Food Poisoning Information

Since June 11, 2018, Public Health has learned of 17 people from a single meal party who became ill after consuming food and beverage from a buffet at Lahori Kabab-n-Grill in Kent on June 10, 2018. Symptoms and timing of their illness onset are suggestive of a bacterial toxin, such as Bacillus cereus or Clostridium perfringens.

The exact food or drink item that caused the illness has not been identified, though this is not uncommon for outbreaks associated with a bacterial toxin.

The number of new cases reported each week has decreased since the implicated products were recalled on 04 March 2018 (Figure 1).

Neonates ≤28 days of age are the most affected age group, followed by adults aged 15 – 49 years of age (Figure 2).

Most cases have been reported from Gauteng Province (58%, 611/1 049), followed by Western Cape (13%, 132/1 049) and KwaZulu-Natal (8%, 80/1 049) provinces (Table 1).

There have been 209 deaths.

Listeriosis outbreak situation report _11June2018_final

There are 149 cases in 29 states: Alaska (8), Arizona (8), California (30), Colorado (2), Connecticut (2), Florida (1), Georgia (5), Idaho (11), Illinois (2), Kentucky (1), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (3), Michigan (4), Minnesota (10), Mississippi (1), Missouri (1), Montana (8), New Jersey (8), New York (4), North Dakota (2), Ohio (3), Pennsylvania (20), South Dakota (1), Tennessee (1), Texas (1), Utah (1), Virginia (1), Washington (7), and Wisconsin (2). Six are reported ill in Canada

Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 13 to April 25, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 30. Sixty-five percent of ill people are female. Of 129 people with information available, 64 (50%) have been hospitalized, including 17 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. One death was reported from California.

Illnesses that occurred after April 17, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the illness is reported.

According to the FDA, it received confirmation from the Arizona Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement administered by the Arizona Department of Agriculture that romaine lettuce is no longer being produced and distributed from the Yuma growing region, reducing the potential for exposure to contaminated product. However, due to the 21-day shelf life, the FDA cannot be certain that romaine lettuce from this region is no longer in the supply chain.

So, why no recall?

Marler Clark currently represents 64 individuals affected by the outbreak, 10 of whom developed HUS. Marler Clark filed the first lawsuit as a result of the outbreak against Freshway INC. the supplier for Panera Bread in New Jersey. Marler Clark has filed two additional lawsuits, one in Pennsylvania against Freshway and a third in Arizonaagainst Red Lobster.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli outbreaks and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The E. coli lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness infections and have recovered over $650 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our E. coli lawyers have litigated E. coli and HUS cases stemming from outbreaks traced to ground beef, raw milk, lettuce, spinach, sprouts, and other food products.  The law firm has brought E. coli lawsuits against such companies as Jack in the Box, Dole, ConAgra, Cargill, and Jimmy John’s.  We have proudly represented such victims as Brianne Kiner, Stephanie Smith and Linda Rivera.

If you or a family member became ill with an E. coli infection or HUS after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark E. coli attorneys for a free case evaluation.

The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) announced that a meat processor in Sealy, TX, is recalling  2,300 whole frozen chickens because of a risk of Salmonella contamination.

Texas All Grass-Fed, the processor, failed to properly document steps taken to prevent or eliminate bacterial contamination from the chickens, or document that the birds were properly cooled after processing, according to a news release.

The recalled whole chickens were packaged in plastic bags. In addition to being sold at the processor’s storefront in Sealy, the chickens were distributed throughout Houston, Dallas and Austin areas.

Although no illnesses have been reported in connection to the recalled products, the DSHS is urging the public to toss out the recalled chicken, or return it to the point of sale.

As of May 1, 2018, 121 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O157:H7 have been reported from 25 states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from March 13, 2018 to April 21, 2018. Ill people range in age from 1 to 88 years, with a median age of 29. 63 percent of ill people are female. Of 102 people with information available, 52 (51percent) have been hospitalized, including 14 people who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. 1 death was reported from California.

State / Ill People
Alaska / 8
Arizona / 8
California / 24
Colorado / 2
Connecticut / 2
Georgia / 4
Idaho / 11
Illinois / 1
Kentucky / 1
Louisiana / 1
Massachusetts / 2
Michigan / 4
Mississippi / 1
Missouri / 1
Montana / 8
New Jersey / 7
New York / 2
Ohio / 3
Pennsylvania / 20
South Dakota / 1
Tennessee / 1
Utah / 1
Virginia / 1
Washington / 6
Wisconsin / 1
Total / 121

Illnesses that occurred after April 11, 2018, might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill with E. coli and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 3 weeks.

