have visited their provider
  • 12% have visited the ED
  • 6% have been hospitalized
  • No deaths due to Salmonella infection have been identified
  • 82% of cases had illness onset dates between Tuesday, June 16, 2015, and Sunday, June 21, 2015.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.