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Grande Produce Linked to Caribeña brand Maradol Papaya Salmonella Outbreak

The FDA, CDC, MDH and other state and local officials are investigating Salmonella Kiambu and Salmonella Thompson illnesses linked to Caribeña brand Maradol papayas from Mexico distributed by Grande Produce in San Juan, TX.

FDA and state partners continue to investigate the distribution of the papayas involved in this outbreak. It appears the distribution pattern of Caribeña brand Maradol papayas does not explain all of the illnesses, meaning other firms likely have distributed contaminated Maradol papayas as well. At this time, the farm(s) producing these papayas appear to only be in Mexico.

CDC reports 47 cases, 12 hospitalizations and one death from 12 states in the Salmonella Kiambu outbreak. The states involved are IA, KY, LA, MA, MD, MN, NJ, NY, PA, TX, UT and VA. CDC is working to collect additional information to determine whether the recent Salmonella Thompson illness in Maryland is part of this multistate outbreak.

On June 26, 2017, the CDC notified the FDA about a Salmonella Kiambu cluster detected by PulseNet. All 47 cases have the same pattern by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) analysis was conducted on ten patient samples in the outbreak cluster and all were highly related. This indicates that the patients were likely sickened by the same type of food.

MDH informed the FDA, CDC and state partners that several ill people shopped at the same Baltimore retail location and purchased papayas. Records and samples of green and yellow papaya were collected. On July 17, 2017, Maryland reported that three of ten samples had preliminarily tested positive for Salmonella. All positive samples were Caribeña brand yellow Maradol papayas from Mexico; none of the green papayas were positive. However, as noted above, Maradol papayas are green before they ripen and turn yellow, so consumers should not eat Caribeña brand papayas regardless of the color.

On July 19, 2017, MDH issued an advisory warning consumers not to eat Caribeña brand yellow Maradol papayas. Further WGS testing linked one of the papaya samples to the Salmonella Kiambu outbreak and another to Salmonella Thompson.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

In 2011 Mexican Papayas sickened 106 in US with Salmonella

In 2011, the CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collaborated with public health officials in Texas, Illinois, Georgia, and other states to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Agona infections linked to whole, fresh papayas imported from Mexico.

A total of 106 individuals infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agona were reported from 25 states between January 1 and August 25, 2011. The number of ill persons identified in each state with the outbreak strain was as follows: Arkansas (1), Arizona (4), California (8), Colorado (1), Georgia (8), Illinois (18), Indiana (1), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (2), Massachusetts (1), Minnesota (3), Missouri (3), Nebraska (2), Nevada (1), New Jersey (1), New Mexico (3), New York (9), Ohio (1), Oklahoma (1), Pennsylvania (2), Tennessee (1), Texas (25), Virginia (2), Washington (5), and Wisconsin (2).

Among persons for whom information is available, illnesses began on or after January 17, 2011. Ill persons ranged in age from less than 1 year old to 91 years old, and the median age was 21 years old. Thirty-nine percent of patients were younger than 5 years old. Fifty-six percent were female. Eleven persons reported travel to Mexico in the week before they became ill. Ten patients were hospitalized. No deaths were reported.

Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory investigations conducted by officials in many local, state, and federal public health, agriculture, and regulatory agencies linked this outbreak to eating fresh, whole papayas imported from Mexico by Agromod Produce, Inc. of McAllen, Texas. Among 56 ill persons for whom information is available, 57% reported consuming papayas in the week before illness onset. This was significantly different compared with results from a survey of healthy persons in which 11% of persons of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity and 3% of non-Hispanic/Latino ethnicity reported consuming papaya in the 7 days before they were interviewed. Product information such as date and location of purchase of papayas was collected from ill persons and used by local, state, and federal public health, agriculture, and regulatory agencies to conduct traceback investigations. Agromod Produce, Inc. was identified as a common supplier of papayas purchased by ill persons.

Sampling of papayas by FDA as part of the outbreak investigation identified two samples with Salmonella Agona that were indistinguishable by PFGE from the outbreak strain. One sample was collected at Agromod Produce, Inc. in McAllen, Texas and the other was collected at the U.S.-Mexico border from a shipment destined for Agromod Produce, Inc. These papayas had been imported from Mexico. The shipments from which Salmonella was isolated were not distributed in the United States. FDA is working closely with Agromod Produce Inc. and with Mexican health officials to determine how the papayas became contaminated.