Johannesburg, South Africa – The offices of Richard Spoor Inc., Attorneys, LHL Attorneys Incorporated and Marler Clark commend Tiger Brands on its transparency in releasing Listeriatesting information to shareholders. Tiger Brands released a statement to shareholders on 25 April 2018 confirming the presence of the LST6 Listeria outbreak strain in its facilities and, as a result, the Enterprise facilities in Polokwane, Pretoria, and Germiston will remain closed until the problem is fixed.

According to Tiger Brands, “the purpose of this announcement is to update shareholders on the results of the independent laboratory re-testing which was carried out in respect of the presence of LST6 in the above samples.”

“This confirmation of what the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) reported that this outbreak of Listeria came from the Polokwane factory of Enterprise foods and what today’s statement amounts to is the acknowledgement by the company that indeed this outbreak does come from their factory,” said Lawyer Richard Spoor. “We look forward to working with Tiger Brands’ lawyers and insurers to find an equatble solution for its injured consumers,” added Spoor.

Zain Lundell of LHL Attorneys explained that Tiger Brands’ announcement regarding the results of its independent testing was very helpful in that it further demonsrated the causal link between Tiger Brands’ processed meat products and individuals who became ill or even died as a result of eating those processed meat products. He also noted that he hoped the recent announcement regarding Tiger Brands’ independent testing would result in a speedy and just settlement for individuals affected by the tragic Listeria outbreak.”

According to William Marler, of the US Food Safety Law Firm, Marler Clark, “Tiger Brands should be commended for its transparency with the government and the public, this will go far to restoring consumer confidence.”

Richard Spoor Inc., Attorneys and LHL Attorneys Incorporated have agreed to consolidate the two class actions brought by the two firms against Tiger Brands. The two firms, in partnership with Marler Clark, the leading US Food Safety Law Firm, currently represents 140 people affected by the outbreak. Attorneys are currently in the process of collecting medical records and epidemiological evidence related to the case.

As of April 20, 2018, there are 1019 laboratory confirmed Listeria cases in South Africa and almost 200 people have died. This is the largest Listeria outbreak in history. For more information, visit https://listeriaclassaction.co.za/

Kentucky officials say three deaths have now been reported in a hepatitis A outbreak in six counties.

The number was released Friday, along with a total number of cases of 352, through last Saturday. The state Department of Public Health recommends hepatitis A vaccinations for children older than 1 year and adults living in Jefferson, Bullitt, Hardin, Greenup, Carter and Boyd counties.

Public Health Acting Commissioner Jeffrey Howard said in a news release that it’s safe to travel to Kentucky and attend the May 5 Kentucky Derby. He said the Centers for Disease Control hasn’t issued any travel restrictions or made any vaccination recommendations for travelers.

The Indiana State Department of Health said this week that residents should be vaccinated and protect themselves from hepatitis A when traveling to states experiencing outbreaks.

Escherichia coli (E. coli) are bacteria that live in human and animal intestines. Shiga toxin-producing strains of E. coli, or STECs, are responsible for most food-related E. coli infections. E. coli O157:H7 and other STECs like E. coli O145 and E. coli O121:H19 produce a toxin called Shiga toxin, which causes illness in humans. E. coli bacteria do not make animals such as livestock and deer, which harbor the bacteria in their intestines, ill.

It is estimated that E. coli infections account for over 2,000 hospitalizations in the United States each year, according to a 2011 CDC report.

SOURCES OF E. COLI

E. coli O157:H7 is most commonly found in cows, although chickens, deer, sheep, and pigs have also been known to carry it. Meat becomes contaminated during slaughter, when infected animal intestines or feces come in contact with the carcass. Ground or mechanically tenderized meats are considered riskier than intact cuts of meat because E. coli bacteria, can be mixed throughout the meat in the grinding process or during tenderization.

Other foods that sometimes become contaminated with E. coli bacteria include unpasteurized milk and cheese, unpasteurized juices, alfalfa and radish sprouts, lettuce, spinach, and water. However, any food is at risk of becoming contaminated with E. coli through cross-contamination. One can also get E. coli bacteria from contact with feces of infected animals or people.

