Texas officials say all raw milk and other unpasteurized products from K-Bar Dairy should not be consumed and should immediately be discarded because the dairy has been linked to an antibiotic-resistant strain of Brucella bacteria that has hospitalized at least one person.

“At this time, it is uncertain how long Brucella (bacteria) may have been present in the raw milk from this dairy. Testing is ongoing in an attempt to answer that question,” according to the Monday alert from the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS).

Especially at risk is anyone who has consumed raw milk or other unpasteurized dairy products from K-Bar Dairy, which is in Paradise, TX, since June 1. These individuals are considered to be at high risk of contracting brucellosis.

However, all unpasteurized dairy products sold since Jan. 1 this year are suspect at this point. Anyone who has become ill this year after consuming raw dairy products from K-Bar should seek medical attention, even if the symptoms have subsided, according to the state health alert.

The health department did not indicate whether the dairy, which is licensed for on-farm sales of unpasteurized milk, is continuing to operate.

Read the Advice to Students and Employees Working in Laboratories

CDC and public health officials in several states have identified a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections linked to various clinical, commercial, and teaching microbiology laboratories.

Twenty-four people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium were reported from 16 states.

Six ill people were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

This strain of Salmonella Typhimurium has previously been associated with infections linked to microbiology laboratory exposure in 2011 and 2014.

Laboratory-associated salmonellosis continues to be a public health problem. This outbreak is a reminder that bacteria used in microbiology laboratories can sicken people who work in labs. Others who live in their households can also get sick, even if the household members never visited the laboratory.

Guidance documents for work with Salmonella and other similar human pathogens can be found on the Key Resources page.

FIOS1 reports that on June 10, 2017 was the day Jay and Jennifer Gorinson had been dreaming of: a wedding that seemed as perfect as can be. But in the days following, the newlyweds faced a nightmare.

“We were notified on the first day of our honeymoon of a potential infection of hepatitis A,” said Jay Gorinson, the groom.

The couple’s nearly 200 guests are at risk for Hepatitis A. The Health Department confirmed that a bartender at their wedding venue, Monteverde at Oldstone in Cortlandt Manor, was infected.

“It’s embarrassing. The first notification that I had to put out about our marriage was warning our guests, family members and loved ones about a potential virus infection,” continued Gorinson.

The viral liver disease is transmitted by ingesting contaminated food, water, or in case, possibly through an infectious person. Gorinson detailed just how many people were at risk of contamination:

“All attendees essentially that may have been inside the mansion, including my 1 and 3-year-old nephew and niece, who just got vaccinated today as well and incurred about $700 worth of charges that I contacted Monteverde about today and they said it was an unfortunate circumstance and they had no further comment after that.”

The newlyweds spent Tuesday at the Health Department getting vaccinated like most of their attendees nationwide have had to do. They say they reached out to the venue for about a week and it wasn’t until today that they heard from them for the first time.

“Why didn’t Monteverde contact us? It’s just sad, embarrassing, and most of all frustrating that we’re not getting any type of communication really,” added Gorinson.

Since then, the county officials have worked to locate Montverde guests, notify them and offer a vaccination option, according to Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino:

“There are now more than 200 people or so that we are trying to contact in 10 states, the District of Columbia, NYC – so it’s a monumental effort by the Health Department to reach everybody just so they are safe.”

A sick employee at a restaurant and event space in Cortlandt Manor has Westchester County’s Health Department offering free testing to people who may have been exposed to Hepatitis A.

The health department has treated about 130 people at three clinics. About 350 people are estimated to have dined at Monteverde at Oldstone between May 24 and June 10. The patrons include a wedding party with guests from 11 states including neighboring New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

The county health department is being assisted in reaching wedding guests by health departments in those states and New York City. A number of people connected with the wedding have already received treatment.

Preventative treatment is only effective if given within 14 days of the exposure. Failure to be vaccinated does not necessarily result in infection, health officials said. Anyone who develops symptoms should contact their doctor of the health department immediately.

A fourth free clinic will be held on Tuesday in White Plains from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the county health department, 134 Court Street.

Hepatitis A is a viral liver disease transmitted by ingesting contaminated food or water or through direct contact with an infectious person. Hepatitis A is generally a mild illness that affects the liver. Symptoms include fatigue, fever, poor appetite, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dark urine and yellowing of the skin and eyes, and can develop from two weeks to two months after exposure.