On July 23, 2011, Agromod Produce, Inc. of McAllen, Texas recalled fresh, whole papayas because they had the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. The recall included all Blondie, Yaya, Mañanita, and Tastylicious Brand papayas sold prior to July 23, 2011. These fresh, whole papayas were imported from Mexico and distributed nationwide and to Canada through retail stores and wholesalers.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

New Haven Cilantro Fresh Mexican Grill Salmonella Outbreak

Health Officials Investigate Salmonella Outbreak Involving Patrons of a Restaurant in New Haven

The Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) and the New Haven Health Department (NHHD) are investigating an outbreak of Salmonella infections involving patrons of Cilantro Fresh Mexican Grill, a restaurant at 1158 Whalley Ave. in New Haven, Connecticut.  Cilantro’s owner is cooperating with public health officials and has voluntarily closed the restaurant while the investigation is conducted.

What should people do if they ate at the restaurant during June and feel sick?

Patrons who dined at the restaurant and got sick with fever, nausea, diarrhea, and/or vomiting should consult with their physician, especially if they are still experiencing symptoms.

Patrons with symptoms should not prepare food or drinks for others and should wash their hands with soap and water frequently to prevent spreading the bacteria to others.

Patrons who became or are sick are encouraged to call the Department of Public Health at 860-509-7994 on Monday, July 3rd to report their illness.

What should people do if they ate at the restaurant during June and have no symptoms?

Patrons who dined at Cilantro in June and who do not have any symptoms do not need any special medical evaluation or treatment.

What is Salmonella?

Salmonella bacteria are one of the most common causes of food poisoning in the United States.  Symptoms typically last for four to seven days, and most people get better without treatment.  However, Salmonella can cause more serious illness in certain groups of people, including the elderly, infants and persons with chronic diseases or compromised immune systems.

Salmonella bacteria spread through contaminated food or water.  An individual who is sickened with Salmonella can contaminate food and water, spreading the bacteria to others.  People who are infected with Salmonella should not prepare food or drinks for others until their symptoms have ended.  Restaurant workers and other food handlers who are infected with Salmonella should not return to work until cleared by public health officials.

Legal Help?

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella outbreaks. The Salmonella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.  The law firm has brought Salmonella lawsuits against such companies as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Shigella Hits Souplantation in Camarillo in California

Ventura County Public Health was notified on Thursday, June 22nd, of an unusually high number of Shigella cases in the county. Shigellosis is an infectious disease caused by a group of bacteria called Shigella (shih-GEHL-uh), which most often causes diarrhea and fever. It is highly contagious.

Through a series of interviews with those affected, it has been determined that a number of the cases reported to have eaten at the Souplantation in Camarillo. Of the diners interviewed, there are a total of eight individuals with laboratory evidence of Shigella infection.

Ventura County Public Health’s laboratory sent the culture confirmed samples to the State laboratory for typing.

“We’re tracking these cases closely,” said Public Health Officer Dr. Robert Levin, “and are working closely with Ventura County Environmental Health, which has completed two inspections of the restaurant in the past two days.” Dr. Levin credits Souplantation corporate office for making the decision to close the restaurant, starting Thursday through the weekend, to make certain that all steps have been taken to prevent further cases.

The Souplantation Chief Operating Officer has arrived at the Camarillo location and has been joined by a vice- president and the quality assurance manager. All employees are being put through a sanitary training refresher course, the restaurant is being thoroughly cleaned and all food on the premises is being thrown out.

“Souplantation’s actions have been exemplary. This is the kind of swift and decisive action, which leads to a collaboration with Public Health that results in a rapid resolution of the problem,” added Dr. Levin.
It is not currently clear what the source of the infection is. No one food item has been indicated. All employees are being tested and will need to be cleared before returning to work. There are approximately 40 employees at the restaurant.

Most people who are infected with Shigella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps starting a day or two after they are exposed to the bacteria. Shigellosis usually resolves in 5 to 7 days. Some people who are infected may have no symptoms at all, but may still pass the Shigella bacteria to others. The spread of Shigella can be stopped by frequent and careful hand-washing. Antibiotic treatment is known to decrease the length of illness and to end shedding of the organism within a day or two of starting therapy. People most at risk of serious illness are those with underlying immunosuppressive conditions. Those who may have been exposed who are feeling ill should consult their physician.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Shigella outbreaks. The Shigella lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Shigella and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Shigella lawyers have litigated Shigella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of sources, such as tomatoes, airplane and restaurant food.