The breakdown of sources of E. coli bacteria from 1998-2007 was as follows:

  • Food: 69%
  • Water: 18%
  • Animals or their environment: 8%
  • Person-to-person: 6%

SYMPTOMS OF E. COLI

E. coli symptoms change as the infection progresses. Symptoms usually begin two to five days after infection. The initial symptoms include the sudden onset of cramps and abdominal pain, followed by diarrhea within 24 hours. Diarrhea will become increasingly watery, and then noticeably bloody. People with E. coli infection also often feel nauseated and experience headaches. Less common symptoms include fever and chills.

HUS: A RARE BUT SERIOUS COMPLICATION

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, or HUS, follows around 10 percent of E. coli O157:H7 infections. HUS occurs when Shiga toxins get into the bloodstream and cause the part of the kidney that filters toxins out of the blood to break down, causing kidney injury and sometimes kidney failure.  Some HUS patients also suffer damage to the pancreas and central nervous system impairment.

DIAGNOSIS OF E. COLI

Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infection can be diagnosed in a doctor’s office or hospital by laboratory analysis of a stool sample.

Bacteria isolated from patients’ stool samples can be compared through laboratory analysis, helping to match strains of E. coli to the food or other source it came from, a process called “fingerprinting.”

TREATMENT FOR E. COLI INFECTION

Illness from E. coli usually goes away within a week and does not cause any long-term problems.  One should make sure to remain hydrated and get proper nutrition while sick.

Antibiotics are not used as E. coli treatment, as they do not improve the illness, and some studies show that they can increase the risk of HUS.

HUS is treated by hospitalization. Since there is no way to directly cure HUS, treatment includes care to alleviate symptoms.

PREVENTING INFECTION FROM E. COLI BACTERIA

Any food that you eat has the potential to be contaminated with E. coli bacteria. This is why it is important to take precautions in preparing food and before eating at restaurants. You should also be aware that E. coli bacteria can survive for several weeks on surfaces, so keeping countertops clean is important. Other simple steps you can take to reduce your risk of E. coli infection include:

  • Wash hands thoroughly before and after eating and after going to the bathroom
  • Sanitize all fruits and vegetables before eating by skinning them if possible and washing them before eating
  • Check with your local department of health to find out which restaurants in your area have had recent problems with sanitation
  • Avoid allowing raw meats to come into contact with other foods while cooking
  • Do not allow children to share bath water with anyone who has diarrhea or symptoms of stomach flu
  • Wash hands thoroughly after any contact with farm animals
  • Wear disposable gloves when changing diapers of children with diarrhea
  • Make sure ground meat (such as hamburger patties) reaches an internal temperature of at least 160°F
  • Avoid drinking any non-chlorinated water

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR E. COLI

About-ecoli.com is a comprehensive site with in-depth information about E. coli bacteria and E. coli infection.

EcoliLitigation.com is a Website that provides information about lawsuits and litigation brought on behalf of victims of E. coli outbreaks nationwide.

E. coli Blog  provides up-to-date news related to E. coli outbreaks, research, and more.

Here are the states that are reporting.

Idaho:  Public health officials in Idaho are investigating an outbreak of E. coli infections that are linked to a national outbreak affecting at least 10 other states.

At this time, eight Idaho residents have become sick with E. coli infections. All eight people who have become ill report eating romaine lettuce in the 10 days prior to becoming ill. Three individuals were hospitalized, and two have developed kidney failure linked to the E. coli infection. All hospitalized individuals were adults between the ages of 20 and 55. No deaths have been linked to this outbreak.

Initial investigations by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and public health officials in affected states indicate that chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Ariz., growing region, could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and causing illness. No common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified yet.

The chopped romaine lettuce has been consumed at restaurants and at people’s homes. As the investigation continues, public health officials at the CDC and Idaho are advising against eating pre-chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Ariz., growing region until further information is known.

Public health officials in the Idaho Division of Public Health and multiple Idaho public health districts are continuing to work with the Food and Drug Administration and CDC to investigate the cause of the illnesses. Pre-chopped romaine lettuce is sold in restaurants, delis, supermarkets, and specialty food stores throughout Idaho. Public health officials advise people who have pre-chopped romaine lettuce from Yuma or an unknown source to throw it out, even if they have previously consumed the romaine without becoming ill.