Hepatitis A:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Hepatitis A outbreaks. The Hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Hepatitis A lawyers have litigated Hepatitis A cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of sources, such as green onions, lettuce and restaurant food.  The law firm has brought Hepatitis A lawsuits against such companies as Costco, Subway, McDonald’s, Red Robin, Chipotle, Quiznos and Carl’s Jr.  We proudly represented the family of Donald Rockwell, who died after consuming hepatitis A tainted food and Richard Miller, wo required a liver transplant after eating food at a Chi-Chi’s restaurant.

If you or a family member became ill with a Hepatitis A infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Hepatitis A attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The cases of Salmonella in Cole County have increased to 25 since last week.

In an official press release, the Cole County Health Department explained that “CCHD has alerted City of Jefferson Environmental Public Health staff, who has jurisdiction over food establishments in Jefferson City, about food establishments that sick individuals have eaten at.”

Salmonella is the second most common intestinal infection in the United States. More than 7,000 cases of Salmonella were confirmed in 2009; however the majority of cases go unreported.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that over 1 million people in the U.S. contract Salmonella each year, and that an average of 20,000 hospitalizations and almost 400 deaths occur from Salmonella poisoning, according to a 2011 report.

Salmonella infection usually occurs when a person eats food contaminated with the feces of animals or humans carrying the bacteria.  Salmonella outbreaks are commonly associated with eggs, meat and poultry, but these bacteria can also contaminate other foods such as fruits and vegetables. Foods that are most likely to contain Salmonella include raw or undercooked eggs, raw milk, contaminated water, and raw or undercooked meats.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

027-2017-labelH & B Packing Co., Inc., a Waco, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 73,742 pounds of boneless beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O103, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The boneless beef items were produced on March 6, 2017. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 60-lb. box containing boneless beef with case code 69029 and production date 03/06/17.
  • Multiple combo bins containing 73,682-lbs of boneless beef with case code 69029 and production date 03/06/17.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. M13054” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to food manufacturers within the state of Texas.

The problem was discovered when FSIS was notified by the State of Texas’ Meat Safety Assurance Unit about a positive non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli sample.

There have been no confirmed reports of illnesses due to consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), such as STEC O103 because it is harder to identify than STEC O157. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after consuming the organism. Most people infected with STEC O103 develop diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended.

Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is uncommon with STEC O103 infection. HUS can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in customers’ freezers.

Customers who have purchased these products are urged not to use them.

VULTO-Creamery-Raw-Milk-Cheese-Listeria-RecallVulto Creamery, Walton, New York, is out of an abundance of caution expanded the recall to include all lots for four additional cheeses which include, by name the following: Andes, Blue Blais, Hamden & Walton Umber. In summary, Vulto Creamery has recalled the following eight cheese items: Heinennellie, Miranda, Willowemoc, Ouleout, Andes, Blue Blais, Hamden & Walton Umber due to potential contamination of Listeria monocytogenesListeria monocytogenes is a bacterium which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, pregnant women and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Listeria infection can cause miscarriages, stillbirths and fetal infection among pregnant women.

The raw milk cheeses were distributed nationwide, with most being sold at retail locations in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States, California, Chicago Illinois, Portland Oregon and Washington, D.C.

Testing results from the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the New York Department of Agriculture and Markets identified Ouleout product contamination. The particular strain of Listeria monocytogenes found in the New York Department of Agriculture and Markets was found to be similar to the strain isolated from a cluster outbreak of Listeriosis responsible for 6 illnesses and 2 confirmed deaths.

Consumers that have any of these cheeses from Vulto Creamery should return the cheese to the purchase location for a refund. Food and cheese wholesalers and retailers with any Vulto Creamery cheeses on hand should immediately remove these products from common storage coolers and quarantine these cheeses in a secured area of a cooler. Any wholesaler or distributor that has any of the eight Vulto Creamery cheeses should contact Vulto Creamery to receive instructions on what to do with the cheese. No recalled cheese should be destroyed until Vulto Creamery has been notified and agrees.

The production and distribution of all cheese products have been suspended while FDA and the company continue to investigate the source of the problem.

Link to Original Recall.

AC Creamery Inc. of Anaheim, CA, is recalling its 16 ounce packages of “Manila Sky Purple Yumm Ice Cream” because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled “Manila Sky Purple Yumm Ice Cream” were distributed nationwide in retail stores and events such as; Florida Food & Lodging Show, Festival of Philippine Arts & Culture and California State University Pilipino American Student Association (CSUF PASA) Friendship Games

The product comes in a 16 ounce, paper cup marked with an expiration date of Mar 06, 2018 stamped on the bottom.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found samples positive for Listeria monocytogenes in the contract manufacturer’s, Dr. Bob’s of Upland, LLC, facility, and in finished product of another company’s brand, leading the contract manufacturer to recall all ice cream products produced this year.