If you or a family member became ill with a Shigella infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Shigella attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Chic-a-Peas Recalled due to Listeria

ucm563529Chic-a-Peas, LLC is voluntarily recalling a limited number of Chic-a-Peas Baked Crunchy Chickpeas 2 oz. packages because the product has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

There have been no reports of consumer illness associated with this recall. We are voluntarily recalling these items out of an abundance of caution.

A limited quantity was distributed online and in retail stores nationwide. Retailers and distributors who received the recalled lots have been contacted and asked to pull these lots from their inventory and shelves.

This announcement applies only to the Chic-a-Peas Baked Crunchy Chickpeas products listed below and does not include any other items outside the below lot codes:

Chic-a-Peas, Baked Crunchy Chickpeas, Sea Sat Unit Size: 2.0 oz (57g)
Unit Size Best By Date: 12/27/2017 UPC: 853404004033
Lot Code: 0867

Chic-a-Peas, Baked Crunchy Chickpeas, Fresh Salsa Unit Size: 2.0 oz (57g)
Unit Size Best By Date: 12/27/2017
UPC: 853404004071
Lot Code: 0877

Chic-a-Peas, Baked Crunchy Chickpeas, Falafel Unit Size: 2.0 oz (57g)
Unit Size Best By Date: 12/28/2017 UPC: 853404004026
Lot Code: 0897

The lot codes and best by dates can be found on the back of the package.

Bulletproof Bars Recalled over Listeria in Bars

Bulletproof 360, Inc. (“Bulletproof”) of Bellevue, Washington is recalling five Collagen Protein Bar and Bite products because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The affected products were distributed between April 7, 2017 and June 12, 2017 in retail stores nationally and on bulletproof.com to customers nationally and internationally in the following countries: Australia, Bahrain, Bermuda, Bolivia, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Cayman Islands, China, Finland, France, Germany, Guam, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Liechtenstein, Macau, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Virgin Islands (USA). Products are identified with the following information:

Product Packaged Individual Net Wt. Box Net Wt. Individual UPC Box UPC Use by Dates Lot numbers
Fudge Brownie Collagen Protein Bar Individually packed in foil wrappers, then 12 packed in a box. Bar: 1.58oz (45g) 18.96 oz (540g) 815709021498 815709020811 11/1/2017
11/6/2017
11/14/2017
11/23/2017
12/1/2017
12/19/2017
12/25/2017
0957-011007-011087-011177-011257-011437-011497-01
Fudge Brownie Collagen Protein Bite Individually packed in foil wrappers, then 15 packed in a box. Bite:0.74 oz (21g) 11.10 oz(315 g) 815709021528 815709021535 12/27/17
11/28/2017
12/8/2017
1227-011327-011517-01
Lemon Cookie Collagen Protein Bar Individually packed in foil wrappers, then 12 packed in a box. Bar: 1.58oz (45g) 18.96 oz (540g) 815709021801 815709021795 11/7/2017
11/8/2017
12/14/2017
1017-011027-011387-01
Vanilla Shortbread Collagen Protein Bar Individually packed in foil wrappers, then 12 packed in a box. Bar: 1.58oz (45g) 18.96 oz (540g) 815709021481 815709020804 11/15/2017
11/22/2017
11/29/2017
12/11/2017
1097-011167-011237-011357-01
Vanilla Shortbread Collagen Protein Bite Individually packed in foil wrappers, then 15 packed in a box. Bite:0.74 oz (21g) 11.10 oz(315 g) 815709021504 815709021511 11/20/2017
11/27/2017
1147-011217-01

HVF, Inc. supplied the cashew butter used as an ingredient in the above Bulletproof Collagen Bars and Bites. The affected equipment was not used to process the cashew butter contained in BulletproofCollagen Bars and Bites; however, testing at HVF’s facility found Listeria contamination in another part of the facility.