E. coli O157:H7 is a type of bacteria that can cause bloody diarrhea, severe abdominal cramps, vomiting and low-grade fever.
Most people recover from E. coli O157:H7 infection in five to seven days, but for some the infection can be severe and life-threatening, especially for very young children and the elderly. Anyone who has recently consumed pre-chopped romaine lettuce and has diarrhea and severe abdominal cramps should seek medical attention.

New Jersey: Chopped romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Arizona region is likely the source of an E. coli O157:H7 outbreak that has sickened at least seven New Jersey residents and a total of 35 people in 11 states.

At this time, the CDC said, no grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified.

Consumers who have bought romaine lettuce – including salads and salad mixes containing romaine lettuce – should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick. If you don’t know if the lettuce is romaine, throw it away.  Before purchasing romaine lettuce at a grocery store or eating it at a restaurant, consumers should confirm with the store or restaurant that the romaine lettuce did not come from the Yuma, Arizona growing region.

“Individuals with this infection usually get better within about 5 to 7 days, however some illnesses can be serious or even life-threatening,” said Dr. Shereef Elnahal, Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Health. “Anyone experiencing symptoms of this illness should see a healthcare provider.”

The symptoms of E. coli infection vary. Some individuals may have mild to severe diarrhea, which may contain blood. Abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting may occur. Usually there is little or no fever present. We encourage people to contact their health care provider if they have diarrhea that lasts for more than 3 days or is accompanied by high fever, blood in the stool, or so much vomiting that they cannot keep liquids down and they pass very little urine.

In addition, about 5 to 10% of people who are diagnosed with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infection develop a potentially life-threatening complication known as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). HUS develops about 7 days after symptoms first appear, when diarrhea is improving. Clues that someone is developing HUS include decreased frequency of urination, feeling very tired, and losing pink color in cheeks and inside the lower eyelids. Any who develop these symptoms should seek out medical care immediately.

Currently in New Jersey, DOH has confirmed a total of seven cases of E. Coli; 4 in Hunterdon County, and one each in Monmouth, Sussex and Somerset counties. As additional testing is completed, more cases may be added. DOH is continuing to work with our local health partners to identify, interview and obtain lab specimens from New Jersey residents who may have become ill from this contaminated food.

The CDC also advises that all restaurants and retailers ask their suppliers about the source of their romaine lettuce and refrain from selling or servicing any that was grown in Yuma, Arizona. The CDC and DOH will continue to provide updates as more information becomes available.

Illinois:  The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and other state and local health departments, is investigating a multi-state cluster of E. coli infections linked to chopped romaine lettuce.

Information collected to date indicates that chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region could be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7 and could make people sick.  At this time, no common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified.

One case linked to the outbreak has been identified in Illinois.  To date, 35 other cases have been reported in 11 states with 22 hospitalizations and no deaths. The Illinois resident reported consuming chopped romaine lettuce before illness onset, in central Illinois.

Consumers in Illinois who have store-bought chopped romaine lettuce at home, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.

If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine, do not eat it and throw it away.  Before purchasing romaine lettuce at a grocery store or eating it at a restaurant, consumers should confirm with the store or restaurant that it is not chopped romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona growing region. If you cannot confirm the source of the romaine lettuce, do not buy it or eat it.

Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any chopped romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing chopped romaine lettuce, from the Yuma, Arizona growing region.

Restaurants and retailers should ask their suppliers about the source of their chopped romaine lettuce.

People usually get sick from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli two-eight days after swallowing the germ.  Most people infected with E. colidevelop diarrhea (often bloody), severe stomach cramps, and vomiting.  Most people recover within one week although some illnesses can be more severe, resulting in a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

Talk to your health care provider if you have symptoms of an E. coli infection and report your illness to your local health department. You can also write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick and talk to public health investigators if they have questions about your illness.

The following is a statement from Dr. Matthew Cartter, State Epidemiologist and Director of Infectious Diseases at the State Department of Public Health, on today’s announcement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that it is actively investigating a multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7, which has sickened 17 individuals in seven states, including two in Connecticut.

“We are assisting the CDC in investigating a multi-state outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections.  It is still early in the investigation and no specific source of the infection has been identified so far.