Out of an abundance of caution, McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams is undertaking a voluntary recall of selected, 16 oz. (pint size) packages of ice cream produced by a contract manufacturer because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The seven affected flavors, available only in pints, accounts for approximately 15% of the pint-packaged ice cream products carrying the McConnell’s brand label. All of the recalled products were manufactured and packaged in a facility owned by a contract manufacturer, Dr. Bob’s of Upland, LLC. No other products were affected. Ice cream produced at McConnell’s Santa Barbara facility are not included in the recall. No illnesses have been reported.

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infections can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found samples positive for Listeria monocytogenes in the contract manufacturer’s facility and in finished product of another company’s brand, leading the contract manufacturer to recall all ice cream products it produced for McConnell’s and other ice cream companies this year.

Because this recall affects only McConnell’s products manufactured by the contract manufacturer facility, it is important that consumers carefully check the following flavor/code date combinations to be certain the correct products are removed.

The following flavors and “Best By” code dates are being recalled:

Dutchman’s Chocolate JUL 27 2017, OCT 01 2017 and OCT 05 2017
Mint Chip SEP 08 2017, SEP 30 2017, OCT 07 2017, DEC 01, 2017, DEC 30, 2017, JAN 04, 2018, JAN 05, 2018
Peppermint Stick JUL 25, 2017, JUL 26, 2017, SEP 30, 2017

 

Salted Caramel Chip OCT 07, 2017, OCT 20, 2017, DEC 22, 2017, JAN 06, 2018, JAN 07, 2018
Sweet Cream JUL 27, 2017, SEP 08, 2017, OCT 01, 2017, OCT 21, 2017, DEC 08, 2017, DEC 21, 2017, DEC 24, 2017
Turkish Coffee JUL 28, 2017, SEP 22, 2017, OCT 07, 2017, Dec 06, 2017
Vanilla Bean JUL 13, 2017, JUL 25, 2017, JUL 27, 2017, OCT 01, 2017, OCT 15, 2017, DEC 07, 2017, DEC 25, 2017, JAN 03, 2018, JAN 06, 2018

The recalled ice cream was distributed in AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, MI, MN, MS, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, TN, TX, UT, VA, WA and WI to retail stores.

The product comes in a 16-ounce (pint size) paper package marked with “Best By” lot numbers listed above and printed in black on the bottom of the carton.

Consumers who have purchased any of the seven 16-ounce (pint size) packages of McConnell’s ice cream should not eat these products and are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

ISB Food Group, LLC of Los Angeles, California is recalling Nancy’s Fancy Butterscotch Budino Gelato and Nancy’s Fancy Peanut Butter with Crunchy Peanuts Gelato with expiration dates of March 18, 2017, because they were produced in a co-packing facility that has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Nancy’s Fancy Butterscotch Budino Gelato and Nancy’s Fancy Peanut Butter with Crunchy Peanuts Gelato with expiration dates of March 18, 2017, were distributed from March to October 2016 in California, Oregon and Texas.

The product is in plastic pint-sized containers with the Nancy’s Fancy brand name, Butterscotch Budino flavor and Peanut Butter with Crunchy Peanuts flavor, specifically stamped on the bottom with the expiration date of March 18, 2017.

No illnesses have been reported to date, and no Nancy’s Fancy product has been found to be contaminated.

The recall is the result of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finding samples positive for Listeria monocytogenes in the facility of the contract manufacturer, Dr. Bob’s of Upland, LLC, and in finished product of an unrelated company’s brand that was manufactured at the Dr. Bob’s facility, leading the contract manufacturer to recall all ice cream products produced this year at its facility.   The continuous production line at Dr. Bob’s that tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes was used to produce Nancy’s Fancy Butterscotch Budino and Peanut Butter with Crunchy Peanuts flavors in March of 2016.  ISB Food Group has only used the Dr. Bob’s facility for co-packing once in 2016, in March, and will not produce in the Dr. Bob’s facility going forward.

ISB Food Group, LLC is recalling L.A. Creamery Honeycomb ice cream and L.A. Creamery Salted Caramel ice cream with expiration dates of March 18, 2017, because they were produced in a co-packing facility that has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

L.A. Creamery Honeycomb and L.A. Creamery Salted Caramel with expiration dates of March 18, 2017, were distributed from March to October 2016 in California, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Florida, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Massachusetts.

The product is in paper 14 oz. ice cream containers with the L.A. Creamery brand name, Salted Caramel flavor and Honeycomb flavors, specifically stamped on the bottom of the container with the expiration date of March 18, 2017.