Cashew and Almond Butter Recalled over Listeria

ucm563408NOW Health Group, Inc. (NOW), of Bloomingdale, Illinois, is expanding the voluntary recall of Ellyndale® Nutty Infusions™ Roasted Cashew Butter – Product Code E0540, Lot# 2125155, and Ginger Wasabi Cashew Butter — Product Code E0541, Lot# 2124118, to include Roasted Almond Butter – Product Code E0545, Lot# 2124119, and Mango Chili Cashew Butter – Product Code E0542, Lot# 2125156. An FDA follow-up inspection of the Nutty Infusions supplier’s facility revealed these lots have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

A limited quantity of Nutty Infusions were distributed online and in retail stores nationwide.

Recalled products include:

Item Number Description Lot Number Best By Date
E0545 Ellyndale® Nutty Infusions™ Roasted Almond Butter, 10 oz. plastic jars 2124119 2/18
E0542 Ellyndale® Nutty Infusions™ Mango Chili Cashew Butter, 10 oz. plastic jars 2125156 3/19

No other Ellyndale® products are affected or are involved in this recall. No illnesses have been reported to date.

Evidence of facility contamination was noted after a follow up FDA inspection of the Nutty Infusions supplier. The production of the product has been suspended.

NOW has provided information on this voluntary recall to all its retailers who purchased these products and has encouraged retailers to make every effort to contact their customers to facilitate the return of affected products.

Customers at Monteverde at Oldstone at risk of Hepatitis A

Dr. Sherlita Amler, Westchester County’s Health Commissioner, is encouraging people who consumed beverages at Monteverde at Oldstone, a restaurant and event space at 28 Bear Mountain Bridge Road in Cortlandt Manor, to protect themselves against Hepatitis A following confirmation that an employee with the disease worked at the restaurant while infectious.Hepatitis A is a viral liver disease transmitted by ingesting contaminated food or water or through direct contact with an infectious person. “The key to prevention is a quick response,” said Westchester County Executive Robert P. Astorino.

Patrons who consumed beverages at Monteverde between May 31 and June 10 are being urged to contact the Westchester County Health Department, which will offer free Hepatitis A treatment on Thursday, June 15, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Monteverde at Oldstone and on Friday, June 16, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Westchester County Health Department clinic at 134 Court Street in White Plains.

No appointments are needed, but individuals interested in attending a clinic are encouraged to pre-register online or call the Health Department at (914) 995-7499.

The Health Department has been contacting all individuals who dined at Monteverde between May 31 and June 10 to alert them to their potential exposure.  The treatment is a Hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin. Anyone age 18 or younger must be accompanied by a parent. Pregnant women who may have been exposed should contact their prenatal care provider about treatment. Preventive treatment is only effective if given within two weeks of potential exposure.

Hepatitis A is generally a mild illness that affects the liver. Symptoms include fatigue, fever, poor appetite, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dark urine and yellowing of the skin and eyes, and can develop from two weeks to two months after exposure

“Anyone who believes they may have symptoms of Hepatitis A should consult with their regular physician, inform their physician of the potential exposure and notify the Westchester County Department of Health,” Dr. Amler said.

As soon as the Health Department learned where the employee worked, its staff began a comprehensive investigation, with the full cooperation of the owner and in consultation with the New York State Department of Health.

A lot of Chicken Salad Recalled Because of Listeria

Here is the damage:

069-2017 Packer Avenue Foods, Inc. Recalls Ready-To-Eat Chicken Salad Due to Misbranding and Undeclared Allergens En Español
068-2017 Gourmet Boutique LLC Recalls Ready-To-Eat Breaded Chicken Products Due to Misbranding and Undeclared Allergens En Español
067-2017 Tyson Foods Inc. Recalls Ready-To-Eat Breaded Chicken Products Due to Misbranding and Undeclared Allergens En Español
066-2017 CC Kitchens, LLC Recalls Meat and Poultry Salad Products Due to Possible Listeria Contamination En Español

Ice Cream with Metal Pieces Recalled

55740-matcha-ice-cream-1497180635Grocery store chain Trader Joe’s is voluntarily recalling all lot codes of its Matcha Green Tea Ice Cream (SKU# 055740). There may be small metal pieces in the product.

No injuries or illnesses have been reported to date.

All potentially affected products have been removed from store shelves and destroyed.

Anyone who purchased Trader Joe’s Matcha Green Tea Ice Cream shouldn’t eat it. They are advised to discard the product or return it to any Trader Joe’s location for a full refund.

Last month, Trader Joe’s recalled its Mikawaya Chocolate Chocolate Mochi Ice Cream because it possibly contained peanuts, which weren’t listed on its ingredient label.