Most people infected with E. coli will develop diarrhea, severe stomach cramps and vomiting within 3-4 days of swallowing the germ.  People who develop symptoms of E. coli, should seek medical care, contact their local health department to report the illness, and try to track what foods were eaten and restaurants visited in the days prior to becoming ill.

In general, people can prevent contracting E. coli by washing hands after using the restroom or changing diapers, before and after preparing or eating food and after contact with animals; cooking meats to proper temperatures; thoroughly washing all surfaces that touch raw meat; washing fruits and vegetables before eating; avoiding unpasteurized dairy products; and avoiding preparing food or drinks for others when you are sick.”

Rose Acre Farms of Seymour, Indiana is voluntarily recalling 206,749,248 eggs because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella Braenderup, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy individuals infected with Salmonella Braenderup can experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella Braenderup can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The eggs were distributed from the farm in Hyde County, North Carolina and reached consumers in the following states: Colorado, Florida, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia through retail stores and restaurants via direct delivery.

22 illnesses have been reported to date.

The affected eggs, from plant number P-1065 with the Julian date range of 011 through date of 102 printed on either the side portion or the principal side of the carton or package, as follows:

Lot Codes 011 – 102

Item Description Carton UPC
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A LARGE X 30 DOZEN 077236000302
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A LARGE X15 DOZEN 077236000302
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A JUMBO X24 DOZEN 077236000500
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A MEDIUM X30 DOZEN 077236000203
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A XLARGE X30 DOZEN 077236000401
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A JUMBO X12 DOZEN 077236000500
FOOD LION A JUMBO X 12 DOZEN 035826089618
FOOD LION A MEDIUM X15 DOZEN 035826089649
FOOD LION A XLARGE X 15 DOZEN 035826089625
FOOD LION A 18PK LARGE X15 DOZEN 035826089601
FOOD LION A LARGE X15 DOZEN 035826089588
FOOD LION A 6PK LARGE X 15 DOZEN 035826089632
LOOSE A USDA SMALL X 30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A USDA MEDIUM X 30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A XLARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A MEDIUM X 15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE A MEDIUM X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA XLARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE X15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA MEDIUM X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE AA XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE PFG X 30 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA AA LARGE PFG X 15 DOZEN N/A
LOOSE USDA A XLARGE X30 DOZEN N/A
NELMS A JUMBO X24 634181000018
WAFFLE HOUSE LOOSE USDA A LARGE X 30 DOZEN N/A
CRYSTAL FARMS A MEDIUM X30 077236000203
CRYSTAL FARMS A 18PK MEDIUM X 30 077236000258
CRYSTAL FARMS A 2.5 DOZ MEDIUM X 25 077236000124
COUNTRY DAYBREAK A XLARGE X15 DOZEN 077236000401
COUNTRY DAYBREAK USDA GRADE A XLARGE X 240 DOZEN PULP 077236700400
COUNTRY DAYBREAK USDA GRADE A LARGE RACK X 240 DOZEN PULP 077236700301
COBURN FARMS A MEDIUM MP X 30 DOZEN 051933182608
COBURN FARMS A LARGE X 30 DOZEN 051933190801
COBURN FARMS A 18PK LARGE X 30 DOZEN 051933182509
SUNSHINE FARMS A JUMBO X 12 DOZEN 804879457336
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE LARGE (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE LARGE (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE MEDIUM (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE XLARGE (6-2.5 FLATS) X 15 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE MEDIUM (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
GLENVIEW USDA AA LOOSE XLARGE (12-2.5 FLATS) X 30 DOZEN N/A
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 18PK XLARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127132
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK XLARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127128
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA TWIN 18PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127101
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 6PK LARGE X 15 DOZEN 078742127095
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK MEDIUM X 15 DOZEN 078742127224
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 12PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127071
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 18PK LARGE X 24 DOZEN RPC 078742127088
GREAT VALUE GRADE A 12PK JUMBO X 22 DOZEN RPC 078742127149
GREAT VALUE GRADE A USDA 5DZ LARGE X 5 DOZEN 078742127118

The voluntary recall was a result of some illnesses reported on the U.S. East Coast, which led to extensive interviews and eventually a thorough FDA inspection of the Hyde County farm, which produces 2.3 million eggs a day. The facility includes 3 million laying hens with a USDA inspector on-site daily.