No illnesses have been reported to date, and no L.A. Creamery product has been found to be contaminated.

The recall is the result of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finding samples positive for Listeria monocytogenes in the facility of the contract manufacturer, Dr. Bob’s of Upland, LLC, and in finished product of an unrelated company’s brand that was manufactured at the Dr. Bob’s facility, leading the contract manufacturer to recall all ice cream products produced this year at its facility. The continuous production line at Dr. Bob’s that tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes was used to produce L.A. Creamery Salted Caramel and L.A. Creamery Honeycomb flavors in March of 2016.  ISB Food Group has only used the Dr. Bob’s facility for co-packing once in 2016, in March, and will not produce in the Dr. Bob’s facility going forward.

Several states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of foodborne hepatitis A. Evidence indicates frozen strawberries imported from Egypt are the likely source of this outbreak. The recall affects all frozen strawberries and frozen strawberry products imported into the United States by the International Company for Agricultural Production & Processing (ICAPP) since January 1, 2016. The products were NOT offered for sale in retail stores such as grocery stores or food warehouses (e.g. Costco or Sam’s Club). The frozen strawberries were distributed to restaurants. Most of the outbreak-related human infections have occurred on the East coast. There are currently no hepatitis A cases in Colorado associated with this outbreak.

At this time, two establishments in Weld County served affected frozen strawberry products within the past 14 days:

  •  Fat Alberts restaurant (Greeley) served strawberries on top of dessert items, last served October 24, 2016.
  •  Red Rooster restaurant (Longmont) served strawberries on top of breakfast items, last served by October 28, 2016.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver infection that results from exposure to the hepatitis A virus. Illness from hepatitis A generally begins around 28 days after exposure (a range of 15–50 days) and symptoms include:

  •  Fatigue
  •  Stomach pain
  •  Yellowing of the skin and eye (jaundice)
  •  Dark urine
  •  Clay-colored stool

Hepatitis A can range from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months. In rare cases, the infection can lead to liver failure, particularly in individuals who have a pre-existing liver disease or weakened immune systems.

“If you have been exposed to hepatitis A, you can prevent infection by having a hepatitis A vaccine or immunoglobulin therapy within two weeks of exposure,” said Mark E. Wallace, MD, MPH, Executive Director of the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment. “If it has been more than 14 days since you have eaten these berries, the vaccine won’t be effective in preventing infection.”

If you ate items containing strawberries from the above listed locations, contact your health care provider to discuss your options. Certain pharmacies also may offer hepatitis A vaccine. Visit vaccinefinder.org for locations near you. If you have been vaccinated for hepatitis A, you do not need to be vaccinated again, even if you ate the affected strawberries.

Vaccinations are also available at the Weld County Health Department main office (1555 North 17th Avenue, Greeley) and the Southwest Weld County Health Department satellite office (4209 County Road 241⁄2 Road, Longmont— I-25 and Hwy 119) during normal business hours. Call 970-400-2703 for an appointment.

For more information, Weld County residents may contact COHelp at 1-877-462-2911 or 303-389-1687. COHelp is available 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday – Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends.

statemap-2Arkansas, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Virginia, Wisconsin, West Virginia and CDC, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are continuing to investigate a multistate outbreak of foodborne hepatitis A. Information available at this time does not indicate an ongoing risk of acquiring hepatitis A virus infection at Tropical Smoothie Café’s, as the contaminated food product has been removed as of August 8. Symptoms of hepatitis A virus infection can take up to 50 days to appear.

As a result, CDC continues to identify cases of hepatitis A related to the initial contaminated product. As of September 14, 2016:

127 people with hepatitis A have been reported from eight states: Arkansas (1), Maryland (12), New York (3), North Carolina (1), Oregon (1), Virginia (102), West Virginia (6), and Wisconsin (1).

47 ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic and traceback evidence indicate frozen strawberries imported from Egypt are the likely source of this outbreak.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Hepatitis A outbreaks. The Hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Hepatitis A lawyers have litigated Hepatitis A cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of sources, such as green onions, lettuce and restaurant food.  The law firm has brought Hepatitis A lawsuits against such companies as Costco, Subway, McDonald’s, Red Robin, Chipotle, Quiznos and Carl’s Jr.  We proudly represented the family of Donald Rockwell, who died after consuming hepatitis A tainted food and Richard Miller, wo required a liver transplant after eating food at a Chi-Chi’s restaurant.

If you or a family member became ill with a Hepatitis A infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Hepatitis A attorneys for a free case evaluation.